fiction-and-nonfiction-power-point-2

Report
Fiction
Non-Fiction
 A made up story
 Has facts that can be
 Can tell about things
checked and proven
 The author is an expert
on this information.
that could happen
 Is read for fun
 Characters may be like
real people or imaginary
Fiction
 Story is created from the
author’s imagination
 Stories are pretend
 Animals or objects can
talk, wear clothes, have
jobs
 People in the story can do
things people cannot
really do
 Story might have funny
pictures
There are three main forms of fiction.
1) Novel: long work of fiction; contains the basic
elements of fiction; may contain subplots along with
the main plot
Subplots: independent related stories
2) Novella: shorter than a novel but longer than a short
story
3) Short Story: brief work of fiction; contains basic
elements of fiction; one main plot; one conflict; most
can be read in one sitting
Mystery (Nancy Drew)
Horror (Goosebumps)
Fantasy (Harry Potter)
Science-fiction (Star Wars)
Myths, Fairytales, Legends (Cinderella)
Historical Fiction (Letters from Rifka)
Nonfiction
 Story is true and factual
 Stories are about real

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
people
Book gives information
Might have maps or real
pictures
Pictures have captions
describing the photograph
An index in the back helps
find information
Might have a glossary
which defines some words
Text that is TRUE and based on REAL
information
Forms of Non-Fiction Text:
Newspapers
Dictionaries
Encyclopedias
Scholastic News
Textbooks
Magazines
Non-Fiction Books
Two broad categories of nonfiction are literary
nonfiction and functional texts.
1) Literary Nonfiction: has elements of fiction; For
example it might use vivid descriptions, a dramatic
writing style, or poetic language.
2) Functional Texts: give instructions, show directions,
explain rules, provide other information that helps
you complete procedures; often use illustrations or
graphics
 Autobiographies and memoirs:
tell the story of the author’s life
 Biographies:
tell the story of someone’s life from the
perspective of another writer
 Letters:
written communications from person to person
 Recipes: tell how to prepare food
 Directions: tell how to operate or assemble equipment
 Schedules: tell when events take place
 Menus: tell which foods are available and their cost
 Brochures: use pictures and text to advertise places or
events
 Maps: are diagrams that show areas of land
 Applications: are written requests to an authority
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how to cook spaghetti
the life of the president of the United States
a person who can jump over a house
flowers that sing
an elephant that wears a ballerina tutu
wild animals that live in Africa
the surface of the moon
which foods are healthy to eat
how to draw a bird
a snowman that comes to life
 Setting
 Character
 Point of View
 Plot
 Theme
 Narrator
the time, place and period in which the action
takes place. Can be a real place or imaginary
The Catcher in the
Rye:New York,
1940s
Lord of the Flies:
deserted island, the
future.
The Bean Trees:
Arizona/Oklahoma
1980s.
Details that describe:
 Furniture
 Scenery
 Customs
 Transportation
 Clothing
 Dialects
 Weather
 Time of day
 Time of year
The people, animals, or things in the
story.
People
Animals
Or Creatures
 Physical appearance of character
 Personality
 Background/personal history
 Motivation
 Relationships
 Conflict
 Does character change?
First person point of
view: The story is told
by a character who
participates in the
action of the story
Third Person point
of view: The story is
told by a narrator
outsie the story
The series of
events and
actions that
takes place in a
story.
The theme of a piece of fiction is its message about life.
It usually contains some insight into the human
condition.
•In most short stories, the theme can be expressed in a
single sentence.
•In longer works of fiction, the central theme is often
accompanied by a number of lesser, related themes, or
there may be two or more central themes.
“Every man needs to feel allegiance
to his native country, whether he
always appreciates that country or
not.”
From “A Man Without a Country” by Edward Hale
•Dialogue is a conversation between two or more
characters.
“Where’s teacher?”
“She’ll be back.”
“She’d better hurry, we’ll miss it!”
From “All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury
 Select a number 1-5
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Haunted House
South Middle School
Walmart
Your house
Mrs. Hand’s classroom
Write three sentences describing your setting. Please be
specific.
 Select a number 1-5
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
You
Scooby Doo
Edward Cullen
Lady Gaga
Minnie Mouse
Write three sentences describing your character.
(Character traits)
 Select a number between 1-3.
From your view point
2. From your character’s view point
3. From a different character’s view point (who?)
1.
 You will take the sentences you just wrote and put the
information together to create a story. (Minimum 2
paragraphs)
 Make sure to tell the story from the perspective of the
name you selected for point of view.

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