slides - OCM Boces

Report
Balanced
Assessment
System
Standards
Professional
Practice
Data
Culture
Standardsbased, revised,
upgraded,
realigned units
Professional
Practice
Data
Culture
Standards-based,
revised,
upgraded,
realigned units
Professional
Practice
Common
formative/
interim
assessments
Culture
Standardsbased, revised,
upgraded,
realigned units
APPR,
including
SLOs
Common
formative/
interim
assessments
Culture
Standardsbased, revised,
upgraded,
realigned units
APPR,
including
SLOs
Common
formative/
interim
assessments
Meaningful
collaboration
on the right
work
Standards
Professional
Practice
Data
Culture
Balanced
Assessment
System
Standards
Professional
Practice
Data
Culture
Assessment
Defines the
Standard
Professional
Practice
Data
Culture
50% of 20:
67% of 81:
Shawn got 7 correct answers
out of 10 possible answers on
his science test. What percent
of questions did he get correct?
J.J. Redick was on pace to set an
NCAA record in career free
throw percentage. Leading into
the NCAA tournament in 2004,
he made 97 of 104 free throw
attempts. What percentage of
free throws did he make?
J.J. Redick was on pace to set an NCAA
record in free throw percentage.
Leading into the NCAA tournament in
2004, he made 97 of 104 free throw
attempts. In the first tournament
game, Redick missed his first five free
throws. How far did his percentage
drop?
J.J. Redick and Chris Paul were competing for the
best free-throw shooting percentage. Redick made
94% of his first 103 shots, while Paul made 47 out
of 51 shots. Which one had a better shooting
percentage?
In the next game, Redick made only 2 of 10 shots
while Paul made 7 of 10 shots. What are their new
overall shooting percentages? Who is the better
shooter?
Jason argued that if Paul and J.J. each made the
next ten shots, their shooting percentages would
go up the same amount. Is this true? Why or why
not?
Standards (and objectives) are
meaningless until you define
how to assess them.
Because of this, assessments
are the starting point for
instruction, not the end.
Because of this, assessments
are the starting point for
instruction, not the end.
Standards-Based (UbD) Design:
1. Standards
2. Assessment
3. Instruction
Assessment
Defines the
Standard
Professional
Practice
Common
formative/
interim
assessments
Culture
UNIT
UNIT
UNIT
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
June
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
UNIT
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
SLO Summative
September
SLO Baseline
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
UNIT
UNIT
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
June
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
UNIT
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
SLO Summative
September
SLO Baseline
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
UNIT
UNIT
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
June
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
UNIT
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
SLO Summative
September
SLO Baseline
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
UNIT
UNIT
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
June
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
UNIT
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
UNIT
SLO Summative
September
SLO Baseline
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessment
Assessment
Defines the
Standard
Effective
Assessment
by the
Teacher
Common
formative/
interim
assessments
Culture
Standard 5: Assessment for Student Learning
5.1 Design, adapt, select, and use a range of
assessment tools and processes to measure and
document student learning and growth
5.2 Understand, analyze, interpret, and use
assessment data to monitor student progress and to
plan and differentiate instruction
5.3 Communicate information about various
components of the assessment system
5.4 Reflect upon and evaluate the effectiveness of
their comprehensive assessment system to adjust
assessment and plan instruction accordingly
5.5 Prepare students to understand the format
Assessment
Defines the
Standard
Effective
Assessment
by the
Teacher
Common
formative/
interim
assessments
Culture
Assessment
Defines the
Standard
Effective
Assessment
by the
Teacher
Common
formative/
interim
assessments
Authentic
Professional
Learning
Community
make
the
test
make
the
test
give the
test
make
the
test
give the
test
analyze
the
work
make
the
test
do something
about it
give the
test
analyze
the
work
PLC
C
Assessment
Defines the
Standard
Effective
Assessment
by the
Teacher
Common
formative/
interim
assessments
Authentic
Professional
Learning
Community
Balanced
Assessment
System
Shifts in Data Driven Instruction
Shift 1 Data belongs with
teachers working
collaboratively
Shift 2 Emphasis on
formative
assessment
Shift 3 Assess what is
important
Shift 4 Take meaningful
action
Shift 5 Commitment to
continuous
improvement
Shift 6 Commitment to
student
involvement
Collaboration of teachers is expected and valued. Teachers work together
and take collective responsibility for student learning. Sufficient time for
meaningful collaboration is built into every schedule. Protocols are in place
to guide data inquiry processes.
A balanced assessment system uses classroom assessments, common
formative assessments, common interim assessments, and summative
assessments to paint a balanced picture of student progress. Unlike
summative assessments, formative assessments take on a more prominent
role in the balanced assessment system due to the quality and immediacy of
the data collected. To reflect this importance, common assessments are
calendared, administered, scored, and analyzed collaboratively.
A guaranteed and viable curriculum is provided to all students and drives the
assessment system. Teachers clearly identify, communicate, and assess
the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are the priority for each unit and
course.
Rather than waiting on summative data, teachers quickly respond to the
data gathered from formative and interim assessments. It is this careful
examination of student work that creates the foundation for all current and
future curriculum, program, and instructional decisions.
The status quo can never be an option. All educators must constantly search
for better ways to achieve mutual goals and increase achievement for all
students. All programs, policies, and practices are continually assessed on
their contribution to student learning.
The power of formative assessments are only truly recognized when
students are included as users of the data. Therefore, students must play an
integral role in the assessment process. Students must be able to assess
and monitor their own progress in order to set individual goals for learning.
Balanced
Assessment
System
Strategic
Assessment
System
Set Up
System
Classroom Assessments
Common
Common
Formative
Interim
Assessments Assessments
Student
Learning
Objectives
External
Assessments
Examples
Worksheets,
classroom response,
whiteboards, exit
tickets, conferences,
student selfassessment
Chapter/unit tests,
final projects
Common tasks and
prompts assessed
with rubric, quizzes
Performances, tests,
or writing prompts
given every 6-8
weeks
Growth measures
designed for use with
the APPR growth and
local achievement
3-8 tests, Regents
exams, SAT, AP
Format
Very formative; can
be diagnostic if used
prior to instruction
Mostly summative
Formative
Formative and
summative
Summative
Very summative
Classroom teachers
Classroom teachers
Grade level/discipline teams of teachers
working together. District teams of
representative teachers may also look at the
data
Teachers and lead
evaluators/principals
An external group of
“experts”
Provides immediate
feedback and guides
instructional decisions
Provision of grades
To assess student learning in order to make
instructional decisions. Also serves to assess
curriculum, instruction, and pacing.
Conversion to scores
for use in teacher and
principal evaluation
Accountability and
placement
Responsibility
Purpose
Balanced
Assessment
System

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