MIAB Principal Eval SLOs

Report
RISE
Principal Evaluation and Development
System: Administrative Student Learning
Objectives
There are two major components to the RISE
evaluation system.
Professional
Practice
Summative
Evaluation
Rating
Student
Learning
2
The measures for Student Learning include the
School-wide Learning Measure and Student
Learning Objectives
2) Student Learning
Measure: School-wide Learning Measure (SWL)
Measure: Administrative Student Learning Objectives (SLO)
•
The School-wide Learning Measure will be calculated by the state, and
returned to schools as an A-F grade
3
Each principal will set two administrative Student
Learning Objectives, which are weighted equally.
Administrative Student Learning Objective
A growth or achievement goal focused on student learning, potentially
in specific areas/subjects, set to suit local needs
50%
Administrative
SLO
#1
50%
Administrative
SLO
#2
4
Administrative SLOs reflect flexibility within
guidelines.
Administrative SLOs must be
Administrative SLOs can be
• based on student learning
measures (student data).
• district or school based.
• measureable.
• collaboratively set by principal
and evaluator.
• growth or achievement.
• based on whole school or
subgroup populations.
5
Administrative and Teacher Student Learning
Objectives have similarities and differences
Teacher SLOs
•
•
•
•
Admin SLOs
• Based on
Two different types of
student
• Two SLOs of the same
SLOs: Class and Targeted learning
format
measures
Require grouping of
• The Targeted • Potentially looking at substudents by level of
groups of students in the
SLO and the
preparedness
data
Admin SLO
For Class SLO,
are both one- • Both SLOs are scored
performance levels
statement
jointly, based on a
differentiated by how
goals
exceed/pass/fail rubric
many students reach
• Progress
• There is a lot of flexibility
mastery
monitoring
in the measure used to
For Class SLO, there is happens
demonstrate student
strict guidance on the
throughout
learning
assessment used
year
6
There are five steps in the RISE Administrative
Student Learning Objective process.
1
Reference Data and District goals
2
Determine Appropriate Measures
3
Write Administrative Student Learning Objectives
4
Track Progress and Refine Strategies
5
Review Results and Score
7
The five steps are spread throughout the school
year.
Administrative Student Learning Objectives in RISE
Prior to Start of School -- Oct
Step 1:
Reference Data and District Goals
Step 2:
Determine Appropriate Measures
Nov-April
May-Sept
Step 4:
Track Progress
and Refine
Strategies
Step 5:
Review Results
and Score
Step 3:
Write Admin Student Learning Objectives
8
Step 1: Reference school/district data and goals
to help shape thinking on Administrative SLOs
A-F
grades
ISTEP/
ECA data
Subgroup
performance
School Improvement Plans
District-wide
goals and
initiatives
School Improvement
Plans
and
Start by analyzing the data
and goals at the school and
district levels. Consider
how your administrative
Student Learning
Objectives might best
address the needs of your
students while aligning with
current, data-based school
and district goals.
district-wide goals and initiatives
9
Step 2: More flexibility in choosing measures for
Admin SLOs than teacher Class SLO’s
Possible measures include, but
are not limited to:
• iRead K-2, 3
• ISTEP+
• LAS Links
• ECAs
• Acuity Predictive C
• mCLASS
• Common Assessments in Sci/SS
• NWEA
• AP data
• ACT/SAT suite of assessments
• Industry Certification Assessments
• Graduation rate
• For any measure: Consider the purpose, security, and rigor of the
measure. How will these factors affect or be affected by setting your
SLO around this measure?
• Non-examples for measures of administrative Student Learning Objectives:
attendance rates, discipline referral rates, survey results, etc.
10
Let’s look at steps 3-5 of the Administrative
Student Learning Objective process.
1
Reference Data and District Goals
2
Determine Appropriate Measures
3
Write Administrative Student Learning Objectives
4
Track Progress and Refine Strategies
5
Review Results and Score
11
Administrative SLOs are SMART goals focused
on student achievement and growth outcomes.
Specific
• You may set SLOs around district, school, or sub-group
populations using specific learning goals.
Measurable
• Measures were determined during Step 2 of the administrative SLO process.
Attainable
• It is important that the SLO be ambitious but attainable. Consider
the SLO from multiple angles to determine if it represents high
expectations, but remains realistic.
Relevant
• Relevancy established by Step 1, referencing school/district data and goals.
Time-Bound
• Administrative SLOs should be set for the duration of the school
year (ex: the 2012/13 school year).
12
Ambitious but achievable: An example
For example, although it would likely be ambitious for an administrator
at this school to set an SLO reflecting an ISTEP+ pass rate of 60%
for his/her ELL students for the 2012-13 school year, it is likely to be
unachievable in a single year.
74%
20%
• Because the scoring of the administrative SLOs is a pass/fail measure (unlike
the scoring of the Class SLO for teachers, which is broken out into
achievement at different performance levels), it is important that
administrators closely consider the data when setting their SLOs.
13
Recall: Administrative SLOs reflect flexibility
within guidelines.
Administrative SLOs must be
Administrative SLOs can be
• based on student learning
measures (student data).
• district or school based.
• measureable.
• collaboratively set by principal
and evaluator.
• growth or achievement.
• based on whole school or
subgroup populations.
14
Step 3: Writing Administrative SLOs - examples
Elementary/Middle School examples:
• At least 20 out of 35 English Learner students in grades 3-5 will
increase one or more proficiency levels on the LAS links assessment.
• The bottom 25% of grade 6-8 students, based on last year’s ISTEP+
scores, will increase their ISTEP ELA passing rates by 10%.
• 70% of K-2 students will score a proficient or above on IREADK-2.
District-wide example:
• From 2011/12 to 2012/13, the bottom 25% of students across the
corporation will increase passing rates on statewide, mandated
assessments by 5%.
15
Step 3: Writing Administrative SLOs - examples
High School examples:
• The graduation rate for the High School will raise at least 5%,
reaching 87% graduation rate by the end of the school year.
• The percentage of AP students scoring a 3, 4, or 5 on any AP test will
increase from 45% last year to 60% this year.
• Increase the number of 10th - 12th grade students gaining college
credit in dual credit courses from 20 to 35 by the end of the school
year.
• 85% of the 10th grade students will pass the Algebra 1 ECA.
District-wide example:
• 85% of English Language Learner students within the corporation will
increase one or more proficiency levels on the LAS links assessment.
16
Step 4: Evaluators and principals use conferences
to discuss progress towards the objective.
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Beginning of
year conference
Optional
Observation
Quarter 3
Required
Observation
Required
Observation
#1
#2
Optional
Observation
Quarter 4
End of year
conference
Optional
Observation
Mid-year conference
(optional)
Discuss progress towards
SLOs during postconferences
Discuss progress towards
SLOs during postconferences
Use, if needed, for more
formal conversation about
principal performance
17
Recall: Administrative SLOs are weighted 20% of
the overall, summative scoring
Principal Metrics
Admin.
SLOs, 20%
Rubric, 50%
A-F Grade,
30%
18
Step 5: The rubric for administrative Student
Learning Objectives measures if the administrator
met and/or exceeded their two SLOs
Admin. SLO
Exceeds both goals
Category
Highly Effective (HE)
Points
4
Meets both goals, may exceed one Effective (E)
3
Meets only one goal
Improvement Necessary (I)
2
Meets neither goal
Ineffective (IN)
1
It is important that, even when setting SLOs, both the principal and evaluator are
clear as to what meeting, exceeding, and failing to meet the goals expressed in
the SLOs looks like.
19

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