Imagery, Symbolism, Atmosphere, Personification, Irony

Report
Groups 3 & 6
By Nora, Krsna, and Katie
Imagery
● Use of figurative language to represent objects
and ideas in an appeal to the physical senses
o Concrete - descriptive language not extending beyond the
literal meaning
o Abstract - descriptions of sensations that have no
physical parallel, such as ideas
o “The Worn Path” - Phoenix Jackson had curls that
smelled like copper
Symbolism
● The use of symbols - objects, actions, or
events which create associations, elicit
moods or emotions, or represent other
things
o
o
White doves as symbols of peace
A black cat as a symbol of misfortune
Atmosphere
● The predominant mood or tone of a piece
which evokes a particular feeling in the
reader
o
Edgar Allan Poe - atmosphere of doom, gloom,
dread - “Once upon a midnight dreary…”
Personification
● Giving human attributes to inanimate
objects
o
Macbeth
 Sleep no more! Macbeth doth Murder sleep.
● Pathetic Fallacy
o
o
when the weather reflects the situation
Macbeth
 The night had been unruly...Lamentings heard
i’ th’ air, strange screams of death
Personification
● Synecdoche
o
o
a part represents a whole or vice versa
Hamlet
 So the whole ear of Denmark is by a forged process
of my death rankly abused
● Metonymy
o
o
substitution of an attribute for a name
Julius Caesar
 Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears
Irony
● Verbal
o
o
a person says one thing but means another
Julius Caesar
 Brutus is an honorable man
● Structural
o
o
unreliable narrator
A Modest Proposal
 Swift isn’t really suggesting to eat infants
Irony
● Dramatic/Tragic
o
o
audience has more knowledge than characters
Othello
 we know Iago is lying but Othello doesn’t
● Cosmic
o
o
a higher power plays with humanity’s fate
Romeo and Juliet
 a plague stops Romeo from getting the message
Review
In The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne,
a meteor traces the letter “A” in the night sky.
This is primarily an example of:
A. Personification
B. Symbolism
C. Imagery
D.Irony
Review
In 1984 by George Orwell, the protagonist
describes the future as “a boot stamping on a
human face— forever”. This is used to create:
A. Irony
B. Symbolism
C. Imagery
D.Atmosphere
Review
In “A Worn Path” by Eudora Welty, Phoenix
Jackson stating that her grandson is still alive
may be an example of:
A. Verbal Irony
B. Structural Irony
C. Dramatic Irony
D.Cosmic Irony

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