WHAT ARE THINKING MAPS?

Report
WELCOME!
Common Core
&
Thinking Maps
Presenter: Vidal Valdez
RIGOROUS COLLEGE AND
CAREER READINESS
STANDARDS
TODAY’S AGENDA
What are
thinking
maps?
21ST CENTURY
SKILLS
Defining
characteristics
of Thinking
Maps?
Teach each
map
(1 min limit)
Learn the Frame
of Reference
(Essential
Questions)
Activity: TM’s
and Common
Core standards
What is a rigorous map?
Questions
Developing a beginning understanding of
all 8 Thinking Maps.
How do I use Thinking maps
with Common Core Standards?
To grasp the meaning of a thing, an event,
or a situation is to see it in its relations to other
things: to see how it operates or functions, what
consequences follow from it, what causes it, what
uses it can be put to.
In contrast, what we have called the brute
thing, the thing without meaning to us, is
something whose relations are not grasped. . . .
The relation of means-consequence is the center
and heart of all understanding
- John Dewey (pp. 137, 146)
4
WHAT ARE THINKING MAPS? (2 MINS)
THINKING
MAPS
Visual
Patterns
Used in
combination for
depth and
Thinking
complexity
®
Maps
Used by all
teachers
Based on
8 Cognitive
Skills
Applied in all
content areas
What are
Thinking
Maps?
How do Thinking Maps
fit into a unit of study?
• Thinking Maps are tools
• Instructional Visual Tools
– Thinking Maps provide a common visual language in our
learning community for transferring thinking processes,
integrating learning and for continuously assessing progress.
•
•
•
•
Thinking Maps & Common Core
Rigor ( Maps in Combination)
Frame of Reference & Essential Questions
Metacognition
Common Core: Unit of Study
Enduring
Understanding
“BIG IDEA”
Conceptual
Understanding
A mental
construct or
category
represented word
or phrase..
Overarching
understanding are
derived from
Concepts
Standards
“Compare &
Contrast”
Essential
Questions
Performance
Task
Plan
Learning
Experiences
Instruction
Thinking
Maps
Assessments
Reading,
Writing,
Listening
and Oral
Learning
Experiences
DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE - DOK
INSTRUCTIONAL SHIFTS
LEVELS
MORE…
MATH
QUESTIONING
ELA (VOCABULARY)
Technology
RIGOR
COLLEGE AND CAREER
READINESS
TECHNOLOGY
SMARTER BALANCE
ELD STANDARDS
ACADEMIC VOCABULARY
What are Thinking Maps?
•Developed in 1988 by Dr. David Hyerle
•8 Maps that are used by teachers and students for reading comprehension, writing process,
problem solving and thinking skills
•Each map is based on a cognitive skill such as comparing and
contrasting, sequencing, classifying, and cause-effect reasoning
•Can be utilized individually or in various combinations to form a
common visual language for students and teachers at all grade levels, in
all subjects
•Used to improve the basics of reading, writing, and mathematics as well as for problem
solving and the development of higher order thinking skills
•Used across the United States as well as Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New
Zealand, Brazil, Egypt, Ethiopia and other countries
•Supported by several published articles and brain research
Flexibility and
form is in my
opinion the
biggest
difference.
(Worksheet
format
Vs.
Blank page.
What is the Difference?
David Hyerle and Chris Yeager’s
Thinking Maps
Hyerle and Yeager identify eight fundamental thinking skills. Each of
eight maps is connected to a specific thought process.
Circle Map
Thinking Process: Defining in Context
Key Question: How are you defining this thing or idea?
Key Words and Phrases: List, define, tell everything you know, brainstorm,
identify, relate prior knowledge, describe, explore the meaning
Design: the topic is in the middle, smaller circle. Everything you know about the
topic is in the larger circle. A box, that may be included, around the entire map is a
“Frame of Reference” that is used to answer the question “How did I learn this?”
(The frame of reference can be used around any of the maps).
Common Uses: Brainstorm for writing, used as a starting point during the
prewriting stage, defining words, identifying audience and author’s point of view
Writing Mode: Point of View Essay
The Circle Map
Defining in Context
Your Turn!
TEACHING THE CIRCLE MAP
Things/people that have influenced you
Things that tell
something about you
Your
Name
Bubble Map
Thinking Process: Describing Qualities; Characterization
Key Question: How are you describing this thing? What adjectives best
describe it?
Key Words and Phrases: Describe, use vivid language, describe feelings,
observe using the five senses
Design: The topic being described is in the center bubble. The outer bubbles
contain adjectives and adjective phrases describing the topic.
Common Uses: Describing things, identifying qualities, character traits,
attributes and/or properties of things. The Bubble Map is a tool for enriching
students’ abilities to identify qualities and use descriptive words.
Writing Mode: Descriptive Writing
The Bubble Map
Describing
Describe Fractions
What are fractions?
Double Bubble
Thinking Process: Comparing and Contrasting
Key Question: What are the similar and different qualities of these things?
Key Words and Phrases: Compare/contrast, discuss similarities and
differences, prioritize essential characteristics, distinguish between,
differentiate
Design: In the center circles are the words for the two things being compared
and contrasted. In the middle bubbles, use terms to show similarities. In the
outside bubbles, describe the differences. If there are too many similarities or
differences, students should prioritize and keep only the most important.
Common Uses: A tool for comparing and contrasting two things.
Writing Mode: Comparison Essay
The Double Bubble Map
Comparing and Contrasting
Your Turn!
COMPARE AND CONTRAST
( A square and a Trapezoid )
Essential Question: _______________?
Difference
Difference
Similarity
Square
Trapezoid
Difference
Similarity
Difference
Similarity
Difference
Difference
Double Bubble
(4.8) C – Use essential attributes to define two- and three-dimensional geometric
figures.
Tree Map
Thinking Process: Classifying
Key Question: What are the main ideas, supporting ideas, and details in
information?
Key Words and Phrases: Classify, sort, group, categorize, give sufficient
and related details
Design: The category name is on the top line, subcategories on the second
level, details under each subcategory
Writing Mode: Persuasive Essay
The Tree Map
Classifying
Tree Map
Categorize
Wildfires are
frightening.
(662)
Plants and
animals have
adjusted to
wildfires.
Humans have
little control
over nature’s
power.
Wildfires are
good for bugs
and animals.
(672)
(664)
(670)
Living trees
burn as fast as
cardboard.
Many trees
need cycles of
fire to grow.
Firefighters’
efforts seemed
hopeless.
Fire beetles
lay eggs on
charred logs.
Flames can
move faster
than a running
person.
Other trees
grow back
quickly.
Fire burned for
several weeks
and destroyed
800,000 acres.
Hawks and
owls hunt in
the open
spaces.
Wildfires can
destroy homes
and kill people.
Most animals
escape from
fires.
Plants that
grow quickly
give animals
food.
Only rain,
snow, and
winds could
stop the
destruction of
that fire.
Dead trees
make good
nesting sites.
New grasses
and flowers
attract
animals.
Wildfires
don’t hurt
every animal
and actually
help some.
(674)
The natural
cycle of fire
will likely
never go
away.
(676)
Fires can be
used to
prevent
future fires.
Nests are not
usually
threatened
because fires
don’t start in
the wet
season.
Tall tree block
the sunlight to
smaller
bushes, slowly
killing them.
If fires are put
out quickly,
more trees and
plants are left
behind,
causing the
next fire
maybe to get
out of control.
Mature birds
fly away.
Small animals
run away or
hide.
Scavengers
feed on the
animals that
are killed.
When the new
pine trees
begin to block
the sunlight,
the forest will
become mostly
trees.
Then the fires
are likely to
return.
(678)
Without
regular fires in
the
Everglades,
the grass
would rot and
fill up the
swamps.
Your Turn!
Essential
Question:_____________?
Acute Angle
Standard:
ANGLES
Obtuse Angle
Right Angle
Essential
Question:_____________?
Standard:
ANGLES
Acute Angle
Obtuse Angle
Measures less
than 90 degrees
Measures more
than 90 degrees
Fits inside a right
angle
Fits between a right
angle and a straight line
Right Angle
Measures exactly 90
degrees
Forms square
corners
Brace Map
Thinking Process: Part to whole relationship
Key Question: What are the parts and subparts of this whole physical
object?
Key Words and Phrases: Part of, take apart, show structure
Design: On the line to the left, the name of the whole object is
written. On the lines within the first brace, list the major parts. The
subparts are listed in the next set of braces.
Common Uses: Used to analyze physical objects. Can be used with
anatomy, boundaries in geography, parts of tangible objects. It is for
parts only, for “types” of things, a Tree Map should be used.
Writing Mode: Technical Writing
The Brace Map
Whole to Parts
Flow Map
Thinking Process: Sequencing
Key Question: What happened? What is the sequence of events? What are the substages?
Key Words and Phrases: Sequence, put in order, order, recount, retell, what
happens next, cycles, patterns, describe processes, describe change, solve multistep problems
Design: Each stage of the event is in the larger rectangles. The sub-stages are in
smaller rectangles below the larger ones. Not all Flow Maps will have sub-stages.
Common Uses: Can be used to plot a story, show historical events in sequence,
sequence paragraphs for writing, steps in problem solving in math, identifying
stage of a life
Writing Mode: Narrative Writing
The Flow Map
Sequencing
NOTE MAKING GUIDE
SEQUENCING
Page 59
Multi Flow Map
Thinking Process: Cause and Effect; Problem-Solution
Key Question: What are the causes and effects of this event? What might happen
next?
Key Words and Phrases: Causes and effects, discuss consequences, what would
happen if, predict, describe change, identify motives, discuss strategies
Design: The event is in the center rectangle. On the left side, causes of the event.
On the right side, effects of the event.
Common Uses: Used to show and analyze cause and effect relationships. It can
also be used with only part of the map showing, such as predicting outcomes.
Writing Mode: Prediction; Cause and Effect Essay
The Multi-Flow Map
Cause and Effect
Your Turn!
Causes
What are the
How causes effects of healty
heatlhy teeth?
teeth?
Healthy
Teeth
Effects
Bridge map
Thinking Process: Seeing Analogies
Key Question: What is the analogy being used?
Key Words and Phrases: Identify the relationship, guess the rule, interpret symbols
Design: On the far left line, write the relating factor. On the top and bottom of the
bridge, write in the first pair of things that have this relationship. On the right side
of the bridge, write the second pair with the same relationship. The line of the
bridge represents the relating factor between the pair of things.
Common Uses: Identifies similarities between relationships. The relating factor
answers “How are they related?” The Bridge Map should be able to be read as a
complete sentence.
Writing Mode: Reasoning by Analogy
The Bridge Map
Seeing Analogies
People do their work in lots of places.
Frame of Reference ( Essential Questions)
What is the Frame of Reference?
The Frame of Reference can be used with any of the eight maps. It provides an area
for students to synthesize information, think more deeply (DOK), and support their
reasoning.
What goes into the Frame of Reference?
•How do you know what you know?
•Elaborate with Extras (E’s) ~or~ Interpret the Information (I’s)
DON’T LET THE
FRAME OF REFERENCE
SCARE YOU!
WHEN DO YOU ADD A FRAME OF
REFERENCE?
THE USE OF COLOR IN THE FRAME OF REFERENCE
the beginning
of ideas, of
connections.
How we know
something
usually
“springs” from
our prior
knowledge,
experience or a
specific source.
a depth of
thought.
a signal to stop
and reflect.
Analyzing what
influences our
thinking
requires
thinking “below
the surface.”
Summarizing
our thinking
and the use of
that knowledge
in the “real
world” requires
reflective
thinking.
The Frame of Reference
•How do you know what you know about this topic?
•Did your information come from a specific source?
•Is this information being influenced
by a specific point of view?
•So what do you now understand about the
information in your map ?
•Why is this information important?
EXAMPLES 
The Circle Map
What are some
of the key
characteristics
of food?
Food
provides
energy
Defining in
Context
I’m trying
to eat
more
healthy
What my
family
eats
The Bubble Map
What
adjectives
would you
use to
describe
oranges?
Describing
We have an
orange tree in
our back
yard.
I tasted
them.
The Double Bubble Map
What are the
similarities
and
differences
between
apples and
oranges?
Compare
and
Contrast
Apples and
oranges are both
nutritious colorful
fruits.
The Tree
Map
What are
some of the
key details
about
nutritional
guidelines for
the food
pyramid?
Classifying
www.foodpyramid.com
U.S. Department of
Health
The Brace Map
What are the
component
parts of an
apple?
Whole to
Parts
We cut an
apple into
its parts.
Every part of
an apple has
a specific
function.
The Flow Map
What steps would you follow to make a salad?
These are the steps my mom
always follows when she
makes a salad.
Sequencing
The Multi-Flow Map
What are the causes and effects of creating a
healthy meal?
Point of View of a
Nutritionist
Cause and Effect
The Bridge Map
What is the relationship between foods and
their nutritional value?
Knowing the nutritional value of the
foods you eat is important to a
balanced and healthy diet.
Seeing Analogies
Why is this important?
Frame of Reference
Elaborating with the Extras (The E’s)
Interpreting Information (The I’s)
Include your own personal experiences.
What is the importance of this information?
Use supporting examples from the text.
What inferences can be made?
Incorporate evidence from text/world.
What influences affect this information?
What historical/literary events support your
ideas?
Include further explanation on the subject.
Elaborate on your thinking and reasoning.
What expert “opinions” can you find as support?
Include excitement or personal feelings about
the topic.
What is a rigorous
Map?
Maps in
Combination
A map is
Rigorous
Correct Linguistic
Patterns based on
Thought processes
Always Add :
So
What or So Why?
Essential questions!
Academic
Vocabulary : Tier 1,2,3
• Evidence from the Text
• Framed based upon a
specific point of views
Overview
Common Core/State
Standards
Thinking Process
Determine the meaning of
domain-specific and general
academic vocabulary.
Brainstorming or
Defining in Context
Circle
Map
Use relevant descriptive
details and sensory language
in reading and writing.
Describing
Bubble
Map
Compare and contrast
important points in two texts or
points of view; draw informal
comparative inferences about
two populations.
Determine main idea of text,
recount the key supporting
details in complex texts.
Comparing and
Contrasting
Classifying
Thinking Maps as
Tools
Double
Bubble
Map
Tree
Map
Overview
Common Core /State
Standards
Thinking Process
Thinking Maps as
Tools
Decode words with common
affixes; find all factor pairs for
a whole number.
Whole-Part
Brace
Map
Understand solving an equation
or inequality as a process of
answering questions.
Sequencing
Flow
Map
Evaluate the argument and specific
claims in a text; determine the
Cause and
impact of author’s purpose and
Effect
point of view have on a text.
Analyze the relationship between a
Seeing
primary and secondary sources;
analyze patterns and relationships. Relationships
Multi-Flow
Map
Bridge
Map
Page 1
You have
been
introduced to
Thinking
Maps®
You can name the 5 key
points defining Thinking
Maps®
You can explain the
similarities and differences
between Graphic Organizers
and Thinking Maps®
You can identify the thought
process behind each
Thinking Map and the Frame
of Reference
You can draw and define
each map
You have a beginning
understanding of how to use
the maps in a variety of
curriculum areas
SCAFFOLDING
SECURITY AND
ACCESS
“What is important is to allow
all students to interact with
challenging text on their own
as frequently and
independently as possible.”
Common Core Standards
Appendix A
Better learning will come not so
much from finding better ways for
the teacher to
INSTRUCT but from giving the
learner better ways to
CONSTRUCT MEANING.
The maps should become
STUDENT TOOLS FOR
INDEPENDENT THINKING AND COLLABORATION.
Developing Conceptual Understanding
Creating a Lesson Activity
1. Read “Red Alert”
(information text)
2. Choose 1 out of the
Thinking Maps to create a
Group Activity using the
article “Red Alert”
- reading, writing, academic
vocabulary ,ect…
1. Add the Frame of
Reference: A question.
2. Add colors
3. Share out….
The secret of success in teaching
is pace… Get your knowledge
quickly and then use it. If you
can use it you will retain it.
- John Dewey
86
Thank you !
Presenter info:
[email protected]
Website of all items:
Link here Andrew

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