Focus of today`s presentation

Report
Customizing Content Delivery
Systems Using Lean/Agile/Six
Sigma for Improved
International Student Success
Henry Griffith – Adjust Instructor, College of Engineering
Riad Ajami – Director, Center for Global Business
Angela Griffith – Assistant Dean, College of Engineering
Wright State University
Dayton OH
June 14th, 2014
Presentation Summary
• Objective
• Motivation
• WSU EGR Math Sequence/EGR 1980 Course Structure
• Student Performance/Satisfaction
• Conclusions
Objective
• To demonstrate how proven best practices from
industry (agile/lean design, statistical quality control
methodologies) serve as natural solutions for inherent
challenges associated with education of
internationally mobile students in US public
institutions
The resource paradox in US public higher ed
institutions
Demand for
Resources
Supporting
Internationally
Mobile
Students
Resource
Gap
Availability
of
Resources
Additional challenges in servicing
internationally mobile students
Unique Challenge
Proposed Remedy
Resource gap
Lean system design
Discrepancy between applications and
enrollment
Agility in system design
Variability in prerequisite preparation
Agility in system design
Unique challenges for ELL, acclimation issues Six Sigma/ SPC in content delivery
in US
Unique Challenges at WSU – Spring 2014
Variability in preparation, but how
much….?
N=65, predominately Kuwait
Engineering Mathematics Sequence at WSU
Focus of today’s presentation
EGR 1980 – Historical Delivery Structure
Traditional sequential
linear progression lacks
agility to accommodate
high levels of variability in
student preparation
EGR 1980 – Modified Structure
Large
Data sets
Enable
SIX-SIGMA to
drive AGILITY in
implementation
MPL retake
optimizes
LEANness
to end user
Adaptive learning system drives AGILITY
Adaptive learning system drives AGILITY
Room for improvement?
Drive parameter optimization (“refresh rate”, etc) through data
Error in ALEKS CL Estimate - Class Exam % - ALEKS Score by Topic
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Robustness to preparation level?
1
10
0.5
5
0
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95
MPL 0
10
0
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95
MPL 1
5
5
0
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95
MPL 2
0
1
20
0.5
10
0
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95
MPL 4
0
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95
MPL 3
5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95
Total Class
Student Efficiency in ALEKS
250
200
T
o
p
i
c 150
s
L
e
a 100
r
n
e
d
50
R² = 0.2428
0
0
20
40
60
80
Hours in ALEKS Platform
100
120
140
160
Relationship Between Time in ALEKS and InClass Examination
100%
90%
A
v
e
r
a
g
e
E
x
a
m
S
c
o
r
e
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
R² = 0.0775
20%
10%
0%
0
20
40
60
80
Hours in ALEKS
100
120
140
160
Student Satisfaction
• 83% of respondents first time using a course with
online learning system
• Usability of ALEKS – 4.02 (1 – very difficult, 5 – very
simple)
• 54% of respondents confident in ability to master
topics in ALEKS not yet covered in lecture
• 88% would re-enroll in an ALEKS based course
Conclusions
• Expanding enrollment and diversity in preparation of internationally
mobile students demands sophisticated solutions to meet unique
needs of population
• Best practices in business, such as lean/agile design and statistical
quality control, are natural solutions for addressing unique challenges
• Through modularized, system based design, solutions developed for
internationally mobile students may be used to drive pedagogical
improvements for all students involved

similar documents