SLO for Nonpilot Districts - Windber Area School District LocalWeb

Report
Pennsylvania’s
Student Learning Objective
Process
Overview for School Leaders
Session Objectives
I. Review Teacher
Effectiveness System
II. Define SLO process
III. Exploring SLO Templates
-Assessment LiteracyIV. Identifying Key Points for
School Leaders
V. Action Planning
I. Teacher Effectiveness
System
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(B) FOR PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYES AND TEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL
EMPLOYES WHO SERVE AS CLASSROOM TEACHERS, THE FOLLOWING
SHALL APPLY:
(1) BEGINNING IN THE 2013-201 4 SCHOOL YEAR, THE EVALUATIO N
OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYES AND
TEMPORARY
PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYES SERVING AS CLASSROOM TEACHERS
SHALL GIVE
DUE CONSIDERATION TO THE FOLLOWING:
(I) CLASSROOM OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE MODELS THAT ARE
RELATED TO STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN EACH OF THE FOLLOWING
AREAS:
(A) PLANNING AND PREPARATION.
(B) CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT.
(C) INSTRUCTION.
(D) PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES.
(II) STUDENT PERFORMANCE, WHICH SHALL COMPRISE FIFTY PER
CENTUM (50%) OF THE OVERALL RATING OF THE PROFESSIONAL
EMPLOYE
OR TEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYE SERVING AS A
CLASSROOM TEACHER
AND SHALL BE BASED UPON MULTIPLE MEASURES OF
Act 82
Teacher Effectiveness System in Act 82 of 2012
Building Level Data/School Performance Profile
Teacher Observation & Practice
Effective 2013-2014 SY
Danielson Framework Domains
1. Planning and Preparation
2. Classroom Environment
3. Instruction
4. Professional Responsibilities
Effective 2013-2014 SY
Indicators of Academic Achievement
Indicators of Closing the Achievement Gap, All Students
Indicators of Closing the Achievement Gap, Subgroups
Academic Growth PVAAS
Other Academic Indicators
Credit for Advanced Achievement
Teacher Specific Data
PVAAS / Growth 3 Year Rolling Average
1. 2013-2014 SY
2. 2014-2015 SY
Teacher Specific 3. 2015-2016 SY
Data, 15%
Other data as provided in Act 82
Building Level
Data, 15%
Observation/
Practice, 50%
Elective Data/SLOs
Optional 2013-2014 SY
Effective 2014-2015 SY
Elective
Data, 20%
District Designed Measures and Examinations
Nationally Recognized Standardized Tests
Industry Certification Examinations
Student Projects Pursuant to Local Requirements
Student Portfolios Pursuant to Local Requirements
5
Teacher Effectiveness System in Act 82 of 2012
Building Level Data/School Performance Profile
Teacher Observation & Practice
Effective 2013-2014
Danielson Framework Domains
1.
2.
3.
4.
Planning and Preparation
Classroom Environment
Instruction
Professional Responsibilities
Effective 2013-2014 SY
Indicators of Academic Achievement
Indicators of Closing the Achievement Gap, All Students
Indicators of Closing the Achievement Gap, Subgroups
Academic Growth PVAAS
Other Academic Indicators
Credit for Advanced Achievement
Building Level
Data, 15%
Elective Data/SLOs
Observation/
Practice,
50%
Optional 2013-2014 SY
Effective 2014-2015 SY
Elective Data,
35%
District Designed Measures and Examinations
Nationally Recognized Standardized Tests
Industry Certification Examinations
Student Projects Pursuant to Local Requirements
Student Portfolios Pursuant to Local Requirements
6
Educator Effectiveness Prezi
• http://prezi.com/2wjeukgle6ja/?utm_campaig
n=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share
Observation/Evidence
(50%)
4 Domains, 22 Components
Principal/Evaluator Observes
Multiple Measures of
Student Achievement
1. Building Level Data (School
Performance Profile)
Academic Achievement,
Graduation/Promotion Rate,
Attendance, AP-IB Courses
offered, PSAT, Building
Level PSSA and Keystone
Assessment Data
2. Correlation Data Based on
Teacher Level Measures
PSSA, Keystone Data
3. Elective Data (SLOs)
II. SLO Process
SLO Process
A process to
document a
measure of educator
effectiveness
based on student
achievement of
content standards.
SLO Concepts
Student achievement can be
measured in ways that reflect
authentic learning of content
standards.
Educator effectiveness can be
measured through use of
student achievement measures.
The SLO in PA is written to a
specific teacher and a specific
class/course/content area for
which that teacher provides
instruction in the area they are
certified to teach.
Many factors can influence the size of an SLO,
Time Frame
Course Content
Important Learning Needs
but the process remains
the same………..
SLO Process Design
GoalStandards
Performance
Measures
Indicators
Indicator #1
Assessment
#1a
Indicator #2
SLO Goal
Assessment
#1b
Assessment #2
SLO Process Criteria
SLOs should:
1. Represent the diversity of students
and courses/content areas taught.
2. Align to a set of approved
indicators/targets related to selected
academic content standards.
3. Be based upon two time-bound
events/data collection periods and/or
performance defined levels of
“mastery”.
4. Be supported by verifiable data that
can be collected and scored in a
standardized manner.
5. Include a set of independent
performance measures.
SLO Process Steps:
Teacher
1. Identify subject and students
2. Select the “big idea” from the
content standards
3. Establish a goal
4. Identify indicators associated
with the goal
5. Select and/or create
performance measures for
each indicator
6. Create performance
expectations across all
indicators
III. SLO Template
SLO Template
A process tool used to
identify goals, indicators,
and performance
measures for use in the
greater Teacher
Effectiveness System
Handouts: SLO Template, Help Desk,
& Performance Task Framework
SLO Template Design
Context
Goal
Measures
Indicators
Expectations
SLO Template Criteria
1. Goals are based upon the “big
ideas” within the content
standards.
2. Performance indicators are
specific, measureable, attainable,
and realistic.
3. Performance measures should be
valid, reliable, and rigorous
assessments.
4. Data should be collected,
organized, and reported in a
consistent manner.
5. Teacher expectations of student
achievement should be
demanding.
SLO Template Steps:
Teacher
1. Classroom Context
1a. Name
1b. School
1c. District
1d. Class/
Course Title
1e. Grade
Level
1f. Total # of
Students
1g. Typical
Class Size
1h. Class
Frequency
1i. Typical
Class Duration
2. SLO Goal
2a. Goal Statement
2b. PA Standards
2c. Rationale
Spanish 1
Students will be able demonstrate
effective communication in the target
language by speaking and listening,
writing, and reading.
8th Grade Art
Students will demonstrate the ability to
manipulate visual art materials and tools
to create works based on the ideas of
other artists and to evaluate the
processes and products of themselves
and other artists.
Grade 5 Library
Students will demonstrate the ability to
use online D.P.S. databases and search
engines, Britannica Elementary, Culture
Grams, and Nettrekker toward support
real world experiences and determining
which is the best source for specific
information.
Targeted content standards
used in developing the SLO.
Arts and
Humanities:
9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4
http://pdesas.org/
Explains why the SLO is important
and how students will demonstrate
learning of the standards through
this objective.
Grade 8 Art:
Developing the ability to manipulate
visual art materials and tools are
important to the artistic creation
process, as is the ability to evaluate
the process and product created by
oneself and others.
Child Development (FCS)
Understanding how children grow and
develop will prepare individuals and
families to meet challenges associated
with raising children.
SLO Template Steps:
Teacher
3. Performance Measures (PM)
3a. Name
3c.
Purpose





PM #1
PM #2
PM #3
PM #4
PM #5





PM #1
PM #2
PM #3
PM #4
PM #5







3g. Resources/

Equipment



3i.

Administration & 
Scoring Personnel 

3e.
Administration
Frequency
3b. Type
PM #1
PM #2
PM #3
PM #4
PM #5
PM #1
PM #2
PM #3
PM #4
PM #5
PM #1
PM #2
PM #3
PM #4
PM #5
____District-designed Measures and
Examinations
____Nationally Recognized Standardized Tests
____Industry Certification Examinations
____Student Projects
____Student Portfolios
____ Other:______________________________
Growth (change in student performance across
two or more points in time)
3d. Metric
Mastery (attainment of a defined level of
achievement)
Growth and Mastery
3f. Adaptations/
Accommodations
IEP
3h. Scoring Tools
3j. Performance
Reporting
Gifted IEP
ELL










Other
PM #1
PM #2
PM #3
PM #4
PM #5
PM #1
PM #2
PM #3
PM #4
PM #5
Many things must be
considered when choosing or
building quality assessments.
Choosing or Building Performance Measures
and Tasks
What does a Teacher do to
administer a performance
measure?
What must a Student know and
do to complete a performance
measure?
How does a Teacher
score a performance
measure?
SLO Template Steps:
Teacher
4. Performance Indicators (PI)
4a. PI Targets:
All Student Group





PI Target #1
PI Target #2
PI Target #3
PI Target #4
PI Target #5
4b. PI Targets:
Subset Student Group
(optional)





PI Target #1
PI Target #2
PI Target #3
PI Target #4
PI Target #5
4c. PI Linked
(optional)
4d. PI Weighting
(optional)
Describes individual student
performance expectation
4a.
What performance measure(s) –
tests, assessments– will be used to
measure student achievement of
the standards, and what’s the
expected student achievement
level based on the scoring system
for those measures?
4b.
What’s the expected achievement
level for unique populations? (IEP,
students who did not do well on a
pre-test, etc.)
Performance
Indicator Statement
HS Choral
Individual Vocal Assessment Task
Students will achieve proficient or
advanced levels in 6 out of 8 criteria
of the second scoring rubric.
5th Grade ELA
DRA text gradient chart
Students will demonstrate one year
of reading growth
A Temporary Detour…
Foundational Knowledge
Basic Assessment Literacy
Test Specifications
When developing test specifications consider:
• Sufficient sampling of targeted content standards
• Aim for a 3:1 items per standard ratio
• Developmental readiness of test-takers
• Type of items
• Multiple Choice (MC)
• Short Constructed Response (SCR)
• Extended Constructed Response (ECR)/Complex Performance
tasks
• Time burden imposed on both educators and
students
34
Test Specifications (cont.)
When developing test specifications consider:
• Cognitive load
• Aim for a balance of DoK levels
• Objectivity of scoring
• Each constructed response item/task will need a
well-developed rubric
• Weight of items (point values)
• Measures (tests) should consist of 25-35 total
points; 35-50 points for high school
• Item cognitive demand level/DoK level
• Measures should reflect a variety of DoK levels as
represented in the targeted content standards
35
Test Specifications Example
Content Strand(s)
Expressions & Equations
Creating Equations
Structure in Expressions
Ratios & Proportions
Reasoning with Equations & Inequalities
Interpreting Functions
Real Number System
Grand Totals
Content Strand(s)
Expressions & Equations
Creating Equations
Structure in Expressions
Ratios & Proportions
Reasoning with Equations & Inequalities
Interpreting Functions
Real Number System
Grand Totals
MC
4
5
3
3
4
3
5
27
SCR
0
0
0
2
1
2
1
6
ECR
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
MC
(1 pt.)
4
5
3
3
4
3
5
27
SCR
(2pts.)
0
0
0
4
2
4
2
12
ECR
(4pts.)
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
8
Total
4
5
3
5
5
6
7
35
*Performance
measure contains 35
items/tasks.
Total
4
5
3
7
6
11
11
47
*Performance
measure score based
upon 47 points.
36
Test Specifications Example (cont.)
Content Strand(s)
Expressions & Equations
Creating Equations
Structure in Expressions
Ratios & Proportions
Reasoning with Equations &
Inequalities
Interpreting Functions
Real Number System
Grand Totals
DoK 1
1
1
2
0
3
DoK 2
2
2
0
5
2
DoK 3
1
2
1
0
0
Total
4
5
3
5
5
0
1
8
2
4
17
4
2
10
6
7
35
*Performance measure
contains items/tasks with
the following Level/DoK
distribution: DoK 1 = 23%
DoK 2 & 3 = 77%
37
Multiple Choice Items
•
•
•
•
Stem (question) with four (4) answer choices
Typically worth one (1) point towards overall score
On the new PSSA there are MC questions with two answers
Generally require about one (1) minute to answer,
depending on rigor/DoK
Pros
• Easy to administer
• Objective scoring
Cons
• Students can guess the correct answer
• No information can be gathered on the process the student
used to reach answer (error analysis)
38
Short Constructed Response Items
•
Requires students to apply knowledge, skills, and critical
thinking abilities to real-world performance tasks
• Entails students "constructing" or developing their own
answers in the form of a few sentences or bullet points,
a graphic organizer, or a drawing/diagram with
explanation
• Worth 1-3 points
Pros
•
•
•
Allows for partial credit
Provides more details about a student’s cognitive process
Reduces the likelihood of guessing
Cons
• Greater scoring subjectivity
• Requires more time to administer and score
39
Extended Constructed Response
Items
•
Requires students to apply knowledge, skills, and critical
thinking abilities to real-world performance tasks by developing
their own answers in the form of narrative text with supporting
graphic organizers and/or illustrations
• Worth 4 or more points
• Entails more in-depth explanations than SCR items
Pros
• Allows for partial credit
• Provides more details about a student’s cognitive process
• Reduces the likelihood of guessing
Cons
• Greater scoring subjectivity
• Requires more time to administer and score
40
Depth of Knowledge is…
• The complexity of mental processing that must occur in
order to construct an answer
• A critical factor in determining item/task rigor
Level
Example of Verb
Example of Task
DoK Level 1
Recall
List three characteristics of
metamorphic rocks.
DoK Level 2
Compare/Contrast
Describe the difference
between metamorphic and
igneous rocks.
DoK Level 3
Create
Develop a model to represent
the rock cycle.
DoK Level 4
Construct
Using multiple sources,
develop an essay on the rise of
the Industrial Revolution.
41
Depth of Knowledge Chart
DoK
Level
1
2
Definition
Involves recall and the response
is automatic. Activities require
students to demonstrate a rote
response, follow a set of
procedures, or perform simple
calculations.
Activities are more complex and
require students to engage in
mental processing and reasoning
beyond a habitual response.
These activities make students
decide how to approach a
problem.
Activities necessitate higher
cognitive demands. Students are
providing support and reasons
for conclusions they draw.
3
Typically, Level 3 activities have
more than one correct response
or approach to the problem.
Verbs
Examples
define, duplicate, list, memorize,
recall, repeat, reproduce, state,
classify, describe, discuss, explain,
identify, locate, recognize, report,
select, paraphrase





Identify the main character.
Subtract the numbers.
Label the rivers on the map.
Measure the length of your desk.
List the steps in the water cycle.
choose, demonstrate, dramatize,
employ, illustrate, interpret, operate,
schedule, sketch, solve, use, write,
appraise, compare, contrast, criticize,
differentiate, discriminate,
distinguish, examine, experiment,
question, test


Summarize the events in the story.
Describe the cause/effect of an
event.
Organize the data using a bar
graph.
Formulate a problem given data.
Compare and contrast the main
characters from the stories.
Support your ideas with details
and examples.
Design investigations for a
scientific problem.
Construct a model of the solar
system.
Using the graph, predict how many
teeth would be lost by all the 2nd
grade classes in the school and
justify your answer.



appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, 
support, value, evaluate, assemble,
construct, create, design, develop,

formulate, write


42
Process Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Review content standards from completed Targeted Content
Standards Template and insert content strand(s) into specification
table.
Determine the number of items by item type (i.e., Multiple Choice,
Short Constructed Response, Extended Constructed Response) for
each content strand.
Ensure item type and cognitive level (I, II, III)/depths of knowledge
(DoK) are assigned.
Assign item weights to each item type.
Assign number of passages (by type) when using literary works.
43
QA Checklist
• There is a sufficient sampling of targeted standards.
• The specifications reflect a balance between
developmental readiness and time constraints.
• Time is considered for both educators and students.
• The cognitive demands reflect those articulated in the
targeted standards.
• The measure allows for both objective and subjective
scoring procedures.
• The measure consists of 35-50 points with the Level I/DoK
I limited to one-third of the items/tasks.
44
Blueprints
• Content ID #
• Content Statement
• Item Depth of Knowledge (DoK)
• Performance measures should reflect a variety of DoK
levels.
• Sufficient sampling of content standards
• Aim for a 3:1 item to standard ratio (3 items for every
standard).
• Cognitive load
• Aim for a balance of DoK levels among standards.
• Design measures with at least 50% DoK 2 or higher.
45
Blueprint Example
Standard/
Content
ID
8.EE.1
8.EE.2
A-CED.1
Content Statement
Know and apply the properties of integer
exponents to generate equivalent numerical
expressions.
Use square root and cube root symbols to
represent solutions to equations of the form x2
= p and x3 = p, where p is a positive rational
number. Evaluate square roots of small perfect
squares and cube roots of small perfect cubes.
Create equations and inequalities in one
variable and use them to solve problems.
Item
Count
DoK DoK DoK
1
2
3
2
1
0
1
2
0
2
0
5
1
2
2
46
Process Steps
1. List the standards by number and statement in
the appropriate columns. Remember to aim
for a 3:1 item to standard ratio.
2. Decide on the item count for each standard
and fill in the appropriate column.
3. Determine the number of DoKs for each
standard following the specified guidelines for
“rigor.”
4. Repeat Steps 1-3 ensuring that item and DoK
counts meet the specification requirements.
47
QA Checklist
• The blueprint lists the content standard ID
number.
• The blueprint lists or references the targeted
content standards.
• The blueprint designates item counts for each
standard.
• The blueprint reflects a range of DoK levels.
• The blueprint item/task distribution reflects that
in the specification tables.
48
QA Checklist
• All items/tasks articulated on the blueprint are
represented within the Scoring Key.
• MC items have been validated to ensure only one
correct answer among the possible options
provided exists.
• MC answers do not create a discernible pattern.
• MC answers are “balanced” among the possible
options.
• Scoring Key answers are revalidated after the final
operational form reviews are complete.
49
Scoring Rubrics
50
Holistic vs. Analytic Rubric Scoring
Holistic Scoring
• Provides a single score based on an overall
determination of the student’s performance
• Assesses a student’s response as a whole for the overall
quality
• Most difficult to calibrate with different raters
Analytic Scoring
• Identifies and assesses specific aspects of a response
• Multiple dimension scores are assigned
• Provides a logical combination of subscores to the
overall assigned score
51
Rubric Scoring Considerations
• Describe whether spelling and/or grammar
will impact the final score.
• Avoid using words like “many,” “some,” and
“few” without adding numeric descriptors to
quantify these terms.
• Avoid using words that are subjective, such as
“creativity” or “effort.”
• Avoid subjective adjectives such as
“excellent” or “inadequate.”
52
SCR Rubric Example
General Scoring Rubric
The response gives evidence of a complete
understanding of the problem. It is fully developed
2 points
and clearly communicated. All parts of the problem
are complete. There are no errors.
The response gives evidence of a reasonable approach
but also indicates gaps in conceptual understanding.
1 point
Parts of the problem may be missing. The explanation
may be incomplete.
There is no response, or the work is completely
0 points
incorrect or irrelevant.
53
SCR Rubric Example
Sample Response: “In two complete sentences, explain why
people should help save the rainforests.”
The student’s response is written in complete
sentences and contains two valid reasons for saving
the rainforest.
2 points “People must save the rainforest to save the
animals’ homes. People need to save the rainforest
because we get ingredients for many medicines
from there.”
The student’s response contains only one reason.
1 point “People should save the rainforest because it is
important and because people and animals need it.”
54
Rubrics for ECR Tasks
 Create content-based descriptions of the expected
answer for each level of performance on the
rubric.
 Provide an example of a fully complete/correct
response along with examples of partially correct
responses.
 Reference the item expectations in the rubric.
 Make the rubric as clear and concise as possible so
that other scorers would assign exact/adjacent
scores to the performance/work under
observation.
55
ECR Rubric Example
General Scoring Rubric
4 points
3 points
2 points
1 point
0 points
The response provides all aspects of a complete interpretation and/or a correct solution.
The response thoroughly addresses the points relevant to the concept or task. It provides
strong evidence that information, reasoning, and conclusions have a definite logical
relationship. It is clearly focused and organized, showing relevance to the concept, task, or
solution process.
The response provides the essential elements of an interpretation and/or a solution. It
addresses the points relevant to the concept or task. It provides ample evidence that
information, reasoning, and conclusions have a logical relationship. It is focused and
organized, showing relevance to the concept, task, or solution process.
The response provides a partial interpretation and/or solution. It somewhat addresses the
points relevant to the concept or task. It provides some evidence that information,
reasoning, and conclusions have a relationship. It is relevant to the concept and/or task,
but there are gaps in focus and organization.
The response provides an unclear, inaccurate interpretation and/or solution. It fails to
address or omits significant aspects of the concept or task. It provides unrelated or
unclear evidence that information, reasoning, and conclusions have a relationship. There
is little evidence of focus or organization relevant to the concept, task, and/or solution
process.
The response does not meet the criteria required to earn one point. The student may have
written on a different topic or written "I don't know."
56
ECR Rubric Example
Sample Response: “List the steps of the Scientific Method. Briefly explain each one.”
1.
4 points
3 points
2 points
1 point
0 points
Ask a Question- Ask a question about something that you observe: How, What, When, Who, Which,
Why, or Where?
2. Do Background Research- Use library and Internet research to help you find the best way to do
things.
3. Construct a Hypothesis- Make an educated guess about how things work.
4. Test Your Hypothesis- Do an experiment.
5. Analyze Your Data and Draw a Conclusion- Collect your measurements and analyze them to see if
your hypothesis is true or false.
6. Communicate Your Results- Publish a final report in a scientific journal or by presenting the results
on a poster.
1. Ask a Question
2. Do Background Research-Use library and Internet research.
3. Construct a Hypothesis- An educated guess about how things work.
4. Test Your Hypothesis- Do an experiment.
5. Analyze Your Data and Draw a Conclusion
6. Communicate Your Results
1. Ask a Question
2. Do Background Research
3. Construct a Hypothesis
4. Test Your Hypothesis
5. Analyze Your Data and Draw a Conclusion
6. Communicate Your Results
Ask a Question, Hypothesis, Do an Experiment, Analyze Your Data
“I don’t know.”
57
QA Checklist
• CR items/tasks have scoring rubrics that reflect a performance
continuum.
• CR items/tasks include sample responses for each level of
performance.
• CR scoring rubrics are clear and concise.
• CR scoring rubrics include all dimensions (aspects) of the tasks
presented to the students.
• CR scoring rubrics avoid including non-cognitive (motivation,
effort, etc.) or content irrelevant attributes.
• Don’t use a rubric if a checklist or simpler tool will do!
58
Back to the SLO template…
SLO Template Steps:
Teacher
5. Teacher Expectations
5a. Level
Failing
0% to ___ % of
students will meet the
PI targets.
Needs Improvement
___% to ___% of
students will meet the
PI targets.
Proficient
___% to ___% of
students will meet the PI
targets.
Distinguished
___% to 100% of
students will meet the PI
targets.
.
Teacher Signature _________________________Date______ Evaluator Signature _____________________Date______
Notes/Explanation
5b. Elective
Rating
Distinguished (3)
Proficient (2)
Needs Improvement (1)
Failing (0)
.
Teacher Signature _________________________Date______ Evaluator Signature _____________________Date______
Describes the number of
students expected to meet the
performance indicator criteria.
5a: Proficient
85% to 94% of students meet
the performance indicator.
5a: Proficient
85% to 94% of this audience
can explain the SLO process to
their stakeholders!
SLO Online
Resources
Available
Templates
Available
Rubrics
pdesas.org
IU8
Curriculum
Network wiki
Homeroom
IU8 Wiggio
(Online support
group)
IV. Key Points for
School Leaders
Key Process Points
The SLO process
facilitates a conversation
about expectation
between educators
(principals and teachers)
Key Points (3)
• What is the subject
or content focus?
• Who does it
encompass?
• How can it improve
instruction and
educator practice?
GoalsStandards
• Are they high
quality measures?
• Who administers
and scores the
measures?
• What are the
expectations for
students?
Performance
Measures
• What are indicators of
success?
• How are they being
measured?
• Upon which students
are they based?
Indicators
IV. Areas of Caution
1. The SLO is based upon small numbers
of students/data points.
2. Goals and indicators are linked to
standards.
3. Indicators are vague without specific
performance criteria.
4. Growth and/or mastery is not clearly
defined
5. Performance measures are not well
designed or lack rigor.
6. Overall student achievement
expectations are extreme.
IV. Generic Process Steps:
Leader
1. Establish SLO template
completion timeline ASAP
2. Review complete template
3. Conduct review meeting with
teacher
4. Agree on any revisions; submit
materials
5. Establish “mid-cycle” spot
review
6. End-of-Year review with
supporting data
V. Action Planning
•
•
•
•
Implementation Timeline
Roles for administrative team
Professional development for teacher
Repurposing your schedule for job embedded SLO
activities
– SLO creation (Design, Build, Review)
– Resource investigations
– Time to work in grade level/content area teams
• Support systems for teachers from administrators
and peers
Contact Info
CURRICULUM
Janel Vancas, Acting
Assistant Director
[email protected]
Laura J. Toki, Director
[email protected]
ED PROGRAMS
Jennifer Anderson,
Assistant Director
[email protected]
Frequently Asked Questions
What are the definitions of “tested,” “non-tested?”
Tested: Teachers with Eligible PVAAS Score
(20% Elective)
A PA certified educator with full or partial responsibility
for content specific instruction of the assessed eligible
content as measured by a Grade 4-8 PSSA or Keystone
Exam.
Non-tested: Teachers without Eligible PVAAS Score
(35% Elective)
Teachers who do not teach courses
assessed by Grade 4-8 PSSA or Keystone
exams.
Who develops the SLO? Is this an individual effort or a
collaborative effort?
Each educator will be responsible to develop SLOs as
required by the LEA. Collaborative development of SLOs is
encouraged (e.g., similar content area or grade level
teachers, interdisciplinary groups of educators,
collaboration through professional organizations educators,
etc.). A PDE approved SLO Template is provided to help
guide educators and administrators through the process.
How will the final SLO measure be translated into a “score”
that can be applied to the 20% or 35% of a teacher’s
evaluation?
This formula and computation process is
currently under development by PDE
and will be published in the PA Bulletin by
June 30, 2013.
What is the SLO template and process designed to address
in terms of instructional delivery time, number of students, or
size of the objective?
SLOs can be written to address the entire length of a grade
or course, but could be tailored to a focused time period.
Student achievement for large or select groups of students
can be described. The template is designed to address a
grade or course plan but could be used to address a
meaningful, focused instructional objective or focused
teaching practice.
Will PDE recommend some performance measures and
scoring tools?
Model SLOs for a variety of content areas will
be provided, utilizing a variety of performance
measures and scoring tools. These models
can be used as is or can be modified.
How many SLOs per teacher/per year/per
grade? What about “co-taught” classes,
teachers who travel between schools, and other
unique instructional scenarios?
Policy and guidelines on these issues are yet to
be determined.
How will the SLO process be monitored?
A principal or LEA-assigned evaluator would
monitor the SLO process, including (but not
limited to) the timeline for development,
approval for the SLO to be implemented and
verification of the measure of educator
effectiveness based on the completion of the
SLO. Tools are currently being developed to
assist principals toward efficiently and
effectively monitoring this process.
How do “goals” and “performance indicators differ?
The Goal Statement should address important learning
content to be measured, and the performance indicators
should describe expected levels of achievement.
If a school is already having conversations about SLO
and is having success, is it necessary to fill out this
template or can we continue what we are doing?
State regulations say that “LEAs shall use an SLO to
document the process to determine and validate the
weight assigned to the Elective Data measures
that establish the Elective Rating.”
When will LEAs be expected to implement SLOs?
Models will be available for school year 2013-2014, and
LEAs have the option to use SLOs as a component for
measuring educator effectiveness in school year 201314. LEAs will be expected to implement SLOs in school
year 2014-2015. First year teachers will not be expected
to implement SLOs.
What supports will be available to teachers and districts
to develop and implement rigorous SLOs?
An online training program and process/
definitions manual will be provided, as will
an up-to-date template and content-specific
models. Anticipated availability of these
supports is August 2013.
Your Questions?

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