Regional Presentations FY2014 Navajo

Report
Navajo Nation Priorities
Presented here are the Navajo Nation FY 2014 Budget of Indian Affairs and
Bureau of Indian Education budget priorities:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Public Safety and Justice
Human Services
Education
Natural Resources Management
The Navajo Nation priorities are based upon the need to enhance and sustain
the cultural, economic, social and governmental vitality of the Navajo people.
A government-to-government relationship exists between the Navajo Nation
and the U.S. government. This relationship is based upon our sacred Treaty of
1868 with the U.S. government, the Snyder Act of 1921, the Indian SelfDetermination and Education Assistance Act, as amended and other similar
federal laws, which authorize federal appropriations to the Navajo Nation for
the benefit of the Navajo people.
Law Enforcement Patrol
Criminal Statistics – FY 2011
Part I – Felony
3,787
Part II – Misdemeanor
204,866
Total
208,653
Annual Arrest:
28,977
Violent Crime:
Property Crime:
2,689
Vandalism:
4,097
Disorder Conduct:
10,181
Drunkenness:
33,523
DWI:
6,479
Domestic Violence:
4,700
Call for Services:
250,000
Average Response Time (min)
25
Jail Beds
48
280 commissioned officers
cover an area of 27,000
square miles
1,098
Operational Information
Annual Budget:
$16,000,000
Actual Budget Need: $22,000,000
SHORTFALL:
$6,000,000
Tribal Courts
FY 2014 P.L. 93-638 BUDGET REQUEST: $3,423,000
The Judicial Branch provides stability in
the Navajo Nation government by
providing services through:
• Tribal Courts
• Peacemaking
• Probation & parole
Pursuant to Diné bi beenahaz’áanii, the
Judicial Branch has developed a justice
system that fully embodies the traditional
values and processes of the Navajo
People in accordance with Navajo Nation
laws, customs, traditions, and applicable
federal laws.
Human Services
The service area for the Navajo Nation P.L. 93-638 Social Services contract covers
the Navajo Nation and border towns.
Navajo 93-638 social workers 35:1
:
217
miles
The National Child Welfare
League of America 15:1.
:
332
miles
Social Services
Human Services
Housing Improvement Program
Project Accomplishments
Completed Projects
Before and After
No. of Projects
# of Applicants
693
684
626
584
509
8
1.1
million
8
1.0
million
509
10
22
13
2.3
million
1.0
million
1.5
million
44
2.6
million
The Housing Improvement Program is NOT a duplication of HUD NAHASDA.
NAHASDA has income requirements – HIP serves the neediest individuals that have no other
alternative for housing.
HIP typically serves elderly and handicapped individuals needing homes and improvements
Human Services
Welfare Assistance
•
•
•
•
•
Navajo 93-638 Social Services considers
the use of welfare assistance funds as
“Family Support Assistance,” with the intent
to promote family unity.
Welfare assistance funds are utilized when
no other comparable services are available.
Welfare assistance funds prevent eligible
Navajo families from “falling through the
cracks,” when in need of financial assistance
and residential care.
Family reunification and deinstitutionalization are goals when
purchasing residential care services for
children, youth, adults, and elderly.
All welfare assistance services are offered to
eligible Navajos in a context of cultural
relevancy.
“Family Support Assistance”
Education
FY 2014 Budget Request
 $34.7 million additional
funds requested;
2009-2012 Total Applicants
20,000
18,000
17,291
17,395
17,001
 $12.2 annually is not
sufficient to support the
increasing number of
students that apply for
funding every year; and
16,000
14,000
12,000
10,000
8,000
6,000
5,436
 Cost of education is also
consistently rising.
Additional funds are needed
to support the increasing
cost of inflation.
5,266
4,000
2,000
0
2010
Total Applicants
2011
2012
Students Funded from Federal Funds
Johnson-O’Malley Program
In fiscal year 2012:
• Conducted 31 public school district fiscal and
programmatic monitoring in Ariz., N.M. and Utah;
• Increased student enrollment;
• Provided supplemental funding (25 CFR) to
schools to meet unique and specialized
opportunities:
According to the U.S.
Census Bureau almost
70 percent of Navajos
speak their tribal
language in the home.
In contrast, only 30
percent of Native
Americans as a whole
speak their own tribal
language in the home.
Tutoring, educational field
trips
Increased attendance and
academic performance
At-risk counseling
Summer school
Promoted native studies
including language and
culture preservation
Required school items
Resource Management
• Navajo Indian Irrigation Project
o Under P.L. 87-483 the Federal Government promised to fully fund NIIP
o The Navajo Nation gave up water rights as a part of this deal
o NIIP should be fully funded at $26 m per year to fulfill the federal
government obligation
• Bennett Freeze should be funded under its own line item
not as part of Natural Resource Management
o Fund under a separate line item (as was done in 2011) for $1.2 m
Conclusion
• The Navajo Nation has an obligation to serve the needs
of it’s citizens just as the federal government has an
obligation to fulfill its trust responsibility
• For this reason the Navajo Nation requests:
o Contract Support (TPA) costs need to be fully funded
(currently at 85%)
o Tribal Grant Contract Support costs need to be fully
funded (currently at 65%)
• Native Nations should be considered in practice
MANDATORY/NON DISCRETIONARY FUNDING not
subject to reductions under the Deficit Reduction Act.
• Treaty obligations are not discretionary they are legal
compacts.

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