European Diploma in Optometry

Report
European Qualifications in
Optometry and Optics
Istanbul 25 May 2013
Robert Chappell OBE MPhil DSc FCOptom
Chairman, European Diploma Board of
Management
1
Where are we now?
• One of the goals of ECOO is to harmonise and
develop educational standards and the scope of
practice for optometry and optics.
• We have a European Diploma in Optometry – set at
the highest standard for Europe
• This has influenced and developed profession &
optometry education
• We are developing a qualification in Optics - set at
a common entry standard for Europe
2
Optometry and Optics in Europe
• Economic conditions vary from country to country
• Scope of practice varies enormously
• Education at different levels
– University
– Hand Craft System
• No harmonisation
3
A Ladder of Qualification
Optometrist Pathology
Diagnostic Therapeutics
drugs
prescribing
Optometrist
Dispensing
Eye
Optician examinations
Glazing
Optical
technicians production
Optical
Support
Staff
Supply of
spectacles
Treatment of
Ocular disease
Refraction
Contact Lenses
Recognition of
ocular anomalies
Referral
4
WCO Categories of Optometric Services
1.
Optical
Technology
Services
2.
Visual
Function
Services
3.
Ocular
Diagnostic
Services
-------------------------------
a) without drugs
dispensing
dispensing
refraction
prescription
dispensing
refraction
prescription
screening for
eye disease
4.
Ocular
Therapeutic
Services
------------------------------
b) with drugs
dispensing
refraction
prescription
diagnosis of
eye disease
using DPA’s
(diagnostics)
dispensing
refraction
prescription
diagnosis of
eye disease
using DPA’s
(diagnostics)
treatment of
eye disease
using TPA’s
(therapeutics)
dispensing
refraction
prescription
diagnosis of
eye disease
using DPA’s
(diagnostics)
treatment of
eye disease
using TPA’s
(therapeutics)
eye surgery
using laser
© Feike Grit 2006
5
Scope of Practice of Optics and Optometry
Box 1
Turkey
Box 2
Belgium
France
Iceland
Italy
Box 3
Austria
Czech Rep
Denmark
Germany
Spain
Switzerland
Box 4
Finland
Ireland
Netherlands
Norway
Sweden?
Box 5
Australia
Canada
New Zealand
Nigeria
UK
US
OPTICIAN
REFRACTING
OPTICIAN
OPTOMETRIST
OPTOMETRIST
OPTOMETRIST
DOCTOR OF
OPTOMETRY
dispensing
dispensing
refraction
prescription
dispensing
refraction
prescription
screening for
eye disease
dispensing
refraction
prescription
diagnosis of
eye disease
using DPA’s
(diagnostics)
dispensing
refraction
prescription
diagnosis of
eye disease
using DPA’s
(diagnostics)
treatment of
eye disease
using TPA’s
(therapeutics)
© Feike Grit 2010
6
The European Diploma in Optometry
• European syllabus
• Set at highest entry level of any European Country
• Political value
– To establish a high standard of optometric practice
– Possible harmonisation in the future
• Educational Value
– To encourage the raising of educational standards
– To meet the requirements of the Bologna Declaration
7
The Competency Based ED –
24 Subjects covering the knowledge
base and clinical competencies
1.
Geometrical Optics
13. Paediatric Optometry
2.
Physical Optics
14. Refractive Surgery
3.
Visual Optics
15. Anatomy & Histology
4.
Visual Perception
16. Neuroscience
5.
Optical Appliances
17. General Physiol. & Biochemistry
6.
Occupational Optics
18. General Microbiology & Immunity
7.
Vision and Aging
19. General Pharmacology
8.
Refraction
20. Pathology &General Medical Disorders
9.
Low Vision
21. Epidemiology & Biostatistics
10. Ocular Motility and B.V.
22. Ocular Anatomy & Physiology
11. Contact Lenses
23. Ocular Pharmacology
12. Investigative Techniques
24. Abnormal Ocular Conditions
8
The European Diploma in Optometry
Structure
•
Part A Visual Perception and Optical technology
– 1. visual perception
– 2. optics
– 3. optical appliances
•
Part B Management of Visual Problems
– 1. refraction
– 2. binocular vision
– 3. contact lenses
•
Part C General Health and Ocular Abnormality
– 1. biology
– 2. ocular biology
– 3. ocular abnormality
•
Portfolio of Clinical Experience
9
The Benefits
• Ahead of its time – Bologna
• Promotes educational development
• Promotes co-operation between educators
• Promotes expansion of scope of practice
• Recognised by GOC and Switzerland
10
The Problems
• Difficult big bang examination
• Lack of preparation of candidates
• Low pass rate
• No accreditation for prior learning
• Small take up limited number of countries
• Only three languages
• Private examination – limited national recognition
• No incentive for many countries to participate
11
The Future
• Accreditation of prior learning
• Accreditation of national qualifications
• Top up examinations
• European qualification in optics
• Achieving a common European platform
• A ladder of qualification
12
Why an ECOO Accreditation scheme?
•
All European Optometry/Optics programmes can be compared
against the same bench mark, the European Diploma
•
There is a rationale for offering exemptions from parts, or all, the
European Diploma Examinations to graduates of appropriate
programmes.
•
National “competent authorities” might find it easier to evaluate
the training of applicants from another EU country – this will help
to facilitate the free movement of professionals
•
Training Institutions are encouraged to match their programmes
to the competency based European Diploma – this will help to
harmonise Optometry and Optics within Europe
13
An Accreditation Scheme for
European Optometry and Optics
• Emphasis is on learning outcomes.
• The competency based European Diploma Syllabus
is used as a self assessment document by the
training institutions
• The institutions indicate where the skills, attitudes,
and underpinning knowledge of the competencies
are taught and how these are assessed
14
Accreditation and
Bench Marking
• The Scheme can be used in two ways
– Full Accreditation
• The self assessment form is analysed and a
preliminary opinion on recognition is given
• A full visit takes place and a final recommendation
is made
– Benchmarking
• The institution dose not proceed with the visit but
uses the preliminary opinion as the basis for
developing their course to Diploma standards
15
The Accreditation Scheme
1.
The Competency Based ED - 24 Subjects covering
the knowledge base and clinical competencies An
institution enquires about accreditation for their qualification
2.
A copy of the guidelines is sent to them
3.
An preliminary meeting is held to discuss the process
4.
The self assessment form is completed and analysed
5.
Following the analysis further discussions take place
6.
A three day visit to the institution takes place
7.
A recommendation on the level of accreditation is made to
ECOO
16
Accreditation Applicants
• Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic
– Visited November 2011
• Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz, Olten,
Switzerland
– Visited October 2011
• Buskerud University College, Kongsberg, Norway
– Visit due March 2012
• Beuth Hochchule, Berlin, Germany
– Delayed until first students graduate from new course
17
What a Qualification in Optics should be for
ECOO
• Developed at a basic level to encompass the
reality for opticians
• In line with WCO categories
• Should complement not conflict with the work of
the European Diploma
• Should be awarded by accreditation only
• So.....
18
Ladder of progression
European
Diploma in
Optometry
European Diploma
Framework
European Qualification
in Optics
Framework
....?
Part B
European
Qualifications
in Optics
Part A
Part A
Accreditation process
Part C
19
Proposed Structure of EQO
•
Includes Part A of the European Diploma
•
Subject 1: Geometrical Optics
•
Subject 2: Physical Optics
•
Subject 3: Visual Optics
•
Subject 4: Optical appliances
•
Subject 5: Occupational optics
•
Extension of workshop practice
•
A basic understanding of visual optics and refraction
•
A basic understanding of contact lenses
•
A basic understanding of ocular anatomy and ocular disorders
•
A basic understanding of low vision
•
Communication skills
•
Business management (Commercial skills/Practice management?)
20
What are the Benefits for Turkey
• Compare your syllabus with the European Standard
• Educational tool
• Political tool
• Increase opportunities to increase scope of practice
• Greater professional satisfaction
• Provide better eye care for the public
• Increased freedom of movement and practise
throughout Europe
21

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