Drug_Information_Cen..

Report
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Define drug information and related terms
History of drug information
Drug information center goals
ASHP effective provider of drug information
The pharmacist role
Considerations of DIC
Systematic method for responding to requests
Documentation and quality assessment of drug
information requests
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Drug Information is the provision of unbiased, wellreferenced, and critically evaluated information on any
aspect of pharmacy practice
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Drug Information Center is to provide a system for
the organization and dissemination of drug information
(Francke 1965)
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Drug Informatics emphasizes the use of technology
as an integral tool in effectively organizing, analyzing and
managing information on medications
Yousif Abdu Asiri, The Difference Between Drug Information Center (DIC) and Poison Control Center (PCC).Power
Point Presentation
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1960s
Development of the term ‘’drug information’’
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1962
First drug information center at the
University of Kentucky Medical Center, USA
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1964
Conference on Drug Information Services
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1967
The ‘’Drug Information Specialist’’
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1975
The Millis Commission Report, AACP described
the main function of pharmacists as providers
of drug information
Yousif Abdu Asiri, The Difference Between Drug Information Center (DIC) and Poison Control Center (PCC).Power
Point Presentation
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To stimulate the effective use of drug information
resources by pharmacists, physicians, and other health
care professionals
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To educate pharmacy students to serve as effective
providers of drug information
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To provide an organized database of specialized
information on drug therapeutics to meet the drug
information needs of practitioners
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To expand the role of the pharmacist in providing
drug information services to the hospital and
community
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To promote patient care through rational drug therapy
by the improved availability and use of drug
information
1. Perceive and evaluate the medication
information needs of patients and families, health
care professionals, and other personnel
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
2. Use a systematic approach to address
medication information needs by effectively:
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Searching literature
Retrieving literature
Evaluating literature
Appropriately communicating information
Applying the information to the patient care situation
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
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Providing medication information to patients & families,
health care professionals, and other personnel
2.
Establishing and maintaining a formulary based on
scientific evidence of efficacy and safety, cost, and
patient factors
3.
Developing and participating in efforts to prevent
medication misadventuring, including adverse drug
event and medication error reporting and analysis
programs
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
4.
Developing methods of changing patient and provider
behaviors to support optimal medication use
5.
Publishing newsletters to educate patients, families, and
health care professionals on medication use
6.
Educating providers about medication-related policies
and procedures
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
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Coordinating programs to support population based
medication practices (e.g. development of medicationuse evaluation criteria and pharmacotherapeutic
guidelines)
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Coordinating investigational drug services
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Providing continuing-education services to the
healthcare professional staff
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
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Educating pharmacy students and residents
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Applying health economic and outcome analysis
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Developing and maintaining an active research program
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
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Hospital based
Industry based
Community based
Yousif Abdu Asiri, The Difference Between Drug Information Center (DIC) and Poison Control Center (PCC).Power
Point Presentation
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Telephone: the lines should be designed to allow
immediate, direct access to the center
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Computers
3.
Fax machine
4.
Printer
5.
Copier machine
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Databases are available for information management,
retrieval, and communication
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Information management databases include software for
MUE, documentation of questions and responses, and
preparation of reports of adverse drug events
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Information retrieval sources include bibliographic
databases (e.g., International Pharmaceutical Abstracts,
Iowa Drug Information Service, MEDLINE) and full-text
databases (e.g., Drug Information Fulltext)
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Textbooks (e.g., AHFS Drug Information) and journals
can also be accessed through computer technology
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Some information is available through electronic bulletin
boards (e.g., PharmNet) and the Internet
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Computerized medical records can also be a valuable
tool in assessing either individual patient needs or
population-based needs
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It should be close to the pharmacy department to
allow both pharmacy staff & other healthcare
providers to reach it easily
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A sign or label on the door the to specify who will
be allowed to enter the DIC room
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It can be inside the pharmacy department
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Specific Criteria:
◦ Pharm.D degree, MS degree, BS degree with
specialized training in drug information center,
experience minimum 1-2 years, residency, fellowship
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General Criteria :
◦ Computers skills
◦ The person should be cooperative, confident,
accurate, good English language
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Types of Resources:
◦ Tertiary Resources (textbooks, review articles)
◦ Secondary Resources (index and abstract primary
resources with the goal of directing user to primary
resources)
◦ Primary resources (journals)
 Not all articles are considered primary resources !!!
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It is the responsibility of the pharmacist to ensure that
up-to-date resources are available
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Pharmacists should be familiar with not only the
components of the literature (e.g. primary) but also the
features of individual resources in each component
◦ this makes searching more efficient so that time can be
used optimally in analyzing, applying, & communicating
the information
1. Consider the education and professional or experiential
background of the requester
2. Identify needs by asking probing questions or by
examining the medical record to identify the true question.
Assess the urgency for a response
3. Classify requests as patient-specific or not and by type of
question to aid in assessing the situation and selecting
resources
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
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Product availability,
Adverse drug event
Compatibility
Compounding/formulation
Dosage/administration
Drug interaction
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Identification
Pharmacokinetics
therapeutic use/efficacy
Safety in pregnancy and
nursing
Toxicity and poisoning
Articles/Reviews
4. Obtain more complete background information, including
patient data to individualize the response to meet the
patient’s, family’s, or health care professional’s needs
5. Perform a systematic search of the literature by making
appropriate selections from the primary, secondary, and
tertiary literature
6. Evaluate, interpret, and combine information from the
several sources. Other information needs should be
anticipated as a result of the information provided
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
7. Provide a response by written or oral consultation, or
both, as needed by the requester and appropriate to the
situation
8. Perform a follow-up assessment to determine the utility
of the information provided and outcomes for the patient
9. Document the request, information sources, response,
and follow-up as appropriate
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
1. Date and time received
2. Requester’s name, address, method of contact (e.g.,
telephone or beeper number), and category (e.g., health
care discipline, patient, public)
3. Person assessing medication information needs
4. Method of delivery (e.g., telephone, personal visit, mail).
5. Classification of request
6. Question asked
7. Patient-specific information obtained
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
8. Response provided
9. References used
10. Date and time answered
11. Person responding to request
12. Estimated time in preparation and for communication
13. Materials sent to requesters
14. Outcome measures suggested (e.g., impact on patient
care, improvements in medication use, and requester
satisfaction)
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
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Responses to requests for medication information
should be accurate, complete, and timely for:
◦ maximal clinical usefulness
◦ to establish credibility for pharmacist-provided
information
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
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Quality assessment of responses could be
selective for:
◦ certain types of patient-specific requests
◦ random by numbers of requests
◦ for certain time periods
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5
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It is the responsibility of the pharmacist to keep
abreast of advancements both
◦ in the tools that can be used to systematically address
information requests
And
◦ in the information itself regarding pharmacotherapeutic
or other issues affecting the practice of pharmacy
ASHP, Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 1996; 53:1843–5

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