ACCESS for ELLs

Report
Steve West
Title III/ESL Coordinating Teacher, 9-12
"Nearly every problem an English language
learner (ELL) faces is magnified by
limitations to the student’s ability to
consume and produce high-quality English.
Every hurdle is a little higher; every finish
line is a little farther away. ESL places
additional demands on time, resources, and
personnel, and involvement from families is
often more difficult to obtain.“
Brian Crosson, ESL Teacher
Manassas Park (VA) High School
10 Things Every School Leader Should Know About ESL

Throughout the presentation today, we will
begin the discussions about how to:
 Ask critical questions about the ESL program in
your building;
 Implement effective structures and strategies to
support academic achievement of English
Language Learners (ELLs);
 Utilize resources for ELLs and their teachers.

Focus of the ESL classroom:
 To help LEP students obtain English proficiency in
order to participate fully and successfully in all
academic areas.
Critical Question:
Critical Question:
Critical Question:

ACCESS for ELLs is a large-scale language proficiency
test for K–12 students.

Developed in partnership with the Center for Applied
Linguistics.

A comprehensive, standards-driven system designed to
improve the teaching and learning of English
language learners (ELLs).

First implemented in 3 states in 2005; Administered to
approximately 1,000,000 students in 31 states during
2012-2013.

To monitor student progress in English
language development on a yearly basis.

To serve as one criterion in determining when
ELLs have attained language proficiency
comparable to that of their English-proficient
peers.
Listening Speaking Reading Writing
ACCESS results are returned to the LEP Contact in late
May/early June…Ask your LEP Contact for a score report for
your school.
Composite
Critical Question:


Includes all LEP students with at least two
data points (two years of test results).
Progress is met by:
 1) increase to next overall English Language
Proficiency level,
 2) increase the previous overall score by .5, or
 3) meet exit criteria.
 Progress is also measured by earning credits

Reading Score: Minimum of 4.0
+

Writing Score: Minimum of 4.0
+

Composite Score: Minimum of 4.8
=
EXIT LEP STATUS
Reading Writing
Did this student exit LEP status?
Composite

As with all assessments, ACCESS for ELLs
scores should be considered one of multiple
criteria used in educational decision making.
Critical Question:
LIEP Services Provided for ALL LEP Students







ESL teachers are expected to infuse content language from C-MAPP (our local electronic curriculum warehouse that includes CCSS standards) into their daily lessons.
These lessons incorporate the domains of language from our Essential Standards, the WIDA standards.
Some ESL teachers serve more than one school. ESL teachers at our low incidence schools may be at that school only 1 or 2 days per week.
ESL teachers work closely with other teachers who provide LIEP services and collaborate on a regular basis to monitor progress and ensure that these students succeed.
Placement decisions can be modified during the year as determined by the ESL teacher and the LEP Team. LEP students should be strategically placed and/or scheduled
to allow consistent and appropriate LIEP services.
Many classroom teachers have been trained in SIOP and/or best practices for LEP students.
Intervention support (Tier II Interventionists – Not ESL) may be provided to students in any category of service.
ESL support will be provided to students identified as both EC and LEP as determined by the IEP and LEP Teams.
Placement decisions can be modified during the year as determined by the ESL teacher
and the LEP Team. LEP students should be strategically placed and/or scheduled to
allow consistent and appropriate LIEP services.
ESL support will be provided to students identified as both EC and LEP as determined
by the IEP and LEP Teams.
Critical Question:
Critical Question :

Student Achievement
through Sheltered
Instruction
Now that you know about the ESL program…

What information does your school use to
determine an ELL’s level of service?

What do you think your ESL teacher’s
perception is of how well the LIEP Continuum
is being implemented at your school?

Are ELLs engaged in and producing academic
language in all classes?

How do you schedule ELLs?
 Who is involved in the scheduling process?
 How do you choose which courses are appropriate
for them?


Includes all LEP students with at least two
data points (two years of test results).
Progress is met by:
 1) increase to next overall English Language
Proficiency level,
 2) increase the previous overall score by .5, or
 3) meet exit criteria.
 Progress is also measured by earning credits
State Goal: 57.1%
WCPSS: 59.13%
AMAO 1 Progress:
Includes all LEP students with at least two data points (two years of test results). Progress is met by
1) increase to next overall ELP level, 2) increase the previous overall score by .5, or 3) meet exit
criteria.
Newcomers
Print, Translation and Websites
ESL Teacher
Title III/ESL Central Services Staff
www.wida.us
Discovery Education
10 Things Every School Leader Should Know
About ESL
 iPads – 8 Schools




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 Set of 10 used for English language development

Rosetta Stone – 8 Pilot Schools
 English language development
 Native language literacy

Dave’s ESL Café: One of the most popular sites for teachers of ELLs.
 www.eslcafe.com

ColorinColorado: A bilingual site for families and educators of English
language learners.
 http://www.colorincolorado.org/

Wordsift: WordSift helps anyone easily sift through text and quickly
identify important words that appear in the text.
 http://www.wordsift.com/

Bogglesworld: Activities and materials for teaching ELLs.
 www.bogglesworld.com

Discovery School Puzzlemaker: Easy to use tools for making crossword
puzzles, word searches and other word games.
 www.puzzlemaker.com

El Pueblo: Non-profit advocacy group committed to
strengthening the Latino community in North Carolina.
 www.elpueblo.org

A Guide to Learning English: Information for mainstream
teachers of ESL students.
 www.everythingesl.net

Learn NC: On-line teaching and learning tools for
educators including bilingual and ESL resources.
 www.learnnc.org

Collaboration and Co-Teaching: Strategies for English
Learners
 Andrea Honigsfeld and Maria G. Dove
 Corwin (2010)

The More-Than-Just-Surviving Handbook: ESL for
Every Classroom Teacher
 Barbara Law and Mary Eckes
 Portage and Main Press (2000)

99 Ideas and Activities for Teaching English Language
Learners with The SIOP Model
 Mary Ellen Vogt
 Jana Echevarria

Fifty Strategies for Teaching English Language
Learners – Second Edition
 Adrienne Herrrell and Michael Jordan
 Pearson Education, Inc. (2004)

The Handbook for Educators Who Work with Children
of Mexican Origin – Third Edition
 UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education
Research Triangle Schools Partnership
School of Education
University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
CB #3500
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3500
(919) 966-8000

A Bilingual Dictionary of School Terminology
 Barbara Thuro
 Ammie Enterprises (2000)

School Letters in English and Spanish
 Ammie Enterprises (2000)

Hola! Communicating with Spanish-Speaking Parents
 Joni Britt
 Good Apple: A Division of Frank Shaffer Publications, Inc.
(1997)
Steve West
 Title III/ESL Coordinating Teacher, 9-12
 [email protected]
 (919) 431-7483

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