Sensory Processing

Report
Sensory Processing
Disorder
PRESENTATION
created by FTTA
Disclaimer
Please note that FTTA presenters, lectures and staff are not
medical professionals. This information is designed to be
used for education assistants under the supervision of
professionals and some parts may be incorrect, outdated or
the authors’ opinion.
Sensory Processing Disorder
A complex neurological condition that
impairs a child’s functional skills
The brain interprets all sensory information. When this gets misinterpreted, the
child may feel overwhelmed with this sensory information they receive. As a
reaction to this, ‘sensory seeking’ or avoidance behaviours may happen.
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Sensory Integration
(S.I.) describes how the brain sorts and organises
the sensations we receive and how to use them
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Adapted from Miller, 2006
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Smell
What are the
senses?
Gravity /
Pressure
Hearing
Sight
Taste
Movement &
Balance
Touch
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What is
Sensory
Processing
Disorder?
1
The brain and nervous system receive
2
The central nervous system sends the
information from all body parts about
the world from the senses.
messages throughout the body. These
messages affect the functions of the
body.
3
If there is a miscommunication from one
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Functions that get affected include:
part to another, it affects other functions
too.
muscle movement, coordination,
learning, behaviour, emotions, thought,
memory…
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This is very uncomfortable for the child
and they may react in unusual ways.
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/// So…
Difficulties
organising
information
Affects understanding of
what they are:
touching
tasting
hearing
feeling
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seeing
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/// Which then leads to
Strong
emotional
behaviours
Coping
strategies
Physically
Meltdowns
hurting oneself
Applying
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pressure
biting
Seek out
sensory
experiences
Avoidance
Touching interesting
textures
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The child is not doing the behaviour to
annoy you. The brain wants a sensory
experience to regulate their feelings
and emotions.
You need to use appropriate strategies
and resources to give them this
experience so they can feel calm and
normal.
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People with
SPD
experience
their world
as either:
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Hypersensitive
Over reactive
Sensory avoidance
Hyposensitive
Under reactive
Sensory seeker
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Clumsy
Academic failure
Anxiety
Labels
Poor self-concept
Aggression
Inability to make
Depression
friends or be part
of a group
“Out of control”
Disruptive
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/// Duty of
Care
Extra
supervision
Teaching
peers about
needs of child
and reactions
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Extra
assistance on
play
equipment
Use non-toxic
products,
glues, paints
etc
Risk taker
Strategic
management
plan for
meltdowns
Close
monitoring of
sensory
needs
Predicting
needs to avoid
meltdowns
Backup
activity
Sensory
resources
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Extra Care
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Correct diagnosis is
important!
Many children with
ADHD and ASD also
have SPD
Sensory Processing
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Disorder
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Types of
treatments
& programs
1
Sensory Equipment & Tools
2
Alternative listening and music
3
Daily massage, sensory
therapy
experience program according to
needs
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Fundamental movement skills
program
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/// Sensory tools
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Extra Strategies for EAs
Students with SPD require a few modifications to for their
day
• Know the needs of the child. Are they hypo or hyper
• stimulated? This will affect their behaviour a lot.
• Preventative strategies. Use the sensory resources – do not think you
can ‘train’ them out of their sensory seeking behaviours.
• Remember the brain misinterprets the information it receives, this is
why the chid acts so differently because they are trying to feel what is
normal for them.
• Work closely with the OT and other therapists. Learn the strategies
and incorporate them into the day.
• Social skills to peers to include SPD child into play and socialising
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Strategies for EAs
• The child is not deliberating breaking their pencil or toys. Pressure
senses information is incorrectly received. Supply resources that can
withstand banging and rough play.
• Have extra pencils already sharpened to reduce lost time replacing
broken tips.
• Instead of thin paper, use thicker card so if the child needs to use an
eraser, they are less likely to tear the paper
• Closely monitor noise – ear muffs to block sound? Music to stimulate?
• Learn a fundamental movement skills program. Large spinning tops,
barrels to roll in , pretending to have a rolling pin on your body can
have amazing calming affects on the child
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Strategies for EAs
• Work with a team. Have a strategic management plan to prevent
meltdowns and what to do if a meltdown occurs.
• Teach peers to respect and not touch the child’s sensory tools and
equipment.
• Playdo, paint, gluing, sandpit and other sensory experiences can be
too much for the child. Punishing the child for not participating will
not help. Try and modify the activity. For instance, finger painting with
the paint in a ziplock bag?
• If smells are offensive, check that your deodorant or perfume is ok.
• Position child in class in the best possible location for their needs.
Ticking clock too noisy? Flickering fluoro lights? Too bright?
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Strategies for EAs
• Regular movement time for the movement sensory seekers
• Is extra assistance when doing obstacle courses needed? Balance and
coordination affected? Modify some parts if the risk of falling or injury
is too high.
• Some behaviours are very distracting, such as constantly kicking the
table. Find a quieter resource. Such as elastic resistance band around
ankles that when stretched may create the pressure experience the
child is seeking
• For the fussy eaters, do not single them out with their inadequate and
limited diet. What you see could be unknown progress!
• Sensitive fingers for writing – what about typing? Videoing verbal
answers? Scribe?
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Want to know more?
Sensory Clothing and Toys
http://www.undercovertape.com/
www.frilledtobits.com.au/sensory
http://www.seamsaway.com.au/
http://www.itmakessense.com.au/
http://www.merrygomonkey.com/collections/teddy
-hair-the-first-bear-with-hair
Links for Sensory Tools / Equipment
http://www.sensorytools.net/
http://www.spdaustralia.com.au/
http://www.lifeskills4kids.com.au/
http://www.senseabilities.com.au/
http://www.skillbuilders.com.au/
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http://www.frilledtobits.com.au/sensory
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