CICO with Individualized Features

Report
High School Counselors Meeting
March 19, 2014
Kristen McElligatt, RtI Facilitator
• Welcome
• Thank You for your feedback!
• Be respectful
• Cell phones off/vibrate
• Leave no trace
• Be responsible
• Use a CR-PBIS lens
• Participate!
• Feedback & input
• 10 Critical Features of Tier 2 Interventions
• PBIS Tier 2 Interventions
• CICO
• SAIG
• 3 types of groups
• GWIF
• Mentoring
• Brief FBA/BIP
• Data collection and documentation
1. Intervention linked directly to school wide
expectations and/or academic goals.
2. Intervention continuously available for student
participation.
3. Intervention is implemented within 3 school
days of determining the student is in need of
the intervention
4. Intervention can be modified based on
assessment and/or outcome data
5. Intervention includes structured prompts for
what to do in relevant situations.
6. Intervention results in students receiving
positive and/or corrective feedback from
staff.
7. Intervention includes a school-home
communication exchange system at least
weekly.
Orientation process and introduction to materials
is provided for students as they begin the
intervention
8.
9. Orientation to and materials provided for
staff/sub’s/volunteers who have students using the
intervention. Ongoing information shared with staff.
10. Opportunities to practice new skills are
provided daily.
 Are your PBIS Tier 2 interventions aligned to the
critical features? How do you know?
 Are your PBIS systems culturally responsive? How do
you know?
 Are your PBIS Tier 2 group interventions effective?
How do you know?
 How are you documenting the integrity/fidelity of
the interventions?
 What data needs to be shared with all staff? How
often? Why?
What does that acronym mean?????
CICO – Check-In/Check-Out
SAIG – Social/Academic Instructional Groups
GWIF – Groups with Individual Features
FBA – Functional Behavior Assessment
BIP – Behavior Intervention Plan
CICO
Book:
Responding to Problem Behavior in Schools:
The Behavior Education Program
(Crone, Horner, & Hawken, 2010)
DVD:
The Behavior Education Program: A Check-In, CheckOut Intervention for Students At-Risk
(Hawken, Pettersson, Mootz, & Anderson, 2005)
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First level of Tier 2 intervention
Extension of Tier 1
Same for all identified students
Large group intervention
Support for 7-12% of the school population
High frequency positive or neutral feedback
Low impact on staff time
CICO Cycle
Students are
identified based
on data rules.
Every 2 weeks
Coordinator reviews individual
student DPR data
@ 4 weeks
Coordinator determines level
of success
Morning
Check-In
Responding = Continue
Home
Check-In
DPR &
Other
Data
Daily
Teacher
Evaluation
Not Responding = Reverse
Request for Assistance
Monthly
Systems Team Meeting
 Coordinator reports data
Afternoon
CheckOut
Adapted from Crone, Horner, Hawkin (2004)
 Team completes tracking
tool
 Team makes data-based
decisions
1. Check-in with assigned adult upon arrival to school
• Greets student
• Collects previous day’s DPR with parent
signature (optional)
• Reviews School-wide expectations
• Provides new Daily Progress Report
• Provides materials (pencil etc.) if needed
• Provides reinforcer for check-in (optional)
(March & Horner, 1998)
2. During each time period:
• Teacher provides positive/corrective
behavioral feedback
• Teacher completes DPR or student completes
self-monitoring DPR (teacher checks and initials
card)
(March & Horner, 1998)
CICO Daily Cycle continued…
3. Check-out at end of day:
• Review points & goals
• Reinforce student for checking-out
• Receive reinforcer if goal met (optional)
• Take DPR card home (optional)
(March & Horner, 1998)
4. Student gives DPR to parent (optional)
• Student receives reinforcer from parent
• Parent signs card (Students are not “punished” if their parents
don’t participate.)
5. Return signed card next day – celebrate
(March & Horner, 1998)
Social/
Academic
Instructional Groups
(SAIG)
Three types of skills-building groups:
1) Pro-social skills
2) Problem-solving skills
3) Academic Behavior skills
Skill groups can be facilitated by:
 Social Workers
 Counselors
 Psychologists
 Teachers
 Other staff
1. Build SAIG on top of a strong Tier 1
System
2. Develop a group goal/plan using the
Tier 2 Documentation Worksheet &
Intervention Integrity Form
3. Collect and use data to problem solve
• Choose & modify lessons from pre-packaged material
based on the skill needed for the group
and/or
• Use already created universal behavior lesson plans
or create lesson plans (Cool Tools) to directly teach
replacement behaviors
• Strong Teens (Grades 9-12)
• Aggression Replacement Training
• Skillstreaming for the Adolescent
• Tough Kids Social Skills (Grades 3-7)
• Other
• Listening
• Asking for Help
• Saying Thank You
• Bringing Materials to
Class
• Contributing to
Discussions
• Offering Help to an
Adult
• Asking a Question
• Following Instructions
• Ignoring Distractions
• Completing Assignments
• Making Corrections
• Deciding on Something
to Do
Skills from Skillstreaming
• Setting a Goal
From Skill Streaming
• Introducing Yourself
• Beginning a
Conversation
• Ending a Conversation
• Joining In
• Playing a Game
•Asking a Favor
•Offering Help to a
Classmate
•Giving a Compliment
•Accepting a
Compliment
•Suggesting an Activity
•Sharing
•Apologizing
• Knowing Your Feelings
• Dealing with Fear
• Expressing Your Feelings
• Rewarding Yourself
• Recognizing Another's
Feelings
• Using Self-Control
• Showing Understanding of
Another's Feelings
• Responding to Teasing
• Expressing Concern for
Another
• Staying Out of Fights
• Dealing with Your Anger
• Dealing with Another's Anger
• Expressing Affection
•
Skills from Skillstreaming
• Asking Permission
• Avoiding Trouble
• Problem Solving
• Accepting Consequences
• Dealing with an Accusation
What type(s) of groups are available?
How are students identified for a group?
What skills are taught?
What curriculum, resources/materials are
used?
What data is collected to determine group
effectiveness? How is it documented?
What data is collected to determine student
response? How is it documented?
o CICO with individualized features
o Mentoring
CICO with
Individualized
Features
• Adds support to general CICO
• Used after general CICO has been tried for
predetermined amount of time (i.e. 4-6 weeks)
and student has not met pre-determined goal
set for ALL students
• Teachers choose more individualized options on
the Reverse Request for Assistance form
• Tier 2 team designs the options for the school
and communicates them to all staff
• The Reverse Request for Assistance form lists the
specified options from which to choose
• Uses the same DPR as used in general
CICO
• Designed to be quick and efficient
• Extra check in time before/after lunch with
facilitator or other staff member
• Peer accompanies student to check in at
beginning of the day and check out at end of
the day
• Check in with supportive adult prior to a
difficult class period
Mentoring
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Traditional one-to-one mentoring
Group mentoring
Team mentoring
Peer mentoring
E-mentoring
• Most common form of mentoring
• Matches need to happen early in the
school-year
• One year commitment is the norm
• Frequent contact between mentors &
mentees
School-based Mentoring
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64% of students developed more positive attitudes towards school
60% improved relationships with adults
56% improved relationships with peers
55% were better able to express their feelings
64% developed higher levels of self-confidence
62% were more likely to trust their teachers
Less likely than peers to repeat a grade
Average number of unexcused absences dropped
Source: Curtis, T., & Hansen-Schwoebel, K. (1999).
Big Brothers Big Sisters School-based Mentoring: Evaluation Summary of Five
Pilot Programs Philadelphia: Big Brothers Big Sisters of America.
• www.mentoring.org
• www.bbbs.org (Big Brothers, Big Sisters)
• School-based mentoring study
• http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12002242
• meta-analysis of mentoring research
• http://www.ihrp.uic.edu/researcher/david-dubois-phd
• Research & resources from University of Illinois Chicago, David L. Dubois,
Ph.D.
• http://whatworks.uwex.edu/Pages/1factsheet.html
Brief to Complex FBA/BIP: Continuum
Brief
Complex
For:
Students with mild to moderate
problem behaviors (behaviors
that are NOT dangerous or
occurring in many settings)
Students with moderate to severe
behavioral problems; may be dangerous
and/or occurring in many settings
What:
Relatively Simple and Efficient
process for behavior support
planning based on “practical”
FBA data
Time-intensive process that may involve
emergency planning, family-centered
planning, and collaboration with outside
agencies
Developed
by whom:
Team of school-based
professionals (e.g., Problemsolving team members whose
responsibilities include FBA and
behavior intervention planning)
Individualized team including the family
& professionals trained to develop and
implement intensive interventions for
students with severe problem behaviors
(e.g., behavior specialist)
42
• How do you identify students for
intervention?
• How do you match students to
intervention?
• What data decisions are used for IN,
ON, OUT?
• What documentation is necessary?
www.measuredeffects.com
• Group Effectiveness
• Individual Response
If Intervention is Effective
Continue
If Intervention is
Ineffective
Problem Solve
& Modify
Intervention Effectiveness
70% or
better
If Intervention is Effective:
If Intervention is Ineffective:
Continue
Modify
Fade (Self Monitoring)
Intensify
Discontinue/Graduate
Recycle through Problem
Solving Process
PBIS
• How is your team/school addressing cultural
responsiveness?
• How have you addressed CR in:
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Analyzing proportionality
Teaching expectations (Behavioral Lessons/Cool Tools)
Acknowledging student behavior
Collecting data of majors and minors
Building Relationships with students and each other
New Federal Guidance on School Discipline and Discrimination
http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/schooldiscipline/index.html
This resource is invaluable in helping to examine data, systems
and practices to problem-solve and action plan around
topics/issues related to cultural responsiveness.
1. Awareness, Knowledge & Skills re: culture impacting behavior
2. PBIS benefits all groups of students
3. Culturally meaningful school-wide expectations
4. Explicit definition of rules across settings
5. Culturally connected lessons
6. Positive adult/student relationships
7. Culturally meaningful acknowledgment system
8. Flowchart for managing behaviors without cultural bias
9. Culturally responsive interventions
10. Culturally responsive family-school partnerships
Renae Azziz, Ed.S, NCSP
Virtuoso Educational Consulting
2012-2013
2013-2014
PBIS is WORKING in PSD 150!

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