PCC Doctrine 2015 Update 4 Mar 13 serious

Report
As of 4 February 2013
United States Army Combined Arms Center
Doctrine 2015 Overview
Army Doctrine
Publications (ADP)
ADRP 3-28
[15 ADPs]
Fundamental
principles
Army Doctrine Reference
Publications (ADRP)
[1 per ADP]
Detailed information on
fundamentals
Field Manuals (FM)
[50 FMs]
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Tactics and Procedures
Army Techniques Pubs (ATP)
Authenticated version on APD
Input through wiki version
Techniques
Techniques
United States Army Combined Arms Center
Techniques
Techniques
Techniques
Techniques
2
Army Doctrine Publications (ADP)
• A Department of the Army Publication that contains the “Fundamental principles by
which the military forces or elements thereof guide their actions in support of national
objectives. It is authoritative but requires judgment in application (JP 1-02).”
•Explains the fundamentals of the subject and how these support ADP 3-0, Operations.
• ADP 1 (The Army), 3-0 (Unified Land Operations), 7-0 (Training), and 6-22 (Army Leadership)
are approved by the Chief of Staff of the Army. All other ADPs approved by the CAC CG.
•Generally limited to approximately 10 pages.
VideoBook
Demo
United States Army Combined Arms Center
3
Army Doctrine Reference Publications (ADRP)
ADRP 3-28
• ADPs are supported by an ADRP - “detailed explanation of all doctrinal principles
which provide the foundational understanding so everyone in the Army can interpret
it the same way.”
• Army Doctrine (Department of the Army Publication) of less than 100 pages and
approved by the CAC CG.
IMI
Demo
United States Army Combined Arms Center
4
Field Manuals (FM)
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
Field
Manual
• Army Doctrine (Department of the Army Publication) that lays out tactics and procedures:
• Main body (maximum of 200 pages) contains tactics -“The employment and ordered
arrangement of forces in relation to each other (JP 1-02).”
• Appendices contain procedures - “standard, detailed steps that prescribe how to
perform specific tasks (JP 1-02”). Procedures require stringent adherence to steps
without variance.
• Describes how the Army executes operations described in ADP.
• FMs are approved by the CAC CG as the TRADOC proponent for Army Doctrine.
• There will be 50 FMs.
Doctrine
Knowledge Map
Demo
United States Army Combined Arms Center
5
Doctrine 2015 FMs
FM 3-07
FM 3-90/1
FM 3-90/2
Stability
Operations
Offense
And
Defense
Recon,
Security
and
Enabling
Tasks
FM 2-0
FM 3-05
FM 3-09
FM 4-95
Intelligence
Army
Special
Operations
Field
Artillery
Operations
Logistics
Operations
Decisive Action
FM 5-02
FM 27-10
FM 6-99
FM 7-15
Operational
Environment
The Law of
Land
Warfare
Report and
Message
Format
Army
Universal
Task List
FM 6-0
Commander
and Staff
Officer
Guidance
FM 3-95
FM 3-96
FM 3-97
FM 3-98
Infantry
Brigade
Combat
Team
Operations
Armored
Brigade
Combat
Team
Operations
Stryker
Brigade
Combat
Team
Operations
Recon and
Security
Organizations
Warfighting Functions
Reference Publications
FM 1-0
Human
Resources
Support
FM 1-04
Legal
Support to
the
Operational
Army
FM 3-53
Military
Information
Support
Operations
FM 1-05
FM 1-06
FM 3-01
FM 3-04
FM 3-11
FM 3-34
FM 3-39
FM 3-55
Religious
Support
Financial
Management
Operations
Air and
Missile
Defense
Operations
Aviation
Operations
CBRN
Operations
Engineer
Operations
Military
Police
Operations
Information
Collection
FM 3-57
Civil
Affairs
FM 3-61
Army
Public
Affairs
FM 4-01
Transportation
FM 4-02
FM 4-30
FM 4-40
FM 6-02
Army
Health
System
Ordnance
Operations
Quartermaster
Operations
Signal
Support to
Operations
Branches
FM 2-22.3
FM 3-13
FM 3-14
FM 3-16
FM 3-22
FM 3-24
FM 7-22
HUMINT
Collector
Operations
Inform and
Influence
Activities
Army
Space
Operations
Multinational
Operations
Army
Support to
Security
Cooperation
Counterinsurgency
Army
Physical
Readiness
Training
FM 3-27
FM 3-38
FM 3-50
FM 3-52
FM 3-63
FM 3-99
Personnel
Recovery
Airspace
Control
Internment
and
Resettlement
Airborne
and Air
Assault
Operations
Army Global
Ballistic
Missile
Defense
Operations
CyberElectromagn
etic
Activities
Types of Operations/Activities
Special
Category
Other
Echelons
FM 3-81
Maneuver
Enhancement
BDE
FM 3-94
Echelons
Above
Brigade
Army Techniques Pubs
Departmental
Publication
On Wiki Site –
Feeder for changes
to approved pub
Techniques
Techniques
Techniques
Techniques
Techniques
Techniques
Draft
Techniques
Draft
Techniques
Draft
Techniques
Draft
Techniques
Draft
Techniques
Draft
Techniques
• Publications that contain techniques - “Non-prescriptive ways or methods used to
perform missions, functions, or tasks (JP 1-02).”
• Each authenticated techniques pub has a draft version on a Wiki site:
• Wiki version allows input from the field to rapidly change approved publication
• Each technique pub has an assigned proponent responsible for monitoring input
via Wiki and making changes to the authenticated publication.
• No limit on the size of techniques or how many separate documents.
•Approval authority is the proponent.
United States Army Combined Arms Center
7
Doctrine 2015
Transition Timeline
 31 Aug 2012:
ADP/ADRPs complete
Done (except ADRPs 1 & 3-28)
 31 Dec 2013:
All Doctrine 2015 FMs complete
 31 Dec 2015:
All remaining knowledge transitioned to Army
Techniques Publications with a draft version of
each on a milwiki site
United States Army Combined Arms Center
8
UNCLASSIFIED
ADP 1 – The Army
The Army’s Roles
Prevent
Shape
Win
The Army’s Mission Fight and win the Nation’s wars
through prompt and sustained land
combat, as part of the joint force
Core Competencies
ADP 1
THE ARMY
Combined arms maneuver
Wide area security
Our
Profession
Trust
Military Expertise
Esprit de Corps
Honorable Service
Stewardship
Military & civilian
professionals
Enabling Competencies
Security cooperation
Force Tailoring
Entry operations
Mission command
Support joint & Army forces
DSCA
Mobilize & integrate the
Reserve Components
Our Continuing Duty
SEPTEMBER 2012
DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION:
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
Win the current fight
Develop the Future Army
Maintain reserve readiness
All-volunteer force
Develop future leaders
Strengthen the profession
Soldiers for life
The Army is Landpower
United States Army Combined Arms Center
As of 19 SEP12
9
1905
1910
1913
1914
1923
1939
1941
1944
1949
1954
1962
The 19th edition of
the Army’s capstone
operational doctrine
1968
1976
1982
1986
1993
2001
2008
2011
1905-1938: Field Service Regulations
1939-2000: FM 100-5, Operations
2001-2008: FM 3-0, Operations
2011: ADP/ADRP 3-0, Unified Land Operations
Reasons for Change
• Significant recent operational experience
10
• Evolving policy and doctrine
• Joint and Army
transformation
A Blueprint
for an Uncertain Future
10
Enduring Themes
• Emphasis on Leadership and Soldiers
• Importance of Initiative
• Mission Command
• The Operational Environment
• Simultaneous Offense, Defense, Stability or DSCA
• Concept of Combat Power
2008
• Warfighting Functions
• Operations Process
• Joint Interdependence
• Principles of War
• Operational Art
• Unified Action
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
11
Changes
New, Added, or Significantly Modified
• Range of Military Operations
• Operational Concept - Unified Land Operations
• Decisive Action
• Core Competencies
• Tenets
• Operational Art
2008
• Army Design Methodology
• Operational Framework
Eliminated
• Full Spectrum Operations
• Spectrum of Conflict
• Operational Themes
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
12
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
13
Range of Military Operations
ROMO replaces both
Spectrum of Conflict and
Operational Themes
Arms Control and Disarmament (JP 3-0)
Noncombatant Evacuation (JP 3-68)
Civil Support/DSCA (JP 3-28 and FM 3-28)
Peace Operations (JP 3-07.3)
Combating Terrorism (JP 3-07.2)
Raid (FM 3-90)
Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction
(JP 3-40)
Recovery Operations (JP 3-50 and FM 3-50.1)
Counterinsurgency (JP 3-24 and FM 3-24)
Security Force Assistance (AR 12-1 and
FM 3-07.1)
Enforcement of Sanctions (JP 3-0)
Show of Force (JP 3-0)
Foreign Humanitarian Assistance (JP 3-29)
Stability Operations (FM 3-07)
Foreign Internal Defense (JP 3-22 and
FM 3-05.202)
Strike (JP 3-0)
Homeland Defense (JP 3-27 and FM 3-28)
Unconventional Warfare (JP 3-05 and FM 3-05)
Large-scale Combat (FM 3-90)
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
14
The Operational Environment
Anticipated Operational
Environment
• US must project power into region,
opposed.
A composite of the conditions, circumstances, and influences
that affect the employment of capabilities and bear on the
decisions of the commander (JP 1-02).
OPERATIONAL VARIABLES
MISSION VARIABLES
• US must seize at least one base of
operations (maybe more).
• Threat of WMD will require dispersal
of US forces and decentralized
operations.
• Size of theater (space and
population) will exceed US ability to
control.
Operational Environment replaces battlespace as a term.
Operational Environment is not the Area of Operations.
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
15
The Operating Concept
“The Army’s operating concept is the core of its doctrine. It must
be uniformly known and understood within the Service . . .”
Unified Land Operations
…describes how the Army seizes, retains, and exploits the initiative to
gain and maintain a position of relative advantage in sustained land
operations through simultaneous offensive, defensive, and stability
operations in order to prevent or deter conflict, prevail in war, and create
the conditions for favorable conflict resolution.
Unified Land Operations replaces
Full Spectrum Operations as the
Army’s Operational Concept
The operating concept describes how Army forces adapt to meet the distinct
requirements of unified land operations . . . broad enough to describe
operations now and in the near future . . . flexible enough to apply in any
situation worldwide.
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
16
Decisive Action
- The simultaneous combinations of offensive, defensive, and
stability or defense support of civil authorities tasks.
- Operations outside the U. S. and its territories simultaneously
combine three elements—offense, defense, and stability.
- Within the U. S. and its territories, decisive action combines the
elements of defense support of civil authorities (DSCA) and, as
required, offense and defense to support homeland defense.
- The emphasis on different elements of decisive action changes
with echelon, time, and location.
Decisive Action replaces Full Spectrum Operations as the Army term for
simultaneous combinations of Offense, Defense, and Stability/DSCA tasks.
Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA) replaces Civil Support
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
17
Army Core Competencies
- Combined Arms Maneuver - is the application of the elements of
combat power in unified action to defeat enemy ground forces; to
seize, occupy, and defend land areas; and to achieve physical,
temporal, and psychological advantages over the enemy to seize
and exploit the initiative.
- Wide Area Security - is the application of the elements of combat
power in unified action to protect populations, forces, infrastructure,
and activities; to deny the enemy positions of advantage; and to
consolidate gains in order to retain the initiative.
- Combined arms maneuver and wide area security provide the Army
a focus and construct for understanding how Army forces use
combined arms to achieve success.
- As core competencies, they uniquely define what the Army
provides the joint force commander .
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
18
Operational Art
Operational art is cognitive approach by commanders and staffs—supported by their skill, knowledge,
experience, creativity, and judgment—to develop strategies, campaigns, and operations to
organize and employ military forces by integrating ends, ways, and means (JP 3-0)
Elements of Operational Art
End state and conditions
Basing
Center of Gravity*
Tempo
Decisive points*
Phasing and transitions
Lines of Operations and Lines of Effort*
Culmination*
Operational reach*
Risk
(* Common to elements of operational design)
- For Army forces, operational art is the pursuit of strategic objectives, in whole or in part, through the
arrangement of tactical actions in time, space, and purpose.
- Operational art applies to all aspects of operations and integrates ends, ways, and means,
while accounting for risk, across the levels of war.
- Operational art spans a continuum—from comprehensive strategic direction to concrete
tactical actions.
- Army commanders plan and execute major operations, battles, engagements, and activities to
achieve military objectives in support of the joint force commander’s campaign plan.
The Army does not conduct campaigns.
Joint force headquarters plan and execute campaigns and major operations, while
Service…components of the joint force conduct subordinate supporting and
supported major operations, battles, and engagements, not independent campaigns.
JP 5-0, page II-22
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
19
Operational Framework
Operational Framework
Decisive-Shaping-Sustaining
Deep-Close-Security
Main-Supporting Efforts
The operational framework has three ways to conceptually organize
operations.
Decisive-Shaping-Sustaining Operations: The decisive-shaping
sustaining framework lends itself to a broad conceptual orientation based on
purpose.
Deep-Close-Security Operations: Historically associated with terrain
orientation, but can be also applied to temporal and organizational
orientations. ADRP 3-0 defines deep, close, and support areas.
Main and Support Efforts: The main and supporting efforts framework
focuses on prioritizing effort among subordinate units.
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
20
Linear AO
Authorities/Responsibilities
when assigned an AO
XX
OBJ
X
MEB
DIV
X AO
BCT AO
•Terrain Management
•Intelligence Collection
•Civil Affairs Activities
•Movement Control (air/ground)
•Clearance of Fires
•Security
•Personnel Recovery
•Environmental Considerations
OBJ
Main
X
X
SUST
X
OBJ
BCT AO
Support Area
Close Area
Deep Area
Support Area
Close Area
Deep Area
BCT AO
BCT AO
X
MEB AO
BCT AO
X
MEB AO
X
BCT AO
X
X
X
X
X
DIV
X
Main
X
X
X
Non-Linear &
Non-Contiguous AO
X
X
X
Main
BCT AO
SUST
DIV
X
BCT AO
X
SUST
Non-Linear &
Contiguous AO
21
Other
Doctrine
A Blueprint for an Uncertain Future
Mission Command and
The Operations Process
23
23
Evolving Concepts of Mission Command
Constant
1982
1993
2001
2008
2012
Art of Command, Science of Control, CDR’s Intent, Unity of Command, Initiative, Mission Orders
Mission Command (Philosophy)
2010
Mission command replaces
battle command and C2
Evolving
Battle Command (Enemy oriented)
Command, Control,
Communications
C2 Battlefield Operation System
• Known enemy
• Top down understanding
and detailed control
• Static command post and
staff oriented processes
• Limited network
Cold War
Panama
Desert Storm
AirLand
Battle
(1982)
Balkans
War &
MOOTW
(1993)
MC WFF
• Complex environments across
the range of military operations
• Bottom up understanding and
more decentralized control
• Commander centric
• Network enabled
• Technological advances
• Lessons learned
Somalia
C2 WFF
Afghanistan
Iraq
FSO
(2001)
Persistent conflict
FSO/
Modular
Force
(2008)
Unified
Land
Operations
(2012)
24
Central Idea of Mission Command
Nature of Operations
Army forces conduct operations in a
complex, ever-changing, and uncertain operational environment
across a range of military operations.
To win in this environment the Army
exercises …
Mission Command (A Philosophy of Command)
Exercise of authority and direction by the commander using mission
orders to enable disciplined initiative within the commander’s intent to
empower agile and adaptive leaders in the conduct of unified land
operations.
Executed through the…
Mission Command Warfighting Function
The related tasks and systems that develop and integrate those activities enabling a
commander to balance the art of command and the science of control
in order to integrate the other warfighting functions.
The Army’s approach to mission command unifies the
philosophy of command with the warfighting function.
Mission Command
Exercise of authority and direction by the
commander using mission orders to enable
disciplined initiative within the commander’s intent
to empower agile and adaptive leaders in the
conduct of unified land operations.
Guides
Mission Command Warfighting Function
The related tasks and systems that develop and
integrate those activities enabling a commander to
balance the art of command and the science of
control in order to integrate the other warfighting
functions.
The principles of mission command assist commanders and staff in balancing the
Art of Command with the Science of Control
- Build cohesive teams through mutual trust
- Create shared understanding
- Provide a clear commander's intent
- Exercise disciplined initiative
- Use mission orders
- Accept prudent risk
As a warfighting function, mission command consists of the related tasks and a mission command system
that support the exercise of authority and direction by the commander.
Commander Tasks:
• Drive the operations process through the activities
of understand, visualize, describe, direct, lead and
assess
• Develop teams, both within their own
organizations and with unified action partners
• Inform and influence audiences, inside and
outside their organizations
Leads
Supports
Staff Tasks:
• Conduct the operations process (plan, prepare,
execute, assess)
• Conduct knowledge management and information
management
• Conduct inform and influence activities
• Conduct cyber electromagnetic activities
The mission command system enables the exercise
of authority and direction by the commander.
Mission Command System:
- Personnel
- Networks
- Information Systems
- Processes and Procedures
- Facilities and Equipment
Together mission command and the mission command warfighting function guides, integrates, and
synchronizes Army forces throughout the conduct of unified land operations.
Mission Command and Doctrine 2015
FM 3-61
FM 3-57
FM 6-0
Civil
Affairs
Public
Affairs
Operations
Commander
and Staff
Organization
and
Operations
FM 3-13
FM 3-52
FM 6-02
Inform and
Influence
Activities
Airspace
Control
Signal
Support to
Operations
FM 3-53
Military
Information
Support
Operations
27
FM 3-38
CyberElectromagnetic
Activities
Techniques
Techniques
Techniques
Techniques
ADP 5-0 and ADRP 5-0
• Central Idea
• Principles of the Operations Process
• Planning
• Preparing
• Executing
• Assessing
Central Idea
The Operations Process
The Army’s framework for exercising mission command is the operations process—the
major mission command activities performed during operations: planning, preparing,
executing, and continuously assessing the operation.
Central idea…
Commanders, supported by their staffs, use
the operations process to drive the
conceptual and detailed planning necessary
to understand,
visualize, and describe their
Guided by the principles of…
operational environment; make and
articulate decisions; and direct, lead, and
assess military operations.
Guided by the principles of…
- Commanders drive the operations process
- Apply critical and creative thinking
- Build and maintain situational understanding - Encourage collaboration and
dialogue
29
29
Principles of the Operations Process
Commanders drive the operations process
The commander’s role in the
operations process was formerly
know as “battle command”.
Commanders are the most important participants in the operations process. While
staffs perform essential functions that amply the effectiveness of operations,
commanders
drive the operations process through understanding, visualizing,
30
describing, directing, leading, and assessing operations.
30
Principles of the Operations Process
Commanders drive the operations process (continued)
The commander’s intent is a clear and concise expression of the
purpose of the operation and the desired military end state that supports
mission command, provides focus to the staff, and helps subordinate and
supporting commanders act to achieve the commander’s desired results
without further orders, even when the operation does not unfold as
planned (JP 3-0).
• Adopts joint definition of commander’s
The commander’s intent includes:
intent
• Reintroduces “key tasks” as a
component of the commander’s intent
• Purpose - an expanded description of the operation’s purpose
beyond the “why” of the mission statement.
• Key tasks – those significant activities the force as a whole must
perform to achieve the desired end state.
• End state – a description of the desired future conditions that
represent success.
31
Planning
Planning is the art and science of understanding a situation, envisioning
a desired future, and laying out effective ways of bringing that future
about (ADP 5-0).
• Commanders focus planning.
• Army design methodlogy
• Develop simple, flexible plans
• Military decisionmaking
through mission orders.
Process
• Optimize available planning
• Troop leading procedures
time.
• Continually refine the plan.
Army planning methodologies
Guidelines for effective planning
Planning results in a plan and orders that communicates a common
vision and synchronize the action of forces in time, space, and purpose
to achieve objectives and accomplish missions.
• Retitles “design” to “Army design methodlogy”
• Modifies step 7 of the MDMP from “orders production” to “orders production,
dissemination, and transition”.
• Details of the MDMP, TLP, and the OPORD format is now in ATTP 5-0.1.
32
Execution
Execution is putting a plan into action by applying combat
power to accomplish the mission (ADP 5-0).
*
33
Doctrine 2015 FM 6-0
FM 6-0
Commander
and Staff
Organization
and
Operations
Blue = New Material
• Ch 1: Mission Command & Operations Process Overview
• Ch 2: Command Post Organization and Operations
• Ch 3: Staff Duties and Responsibilities
• Ch 4: Managing Knowledge and Information
• Ch 5: Critical and Creative Thinking
• Ch 6: Problem Solving
• Ch 7: Staff Studies
• Ch 8: Decision Papers
• Ch 9: Military Briefings
• Ch 10: Running Estimates
• Ch 11: The Military Decisionmaking Process
• Ch 12: Troop Leading Procedures
• Ch 13: Military Deception
• Ch 14: Rehearsals
• Ch 15: Liaison
• Ch 16: Assessment Plans
• Ch 17: After Action Reviews
• App A: Army Command and Support Relationships
• App B: Plans and Orders Formats
• App C: Annex Formats
34
ADP/ADRP 7-0
Training Units and Developing Leaders
UNCLASSIFIED
Doctrine
Overview
Concepts
How-To
Unit Training Management
on the Army Training Network (ATN)
https://atn.army.mil
• Train leaders to train . . . achieve “training overmatch” and return to commander-centric training
• Army’s Operations & Training Management Processes are the same: plan, prepare, execute and assess
• Integrate leader development objectives into training objectives using Training Management Process
• Web-based tools (ATN/CATS/DTMS) enable training management
35
FM 3-22
•
Framework for Army forces to support Combatant
Commander’s objectives by, with, and through Theater
Armies that:
 build defense and security relationships and
promote specific U.S. security interests
 develop friendly and allied military capabilities for
self-defense and multinational operations
 provide U.S. forces with peacetime and contingency
access to host nations
•
In-depth discussion of how the Army plans, prepares,
executes and assesses security cooperation activities and
associated tasks
•
Focuses on security cooperation planning, execution and
the attributes of the advisor in Unified Land Operations
across the range of military operations.
•
Combined fundamentals of Security Cooperation, Security
Assistance, Security Force Assistance and Foreign
Internal Development.
22
United States Army Combined Arms Center
36
Important Web Sites
The Army Publishing Directorate (go to Doctrine and Training Publications on the Publications pulldown menu) - http://www.apd.army.mil/
The Doctrinal Term update section that only includes quarterly doctrinal term changes (current quarter
changes): https://www.milsuite.mil/book/docs/DOC-25269
An "Army Doctrine Term Changes Historical Database" that provides current and past terminology
changes (perpetual living document): https://www.milsuite.mil/book/docs/DOC-40298
Current Army doctrine terminology can be found at the "Army Dictionary“ JDEIS website. This website
is updated once a month in an effort to maintain current Army doctrine terminology (terms and
acronyms). https://jdeis.js.mil/jdeis/index.jsp?pindex=207
United States Army Combined Arms Center

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