Review of family support services

Report
Review of family support services
(including Sure Start Children's Centres)
Locality consultation event
Colin Williams – Head of Resilience, Prevention and Early Intervention
Outline of the event
Time
Activity
9.45am
Welcome and context setting - Colin Williams, Head of Resilience , Prevention and Early
Intervention
10.00am
Table discussion
10.15am
What do we know about the needs of children, young people and families? Steve Foreman, Senior
Performance Analyst
Table discussion
11.00am
Overview of the 3 Models
11.30am
Table discussion
12.15pm
Lunch
12.45
Table discussion
2pm
Expressing a preference
2.30
Close
Context
 Council budget reductions 2013-16
 The Family Services Review
-combination of Sure Start Early Years and Childcare IIA and
Family Services; Combined savings target 2014-16 :
£4.67million
 The wider context:
-The Change for Families Programme
Purpose of today
 Part of a series of locality consultation events
 Open invitation to parents, stakeholders, partners, staff,
elected members, community members
 Day is structured to share with you:
-what has informed the development of the models
-the detail of each of the models


Feedback from all locality events will inform a report to
Newcastle City Council Cabinet in October 2014.
Cabinet will make the decision on the way forward
The programme
 Structured –some presentations from front but majority of time in guided
discussion at tables
 Table discussions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
To look more closely at the data
To review the models: the implications, strengths and challenges of each
To assist individuals to think through the questions
To help each individual make up their own mind
 Facilitators at each table: their role is to support the process, not as experts
in the data or the models
 Project team members around to provide clarification
 What do we know about the needs of
children, young people and families in the
city?
Emp’ment
Health &
Disability
Income
Indices of
Multiple
Deprivation
Crime
Living
Env’ment
Barriers
to
Housing &
Services
Education
Skills &
Training
Introducing the Lower Level Super Output Area (LLSOA)!
32482 LLSOAs across England with 173 in Newcastle
1-10%
1-10%
11-20% 21-30%
21-30%
11-20%
31-40%
41-50%
51-60%
61-70%
71-80%
England
1-10%
Newcastle
11-20%
21-30%
30-100%
81-90%
91-100%
Unauthorised absence
School Absence
Children with Special
Educational needs
Teenage Parents
Children living in poverty
Key Stage 2 results
16+ with no qualifications
Families in receipt of
Unemployment
Child Tax Credit
GCSE results
Children with English as an
additional language
Adult learners
Eligibility for free school
meals
NEET
Household tenure
Breastfeeding
Health problems limiting
activities
Person to bedroom ratio
Long-term mental health
Alcohol related hospital Unpaid carers
Depression and anxiety
problems
admissions
Domestic Violence
Looked After Children
Late ante-natal bookings
Babies with low birth
High BMI at time of anteweight
Child Protection
Obesity
natal booking
Common Assessment
Speech & Language
Framework
Tooth decay
Referrals
Substance misuse
Key Stage 1 results
EYFSP achievement
Newcastle Families
Programme eligibility
Youth offending
Immunisation
Analysis of Need
The Newcastle Context
• 58,385 0-18 year olds live in Newcastle (2011 census)
• 36,904 children of compulsory school age attend Newcastle statefunded schools
• 21% of those children have one or more special educational needs
• 26% are from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, and the
proportion has increased over time
• 21% speak English as an additional language
• 35% live in the 10% most deprived areas nationally
• 50% live in the 20% most deprived areas nationally
• 60% live in the 30% most deprived areas nationally
Narrowing the gap
Newcastle Average
The prevalence of breastfeeding at 6 – 8 weeks
80%
70%
60%
In 2012/13 the gap to National is 2.4 percentage points
In 2009/10 the gap to National is 3.8 percentage points
50%
46.1%
44.7%
40%
2009/10
40.9%
2009/10
30%
20%
10%
National Average
2010/11
47.2%
47.2%
2011/12
2012/13
44.9%
42.2%
40.1%
2010/11
2011/12
2012/13
Health
Obesity in
Year 6
Obesity
Obesity in Year 6
(2010/11)
24.9%
Obesity in Year 6
(2011/12)
25.2%
The proportion of children in year 6 who
are obese has fallen over the past 2 years.
Obesity in
Year 6
Obesity in
Year 6
(2012/13)
1-30% IMD Areas
(2012/13)
1-20% IMD Areas
(2012/13)
1-10% IMD Areas
26.3%
27.2%
27.2%
Obesity in
Year 6
(2012/13)
22.8%
A greater proportion of children
are obese in more deprived areas.
Reception
(12/13)
12.2%
The proportion of children who are
obese almost doubles in the 6 years
between reception and year 6.
National
(2012/13)
18.9%
An additional 4 in every 100 children are obese in
Newcastle compared to the whole country.
Attainment
Key Stage 2- % pupils achieving level 4+ in Reading, Writing and Maths 2012-14
70.0%
80.0%
78.0%
GCSE results - 5+ A*-C grades including
English and Maths 2012-2014
60.0%
76.0%
50.0%
74.0%
72.0%
40.0%
70.0%
30.0%
68.0%
66.0%
20.0%
64.0%
10.0%
62.0%
0.0%
60.0%
2011/12
2012/13
2013/14
1-10% Most Deprived Areas
1-20% Most Deprived Areas
1-30% Most Deprived Areas
All Newcastle
England average
2011/12
2012/13
Attainment
2013/14
Child Protection Plans at end of year 2013/14 by IMD
area
Child Protection Plans at end of year
2013/14 by age group (per 10,000)
120
11%
100
10%
80
60
58%
21%
40
20
0
All
Newcastle
1-10%
11-20%
21-30%
Under 5s
Primary
Secondary
>30% IMD
Vulnerability
Key Messages:
We have undertaken a comprehensive needs analysis across a broad range of
indicators for children, young people and families. We have covered a handful of
outcomes in this presentation but they reflect the wider findings from the needs
analysis.
While outcomes across the majority of indicators are improving there remain clear
links between poorer outcomes and deprivation.
There is evidence of improvement in outcomes in areas of higher deprivation but we
need to sustain the faster rate of improvement in those areas in order to narrow the
gaps.
Overview of the 3 models
 Family services review - Services and Budgets in scope
 The Wellbeing Care & Learning Early Help and Supporting
Families offer
 The 3 models:
-variations with increasing emphasis through model 1 to model 3 on a
Community Family Hub offer, with resource implications on offer for targeted
groups and statutory functions
Statutory Support Functions
£ 418,680
Family Support
£1,476,960
Family Services Review
(13% of budget in scope)
Commissioned Family Support
Services and Budgets in Scope
Senior Parenting Practitioners including
evidenced based parenting programmes
Services fully/partially funded through
Newcastle Families Programme:








Integrated Working Mentors
Strengthening Families
Coordination
Video Interaction Guidance
Family Support Volunteer Project
Linhope Referral Unit Family
Support
Community Family Intervention
Project
Contribution to Your Homes
Newcastle Family Intervention
Project
Contribution to Changing Trax
Sure Start Children’s Centres
£5,696,350
(48% of budget in scope)
Direct funding for 15 Sure Start Children’s
Centres providing citywide coverage
delivered by either Newcastle City
Council or commissioned partners and all
commissioned services
(3% of budget in scope)
Parent Partnership Service
Childcare Sufficiency
Early Years and Childcare Workforce
Development
Support for the provision of leisure facilities
for children and young people
Targeted Support Services £2,658,800
(23% of budget in scope)
£11.7 million
Counselling support for looked after children
Targeted mental health in schools
Early years foundation stage Consultancy for
schools
Language Impairment Team – support for
school age children
Early Years Speech and Language Therapy
Kaleidoscope –
Crisis Response Service
Intensive Intervention Programme – youth
offending
Commissioned youth work
Supported Childcare Places
£1,515,400
(13% of budget in scope)
69 places across the 5 Community Nurseries
Commission with Bridgewater School nursery
Contribution to Scotswood Village Nursery
Community Family Hub
Citywide
Family Support Offer
Offer based on geography with increasing areas of the city
Community
Family
being covered from model
1 through to Hub
model 3.
What must we consider?

l
Statutory Support Functions:
(not subject to
inspection)
Statutory Supportexternal
Functions:
(not subject to
Level of resource available reduces from model 1 to model 3
Council priorities and the Adminstration’s commitments
- Tackling inequalities
Protecting Sure Start in most disadvantaged
external inspection)
Level
of
resource
available
reduces
from
model
1
to
- model
 Full Sure Start Children’s Centre statutory offer which
communities
 Parent Partnership Service– independent support for parents
families from pre -birth to 5 (Subject to external
3supports
reflecting
the
increase
in
resources
for
the
Community
Offer based
on geography with increasing areas ofStatutory
the city
with children
withSpecial
Disability
Level of resource available
reduces
fromEducational
model Needs
1 to and
model
3
and regulatory requirements
inspection
by Ofsted)
 Childcare Sufficiency– duty to secure sufficient childcare for
 Family
Intensive
working
across
the age
range
Hubfamily
across
3 models.
being whole
covered
fromall
model
1 through
to model 3 Newcastle Families Programme outcomes
parents in work/training
according to identified need
 Family support volunteers development

Assessment of need in the city

- based intervention
Commitment to early, evidence
Help
Support
function:
 Early
Full
Sure
Start
Children’s
Centre
offer which
supports
In additionaccess
to Citywide
Family Support
Offerstatutory
outlined
 Building
on what works

below


families
from of
pre-birth
5 (Subject
to external
by
The majority
familiesto
where
additional
support isinspection
required will
What
must
we consider?
Ofsted)
achieve positive outcomes through an integrated team around
Citywide Family Support Offer
 Information, advice, guidance and training for early years and
childcare providers
Parent Partnership Service – independent support for
Sector support to secure recreation and leisure activities
children
and young
people up to theNeeds
age of 19 and
parents with childrenforwith
Special
Educational
Disability
the family drawn from universal service
e.g.priorities
schools and the Administration’s
 provision,
commitments
Support
for target
Intensive
whole family working across
theCouncil
age range
according to
groups

Childcare Sufficiency – duty to secure sufficient childcare for
Level ofand
resource
available
reduces
from model
1 to model
health
visiting.
Where
the family
and the team are struggling
Priorities:
3 reflecting
the increase
identified
needin resources for the Community
Levelparents
of resource
available
reduces
from
model 1 to model 3
Support
for target
groups

Tackling
inequalities
in work/training
to make
to achieve outcomes, the skills of an early help
Family Hub
across progress
all 3 models.
In
tackling
inequalities
with
fewer
resources
we
should:
In tackling inequalities with fewer resources we should:
Level of resource available reduces from model 1 to model 3
advisor
can
be volunteers
drawn upon.development
Early Help
Family
support
Support
function:
 with
Protecting
Sure Start
most
disadvantaged
 Work
universal services
to enable
to better
meet advice, guidance and training for early years
 inthem
Information,

Priorities:
 them
Targeted
mentalthe
health in schools
the needs of children with poorer life
 The majority
of families
where will
additional
is  practitioners
Early help
advisors
worksupport
alongside
universal
Work within universal
services to enablechances
better meet
communities
andtochildcare
providers
required
will achieve
outcomes
through an
 Targeted mental health in schools
In addition
- positive
access
to Citywide
Family Support Offer
outlined

Prioritise
reso urces for children, young people and
services
and their
role drawn
wouldfrom
include:
integrated
team around
the family
universal

Counselling support
for Looked
After
Children
needs of children
poorer
 Counselling
Families with
at greatest
need life chances
support
for Looked
After Children
below
service
provision, e.g. schools and health visiting. Where

Statutory
and regulatory requirements
 / services
Sector
support to secure
recreation
leisure
 Support
for school ageand
asylum
seekers, activities
refugees and for
new
Signs
Safety
consultation
with progress
the Team
Around
the
 Family
Shift resources from targeted groups
to
the -family
andofthe
team are
struggling to make
 people
Support
for
school
age
asylum
seekers, refugees and new
international
arrivals
community whole
family working

Prioritise resources
for children,
young
and
families
at
to achieve outcomes, the skills of an early help advisor
children
and
young
people
up
to
the
age
of
19
facilitating
information
sharing
between
agencies
to
support

NewcastleFocus
Families
Programme outcomes
 Speech and Language support in schools
can be drawn upon.
international
arrivals
our effort on preventative interventions
by prioritising
greatest need
 Early
 Speech and language support in early years
help advisors
work alongside practitioners in
whole
family will
assessments
younger children
universal services and t heir role would include:
 Support
for children
risk of anti- social behaviour and / or

Assessment
of need
in thelinkcity

Speech
and
Language
support
in atschools

Recognise
the
strong
betw
een
economic
- Signs
of Safetyand
consultation
with the
Team Around
- support
challenge
to teams
around
family(TAF)
the theShift
resources
from targeted groups / services to community at risk of becoming involved in criminal activity
disadvantage and poor outcomes for children
Family
 Targeted
youth support
for vulnerable
 intervention
Speech and language
support
in early
years young people
Commitment
to early, evidence-based
- directinformation
work with
families
until
a TAFto isin place
whole
family working
- facilitating
sharing
between
agencies
 Crisis response service– for families with a child with a
support whole family assessments
- identify
intensive
support
required

Support
for children disability
at risk of anti-social behaviour and / or
- support
andwhere
challenge
to teams around
the is
family

Building
what
(TAF)
Focus
ouron
effort
onworks
preventative interventions
by prioritising
 Early Years Foundation Stage Consultan cy in schools
- direct work with familiesuntil a TAF is in place
Workforce development:
at risk of becoming involved in criminal activity
younger children
- identify where intensive support is required


Targeted youth support for vulnerable young people
Recognise the strong link between economic disadvantage and
Supported Childcare Places
 Access

Crisis response service – for families with a child with a
to specialist
training to enable
practitioners
to practitioners
Access
to specialist
training
to enable
to work with
poor outcomes
for children
Workforce development:


work with families with complex needs
families with complex needs
Access to supervision support for universal services
supporting
families
with complex needs
Access
to supervision
support for universal
with complex
needs
Evidencefamilies
based parenting
programmes
Based on assessment of need, the offer includes the following
parenting programmes:
- Incredible Years
Evidence
based parenting
programmes
- Strengthening
Families
- on
Triple
P
Based
assessment
of need, the offer includes
- Parent Factor inADHD
parenting programmes:
- Incredible Years
- Strengthening Families
- Triple P
- Parent Factor in ADHD
Wellbeing Care
Level of resource reduces from model 1 to model 2
Wellbeing
Careand
andLearning
Learning
disability
following an overall budget reduction of 35%
Supported
Childcare
Places
services supporting
Early Help and Supporting

Early Years Foundation
Stage Consultancy in schools
Access to funded Early Learning and Childcare places for
Early Help and
Supporting
Families Children under 5 as part of an assessed plan
Families
Offer
Offer Level of resource reduces from model 1 to model 2
the following
following an overall budget reduction of 35%
Access to funded Early Learning and Childcare places for children
under 5 as part of an assessed plan
Reach Area for
Community Family Hub
(Model 1)
Reach Area for
Community Family Hub
(Model 2)
Reach Area for
Community Family Hub
(Model 3)
Table discussion
 Reviewing the models
 Working through the consultation
questions
Letting Us Know What You think
 The purpose of the consultation is to get the views of as
many people as possible - families, staff, community
members, partners and other stakeholders on how the
resource remaining after the £4.67 million has been taken
from the budget. There is £7.1 million to spend on services
for children, young people and families.
 Please consider the questions throughout the event. You will
be invited to express your views and express a preference
for one of the models at the close of the day.
What happens next?
Date
Activity
September 2014
Locality consultation events on the models
October
Cabinet report and decision on which model to
develop further
November
Work with existing providers to reshape provision in
line with Cabinet’s decision to be ready for delivery
in April 2015
April 2015
Savings achieved
April 2015-March 2016
Development and commissioning of new investment
model
April 2016
Delivery of new investment model

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