Student development and experiential learning impact

Report
Student Development
and Experiential
Learning Impact
UC San Diego
Experiential
Learning
Conference
Januar y 26 th ,
2012
SESSIONS
 From Community Service to Service Learning: Unlocking the
Educational Impact of Student Service Activities
Penny Rue
V i c e C h a n c e l l o r, S t u d e n t A f f a i r s
 Student Expectations and Workforce Realities: Experiential
Learning from an Employer Perspective
Andy Ceperley
A s s i s t a n t V i c e C h a n c e l l o r, E x p e r i e n t i a l L e a r n i n g
D i r e c to r, C a r e e r S e r vi c e s C e n te r
 Sixth College Practicum Assessment
Diane A. Forbes Ber thoud
P r a c t i c u m D i r e c to r, S i x t h C o l l e g e
Daisy Rodriguez
P r a c t i c u m P r o g r a m C o o r d i n a to r, S i x t h C o l l e g e
 Academic Integrity: Making Meaning from the Experience of
Cheating
Patricia Mahaffey
Dean of Student Affairs, Muir College
From Community Service
to Service Learning:
Unlocking the Educational
Impact of Student Service
Activities
Penny Rue, Ph.D.
Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs
University of California, San Diego
Corporation for National Service
P re s i d ent ’s H i g h er E d u c at i on C ommu ni t y Se r v i c e H onor Rol l
of Di s t i nc t i on: U n i ver s it y o f C a l i forni a, S a n D i e g o
 Scope, innovativeness, and evidence of effectiveness of the service
 Level of student participation in service activities
 The institution's Federal Work -Study community service participation
rate.
 Whether the institution has at least one fulltime staff member
responsible for coordinating student community service.
 Whether the institution provides scholarships as a reward for
service, such as "matching" the Segal AmeriCorps Education Award.
 The extent to which the institution offers academic service -learning
courses.
 Whether the institution requires service -learning courses as part of
the core curriculum of at least one major or discipline.
 Whether the institution rewards the use of
service-learning by faculty.
Chancellor’s Challenge Volunteer 50
Clinton Global Initiative –
University comes to UC San Diego
Chancellor funds
partnership
b et w e e n S t u d e n t
A f f ai r s a n d
Re s e a r c h A f f a i r s
to p a i r s t u d e n t s
w i t h f a c ul t y to
enact their
c o m m it m e n t s
What Service-Learning Looks Like
 If students collect trash out of an urban stream bed, they are
providing a valued service to the community as volunteers. If
students collect trash from an urban stream bed, analyze their
findings to determine the possible sources of pollution, and share
the results with residents of the neighborhood, they are engaging
in service-learning.
 In the service-learning example, in addition to providing an
important service to the community, students are learning about
water quality and laboratory analysis, developing an
understanding of pollution issues, and practicing communications
skills. They may also reflect on their personal and career interests
in science, the environment, public policy or other related areas.
Both the students and the community have been involved in a
transformative experience.
Wingspread’s Principles of Good Practice
for Combining Service and Learning
1.
An ef fective program engages people in responsible and challenging
actions for the common good.
2. An ef fective program provides structured oppor tunities for people to
reflect critically on their ser vice experience.
3. An ef fective program ar ticulates clear ser vice and learning goals for
ever yone involved.
4. An ef fective program allows for those with needs to define those needs.
5. An ef fective program clarifies the responsibilities of each per son and
organization involved.
6. An ef fective program matches ser vice providers and ser vice needs through
a process that recognizes changing circumstances.
7. An ef fective program expects genuine, active, and sustained
organizational commitment.
8. An ef fective program includes training, super vision, monitoring, suppor t,
recognition, and evaluation to meet ser vice and learning goals.
9. An ef fective program insures that the time commitment for ser vice and
learning is flexible, appropriate, and in the best interests of all involved.
10. An ef fective program is committed to program par ticipation by and with
diverse populations.
A Service and Learning Typology
1. service learning
2. Service-LEARNING
3. SERVICE-learning
4. SERVICE-LEARNING
1. Service and learning
goals separate
2. Learning goals
primary; service
outcomes secondary
3. Service outcomes
primary; learning
goals secondary
4. Service and learning
goals of equal weight;
each enhances the
other for all
participants
High impact programs and outcomes
Program Characteristics
 Placement quality
 Application
 Reflection: writing
 Reflection: discussion
 Diversity
 Community voice
Service Learning Outcome
Personal development
Interpersonal development
Closeness to faculty
Citizenship
Learning, understanding,
applying
 Problem-solving, critical
thinking
 Stereotyping, tolerance
 Perspective transformation





Enhancing Intercultural Competence
Through Civic Engagement
1. Provide a thorough introduction to the community
2. Work to dispel myths and negative, inaccurate
stereotypes
3. Consider the multidimensionality of the social factors
and systemic issues affecting the community
4. Take into account the intragroup diversity that exists
between the community and those engaged with the
community
5. Attempt to develop trust gradually and over extended
period of time
International engagement
Institutional Organization and
Transformation
 Organizational
structures evolve based
upon mission, strategy,
and/or leadership
 Universities with
renowned servicelearning programs
utilize differing models
 Strong academic
leadership enhances
faculty involvement
 Regardless of model,
coordination of efforts
is essential
 Coordinated community
engagement beyond
student volunteer
service enhances the
role of the University in
the community
 Leveraging and building
upon existing service
and service learning
programs can create a
more strategic
relationship with local
and state governments
and civic organizations
References













Astin, A. Vogelgesang, L,.J. Ikeda, E.K. and Yee, J.A. (2000). How service learning affects students . Los
Angeles: Higher Education Research Institute, UCLA.
Delve, C.I., Mintz, S.D. and Stewart, G.M. (1990). Promoting values development through community
service: A design. In Delve, C.I., Mintz, S.D. and Stewart, G.M. (Eds.) Community service as values
education. New Directions for Student Services, 50. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Dunlap, M.E. and Webster, N. (2009). Enhancing intercultural competence through civic engagement. In .
In Jacoby, B. (Ed.), Civic engagement in higher education: Concepts and practices . San Francisco: Jossey
Bass.
Eyler, J.S. and Giles , D.E. (1999). Where’s the learning in service -learning? San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Eyler, J.S., Giles, D. E., Stenson, C.M. and Gray, C.J.( 2001). At a glance: What we know about the effects
of service learning on college students, faculty, institutions and communities, 1993 -2000: Third Edition.
Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University.
Global Health Minor (2012). Retrieved January 22, 2012, from http://roosevelt.ucsd.edu/global health/index.html.
Keen, C. and Hall, K. (2009). Engaging with difference matters: Longitudinal student outcomes of co curricular service-learning programs. The Journal of Higher Education , 80, (1), pp. 59 -79.
Kuh, G.D. (2008). High Impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why
they matter. Washington, DC: AAC&U.
Mintz, S.D. and Hesser, G.W. (1996). Principles of good practice in service -learning. In Jacoby, B. (Ed.),
Service Learning in higher education. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.
National Service-Learning Clearinghouse (2012). Washington, D.C.: Corporation for National Service.
Organizing, defining and assessing service -learning programs (2010.) Custom research brief. Washington,
D.C. Education Advisory Board Student Affairs Leadership Council.
Pizga, J.M. and Troppe, M.L. (2003). Developing an infrastructure for service -learning and engagement. In
Jacoby, B. (Ed.), Building partnerships for service Learning. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.
Sigmon, R. (1996). The problem of definition in service -learning. In R. Sigmon et al., The journey to
service-learning. Washington, D.C.: Council of Independent Colleges.
From Community Service
to Service Learning:
Unlocking the Educational
Impact of Student Service
Activities
Penny Rue, Ph.D.
Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs
University of California, San Diego
Student Expectations &
Workforce Realities:
Experiential Learning
from an Employer
Perspective
Andy Ceperley
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Experiential Learning
Director, Career Ser vices Center
University of California, San Diego
Experiential Learning and
Recent UC San Diego Graduates
Graduates’ Chosen Fields of Employment
Most Popular Strategies Used to Secure
Employment
1. Internships/previous work experience
(29%)
2. Employer websites and direct employer
contact (22%)
3. Online job boards and Port Triton (20%)
4. Networking (14%)
What Students Want in Their First Jobs
1. Opportunity for personal growth
2. Job Security
3. Employee Benefits
4. Friendly co-workers
5. High starting salary
6. Chance to improve community
7. Recognition for performance
8. Location close to home
9. Opportunity for rapid advancement
10.Diversity
Employers’ Hiring Priorities
A student’s academic major and leadership
experience are meaningful influencers on
employers’ hiring decisions
73% of employers screen by GPA
Relevant work experience represents the
highest influencer employers are seeking in
college graduates (76%)
Attribute
% of respondents
Ability to work in a team
79.8%
Leadership
77.2%
Communication skills (written)
75.6%
Problem-solving skills
74.1%
Strong work ethic
73.1%
Analytical/quantitative skills
72.0%
Communication skills (verbal)
67.4%
Initiative
65.3%
Technical skills
61.1%
Detail-oriented
57.5%
Flexibility/adaptability
56.0%
Computer skills
55.4%
Interpersonal skills (relates well to others)
54.9%
Organizational ability
50.8%
Strategic planning skill
29.0%
Friendly/outgoing personality
29.0%
Creativity
22.3%
Entrepreneurial skills/risk-taker
21.8%
Tactfulness
21.2%
Resume
Reviews:
Top
Attributes
Employers
Seek
Student Affairs Learning Outcomes
Framework
1. Intrapersonal, interpersonal, and intergroup
competencies
2. Social justice and community responsibility
3. Personal skill development
4. Effective communication
5. Intellectual growth
6. Leadership skills
References
 U C S a n D i e g o S t ude n t A f f a i r s L e a r n i n g O u t c o me s Fr a m ew o rk ( 2 01 0 )
h t t p : / / s t ud e n t s . uc s d . e d u/ s t ud e n t - l ife / _ o r g a ni z a t io n s / s t ud e n t - a f f ai r s / s t r a t - p l a n . h t ml .
 U C S a n D i e g o S u r vey o f Re c e n t G r a d u a te s ( 2 01 0 )
h t t p : / / c a r e e r.uc s d . e d u/ al um n i / a l um ni - s ur v ey / i n d ex .h t m l .
 N AC E Re s e a r c h C l a s s o f 2 01 1 S t u d e n t S u r vey Re p o r t w w w.n a c ewe b . o r g .
 N AC E Re s e a r c h J o b O u t l o o k 2 01 2 w w w. n a c ewe b .o r g .
Student Expectations &
Workforce Realities:
Experiential Learning
from an Employer
Perspective
Andy Ceperley
Assistant Vice Chancellor, Experiential Learning
Director, Career Ser vices Center
University of California, San Diego
Sixth College Practicum
Assessment
Diane A. Forbes Berthoud
Practicum Director
Daisy Rodriguez
Practicum Program Coordinator
University of California, San Diego
Sixth College Practicum
Unique to the Sixth College curriculum
Sixth College upper-division GE
requirement
Integration of theory and practice by
making connections between classroom
learning and community experiences
Sixth College Practicum
Research reveals that students greatly
benefit from experiential learning:
Essential leadership skills
Better communication skills
Increased self-awareness
Enhanced multicultural and global
understanding
Sixth College Student Enrollment
Practicum Courses 2010-2011
Programs
Abroad
0.40%
CAT 124
Other Preapproved &
Unapproved
courses
21%
MAE
171
A&B
1%
INTL
190
3%
Independent and Special
Studies
14%
MGT 121 A &
B
7%
AIP
197
8%
TIES
CAT 124
18%
EDS
TIES
6%
EDS
22%
AIP 197
Independent Studies &
Internships
MGT 121 A & B
INTL 190
MAE 171 A&B
Programs Abroad
Assessing Experiential Learning at
Sixth
Pre- and Post-Practicum Survey
Modified from a Rockquemore and Schaffer
(2000) study
Measures attitudinal changes in students, their
learning process, and how that process is unique
to experiential learning
Pre- and Post- Practicum Survey
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
I have a realistic understanding of the daily responsibilities
involved in the jobs (career) in which I am interested.
I am motivated by courses that contain hand-on applications
of theories to real-life situations.
I am uncertain of what’s required to succeed in the career that
I want to pursue.
I feel I can make a difference in the world.
There is little I can do to end discrimination on the basis of
gender, race, sexual orientation, or any other identity.
I learn the course content best when connections to real-life
situations are made.
It is important to find a career that directly benefits others.
I am an active member of my community.
It is important that I work toward equal opportunity for all
people.
I make very few assumptions about others.
I think that people should find time to contribute to their
community.
It is not necessary for me to volunteer my time.
There is no relation between my real life experiences and
what I learn in school.
I have a good understanding of the needs and concerns of the
community in which I live.
The world would be a better place if differences between
people were ignored.
I have a good understanding of the strengths and resources of
the community in which I live.
I possess the necessary personal qualities (e.g. responsibility,
consideration, initiative, etc.) to be a successful career person.
I feel I can have a positive impact on local social problems.
The things I learn in school are not applicable to my life
outside of school.
To be effective in the community, all you need is a caring
heart.
I feel uncomfortable presenting/ speaking in front of a group
of individuals in positions of authority.
Being involved in a program to improve my community is
important to me.
I do not feel well prepared to embark on my post-graduate
plans (e.g. graduate school, employment, etc.)
I have very little impact on the community in which I live.
Strongly
agree
Somewhat
agree
Strongly
disagree
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
6
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
6
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
Practicum
Pre- and
PostSurvey
Student Participation Spring 2011
CAT 124 Courses Offered





CAT
CAT
CAT
CAT
CAT
124:
124:
124:
124:
124:
Torrey Pines Elementary
Urban Discovery Academy
Coaching the Craft of Writing
Online Tutoring
Spanish Civil War Memory Project
48 students (21%) enrolled in CAT 124
courses
 Pre-Survey: 44% Response Rate
 Post-Survey: 35% Response Rate
Student Participation Summer & Fall
2011
 CAT 124 Courses Offered Summer 2011
 CAT 124: Solar Energy and Student Life
 33 students (48%) enrolled in CAT 124 course
 Pre-Survey: 55% Response Rate
 Post-Survey: 42% Response Rate
 CAT 124 Courses Offered Fall 2011
 CAT 124: Coaching the Craft of Writing
 CAT 124: Online Tutoring
 19 students (9%) enrolled in CAT 124 courses
 Pre-Survey: 58% Response Rate
 Post-Survey: 53% Response Rate
Pre- and Post-Survey Themes
 Career preparedness and success
 Attitudes towards community service and civic
responsibility
 Academic connection to life
 Attitudes towards equality of opportunity
 Connection between career and community
 Understanding of community resources
 Attitudes towards social justice
CAT 124 Spring 11 Data Impact: Career
Preparedness & Success
Understanding of
responsibilities of career
(Q1)
57%
77%
Possession of personal
qualities to be successful (Q
17)
Uncertainty of requirements
for career success (Q 3)
85%
100%
48%
24%
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
Percentage
PreSurvey
PostSurvey
CAT 124 Spring 11 Data Impact: Attitude
Change Toward Community Service &
Civic Responsibility
Need for caring heart to be
effective in the community (Q
20)
48%
24%
67%
It is not necessary for me to
volunteer my time (Q12)
Disagree
88%
I think that people should find
time to contribute to their
community (Q11)
81%
0%
20%
40% 60%
Percentage
Disagree
Pre-Survey
PostSurvey
95%
80% 100%
CAT 124 Spring 11 Data Impact:
Academic Connection to Life
81%
Relevance of course curriculum
to life (Q26)
89%
The things I learn in school are
not applicable to my life outside
of school (Q19)
71%
Disagree
83%
Disagree
Pre-Survey
86%
Course content connection to
real-life situations (Q6)
Post-Survey
94%
0%
20%
40% 60%
Percentage
80% 100%
CAT 124 Summer 11 Data Impact:
Attitude Change Towards Social Justice
Ignoring differences
makes the world a
better place (Q19)
23% Disagree
43% Disagree
Pre-Survey
Post-Survey
28% Disagree
There is little I can do
to end discrimination
(Q5)
43% Disagree
0%
20%
40%
60%
Percentage
80%
100%
CAT 124 Fall 11 Data Impact: Attitude
Change Towards Social Justice
I make very few
assumptions about others
(Q10)
54%
80%
I feel I can have a positive
impact on local social
problems (Q18)
45%
60%
Pre45% Disagree
Survey
70% DisagreePostSurvey
There is little I can do to end
discrimination (Q5)
72%
80%
I feel I can make a
difference in the world (Q4)
0%
20%
40% 60%
Percentage
80%
100%
CAT 124 Fall 11 Data Impact: Attitude
Change Toward Community Service & Civic
Responsibility
27% Disagree
50% Disagree
I have very little impact on the
community in which I live(Q24)
Being involved in a program to
improve my community is
important to me (Q22)
54%
80%
54% Disagree
90% Disagree
It is not necessary for me to
volunteer my time (Q12)
I think that people should find
time to contribute to their
community (Q11)
73%
90%
45%
I am an active member of my
community (Q8)
70%
0%
50%
Percentage
100%
PreSurvey
Areas for Exploration:
Communicating with Authority
I feel uncomfortable presenting/speaking in front of a group of
individuals in positions of authority (Q21)
9%
Fall 11
30%
50%
Summer 11
71%
29%
41%
Spring 11
0%
20%
40% 60%
Percentage
80% 100%
Pre-Survey
Post-Survey
Areas for Exploration:
Community Resources
I have a good understanding of the strengths and resources of the
community in which I live (Q16)
64%
Fall 11
70%
PreSurvey
43%
Spring 11
41%
0%
20%
40%
60%
Percentage
80%
100%
Next Steps
 Analyze data for differences in response based on
ethnicity/race
 Expand survey to non-CAT Practicum Courses
 Education Studies courses (22%)
 Independent Studies (14%)
 Academic Internship Program (8%)
 Continue assessment for a full academic year and
work toward publication
Sixth College Practicum
Assessment
Diane A. Forbes Berthoud
Practicum Director
Daisy Rodriguez
Practicum Program Coordinator
University of California, San Diego
Academic Integrity:
Making Meaning from
the Experience of
Cheating
Patricia Mahaffey, Ed.D.
Dean of Student Affairs, Muir College
University of California, San Diego
Prevalence of Academic Cheating
 Studies have cited statistics as high as 2/3rds of college
students and 74% of high schools students reporting having
engaged in academic cheating (Angell, 2006; Callahan, 2004;
Hughes & McCabe, 2006; McCabe, 2007; Whitley, 2998).
 The problem starts as early as middle school and continues
into high school with roughly 1/3 of students indicating they
would be willing to cheat if it increased their chance of
attending college (Finn & Frone, 2006; Levy & Rakovski,
2006).
 Roughly 44% of faculty fail to report cases of academic
misconduct (McCabe, 2009)
What Influences
Cheating?
Individual factors:
Age, gender, course major,
academic achievement, cocurricular experience,
culture & religion, moral
development, previous
engagement in cheating.
Individual Perceptions:
Likelihood of getting
caught, cost/benefit
analysis, severity of
penalties, perceptions of
peer behavior.
Contextual Variables:
Honor Code Environments
Classroom Environments
Organizational Values
Propensity
to engage
in
academic
dishonesty
Perceptions
How do students perceive academic dishonesty individually and among their
peers?
The classes are large
and impersonal; no
relationship with their
professors
6%
Professors give lame
assignments, the same
exams and assignments.
0%
Professors don't care
nor emphasize
academic integrity .
1%
None of the above;
students don't cheat at
UCSD
0%
Students don't know
they're behavior will be
considered cheating
10%
Students think they
won't get caught.
19%
Pressure to succeed;
students are willing to
take the risk to get a
higher grade.
64%
Fall and Winter, 2009 Surveys Combined
Survey Question: “I think for the most part, that UCSD students cheat in their classes because…”
UC San Diego Academic Integrity Office Data
Why is paying attention to student
development important?
 A student developmental approach is largely under utilized on
many college campuses in addressing violations of academic
integrity. Money (2008) Kibler (1993)
 Institutions have an inherent responsibility to proactively
assist in a student’s positive developmental growth as a
holistic individual.
 National organizations like the Templeton Foundation and the
Association of American Colleges and Universities, are calling
upon institutions to more intentionally address the moral
development of students. Swaner, (2004), Callahan (2010).
 Students enter college during a period of profound personal
transition. As important as it is to prepare students
intellectually, equally impor tant is to prepare students to
become personally and socially responsible leaders.
Broad Responses to a Cheating
Incident:
Marginalization
Profound Reflection
Characterized by…
Characterized by…
 Resistance, denial and/or
minimizing
 Minimal or no altered
thinking or changes in
behavioral choices
 Externalization of
emotional responses such
as anger, feelings of
betrayal, fear
 Acceptance for the
dishonesty
 Altered thinking and
behavior choices
 Internalization of emotional
responses such as regret,
shame, fear,
disappointment
What factors facilitate a student’s
marginalization of the experience?
 Externalized Emotional Responses
 Lack of Disclosure
 Resistance
 Rationalization
What facilitates student’s growth
from the experience?
 Resilience
 Altered thinking and behavior
 Honest Disclosure
 Internalized Emotional Responses
 Reflection
Final Thoughts:
 Overall, students who resist responsibility and engage in
marginalizing the experience through neutralizing
attitudes/behaviors derive less meaning from the cheating
experience.
 Positive Impression Management (Weiner, 1995). The character
vs. incident argument.
 Moral growth and understanding occurs through immoral
experiences. If we provide….
 Opportunities for self reflection
 Safe disclosure
 Connect the incident to broader life experience (e.g. it’s not just an
academic thing)
 Overall, students who genuinely accept responsibility and engage
in honest reflection seem to experience more profound learning.
 These students derive more meaning from the cheating incident.
 Moral growth and understanding occurs through immoral
experiences. IF….
 Opportunities for self reflection
 Safe disclosure
 Connecting to broader life experience (e.g. it’s not just an
academic thing)
Weiner’s Attribution Theory
•Personal/impersonal
responsibility
•Positive impression
management
Kolb’s Experiential Learning
Theory
Van Vliet Shame &
Resilience Theory
•Life experience
•Reflection
•Connecting, refocusing,
accepting, & resisting negative
emotions
Academic Integrity:
Making Meaning from
the Experience of
Cheating
Patricia Mahaffey, Ed.D.
Dean of Student Affairs, Muir College
University of California, San Diego

similar documents