Business Performance Matrix - United Way Conferences Site

Report
New Organizing Frameworks:
Business Performance Matrix
and United Way Partnerships
United Way U.S. CEO Summit
February 15, 2013
Today We Will Discuss
2
•
United Way’s new organizing framework for
local United Ways in the U.S. – the Business
Performance Matrix
•
What’s in the Matrix
•
Using the Matrix as a tool to drive local
performance
•
United Way Partnerships in Graduation and
Corporate Engagement
Organizing for Success
Timeline of Business Performance Matrix Creation
Creation of U.S.
Task Force on
United Way’s
Economic
Model & Growth
Task Force
Executive
Summary:
Recommends new
segmentation
framework
Network
Engagement and
Support Team
(NEST) Formed
Business
Performance
Matrix developed
April 2010
July 2011
September 2011
May 2012
Highlights:
•
•
•
•
•
•
3
18-member field committee
Two National Professional Council endorsements
Presentation on work at Community Leaders Conference
Two national webinars on work with more than 400 attendees
Builds on Standards of Excellence and the ‘new business’
700+ United Ways receiving Matrix segment designation
Segment 2B/C, 3B/C Webinar
November 14, 2012
Network Engagement and Support Team Committee Members
4
NAME
UNITED WAY
TITLE
Jill Michal (Chair)
United Way of Greater Philadelphia and
Southern New Jersey
President and CEO
Kerry Blume (Vice Chair)
United Way of Northern Arizona
President & CEO
Bob Berdelle (Executive Sponsor)
United Way Worldwide
Senior Vice President and Chief
Financial Officer
Chris Preston
United Way Worldwide
Project Manager
Karen Rathke
Heartland United Way (NE)
President
Kate McGowan
United Way of Addison County (VT)
Co-Director
Eric McDonnell
United Way of the Bay Area
Executive Vice President & COO
Donna Buchanan
United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta
Chief Operating Officer
Peter Carpino
United Way of Greater Rochester
President & CEO
Patrick Jinks
United Way of Lancaster County (PA)
President/ CEO
Connie Hodges
United Way of Northeast Florida
President
Alice Thacker
United Way Retirees Association
Scott Ferguson
United Way of the Chattahoochee Valley
(GA)
President and CEO
Debby Hampton
United Way of Central Oklahoma
President & CEO
Carol Burger
United Way of the Capital Area (MS)
President and CEO
Mary Lou Goeke
United Way of Santa Cruz County (CA)
Executive Director
Jeff Elder
United Way Worldwide
Director, Research
Segment 2B/C, 3B/C Webinar
November 14, 2012
Business Performance Matrix
Resources/Capacity/Influence
Y-Axis
4
0
0%
14
1%
13
1%
28
2%
3
54
4%
163
13%
60
5%
45
4%
2
205
16%
269
22%
40
3%
27
2%
1
245
20%
82
6%
3
<1%
1
<1%
Missing Data
A
B
C
0-49
50-74
75-100
Business Performance Index
X-Axis
5
Organizing for Success
Source: United Way Research
Business Performance Matrix
Y-axis Is Relatively Fixed Year to Year, Movement is on X-axis
Resources/Capacity/Influence
Population ≥ 1,000,000
4
F500 / GCL co. HQ or
≥ 12 GCL non-HQ co.’s
3
No F500/GCL co. HQ and
<12 GCL non-HQ co.’s
2
FTE < 1
1
A
B
C
0-49
50-74
75-100
Business Performance Index (BPI)
6
Organizing for Success
Scope of Business Performance Index Is Comprehensive
Show Leadership
• Align and integrate
• Strategically communicate
• Develop talent
• Network engagement
Engage Individuals, Organizations, and the Community
• Engage and align with the community*
• Publicly commit to an issue
• Deepen relationships with individuals, organizations and networks
• Mobilize resources
Develop Community Impact Strategies to Get Results
• Develop and implement community impact strategies to get results
7
Organizing for Success
8
Individual Profiles: Key Points
• All profiles are at http://online.unitedway.org/bpm
• If you did not get a matrix designation, we’re doing it again
this summer and fall
• Indexes aren’t perfect; the nuances of your progress may
not be evident in every individual topic (and we know that)
• There is a key online that shows you what survey
questions go into each of the 25 topics
• The tool is only as accurate and useful as you want it to
be
9
Organizing for Success
The Matrix is a tool for you
• Use it in your strategic planning
• Set local goals to move indicators
• Reach out to United Ways leading in key areas to
learn more
• Share what you know in strong areas with your
colleagues
10
Organizing for Success
Using the Matrix: Examples
11
Organizing for Success
Table Conversation
1. Brainstorm examples of how you could use the matrix for
learning, for driving your own performance
2. What other information do you need to make the
Business Performance Matrix useful?
3. What other support should we provide?
12
Organizing for Success
Key points of contact
United Way
Contact Name(s)
Group 4 United Ways
Sean Garrett
[email protected]
Jeff Sheedy
[email protected]
Group 3 United Ways
Jamie Mueller
[email protected]
Groups 1 & 2 United Ways
Roger Wood
[email protected]
General Questions
Mike Wood
[email protected]
Kelli Kreps
[email protected]
13
Organizing for Success
Next Steps: Business Performance Matrix
• Regional Conferences
• Mid-Winter Institute
• Tri-State Conference)
• State Meetings
• Texas, Pennsylvania, Others TBD
• Staff Leaders Conference
• Resource Page – http://online.unitedway.org/bpm
• UWW field engagement aligned to Matrix
14
Organizing for Success
Discussion
15
Organizing for Success
United Way Partnerships
16
Organizing for Success
Driving Performance: United Way Performance
Partnerships Overview
•
Groups of United Ways working on
issues collectively: Graduation,
Corporate Engagement
•
Formal agreements (MOUs)
•
Sharing human and financial resources
to address common challenges
•
Making strategic decisions together
•
Holding one another accountable
•
Measuring results collectively
Each Partnership will launch with a 14-month Partnering
Program which will provide coaching and facilitation to help build
our partnering muscle.
17
Driving Performance: United Way Performance
Partnerships – Commitments and Benefits
Commitments
18
Benefits
•
Dedicate CEO, lead volunteer and
lead staff time to the partnership
•
Engage in joint planning, coinvesting of resources, and joint
resource development for shared
goals
•
Improved relationships with key
partners
•
•
More access to best practices,
training, and technical support
Invest in and participate in 14month Partnering Program with an
initial fee of $30,000
•
Greater ability to attract human
and financial resources
•
Other commitments and
investments to be decided on by
the members of the Partnerships
• Achieve better local results
through:
• Enhanced local and national
leadership
• Ability to innovate and take
risks
Thank You

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