International Service 101, Part 2

Report
1. Getting Started

Take responsibility to make it happen in
your club
–
Start with your passion
 Water,
–
–
–
–
literacy, health, etc.--or Region + Needs
Get club President & Board Support
Get a WCS line item budget commitment
Recruit committee members
Learn, study; develop experience & skills
2. Do Some Basic Homework


Read about Humanitarian Service on
www.Rotary.org and D5100WCS.org including:
Guide to Matching Grants (form 141en at
www.Rotary.org/RIdocuments) http://bit.ly/I7Nh7s

Study the booklets, forms, spreadsheets &
checklist on our District 5100 website
–

D5100WCS.org
Imagine you lived in the village … how would
you assess, prioritize & begin to meet needs?
3. Attend Our Project
Exchanges/Workshops

District Level: Every 3rd Wednesday at the
District Office in Wilsonville
–
–
4:00-5:30 PM
Ask to be on Pmail list



[email protected]
[email protected] (after June 30)
Attend a successful club’s International
Service committee meeting
–
List available on our website
4. Finding a Project--1

Team up with a project underway with another
club in our district
–
–
–

$500 to $5,000
Come to our monthly exchanges, read pmail, notes
Call clubs … collaborate
Find available projects: D5100WCS.org,
MatchingGrants.org, ProjectLink and Wasrag.org
– Homework & due diligence is always required
4. Finding a Project--2

Use existing connections & relationships:
–
–
–



Y.E. & G.S.E.
Friendship Exchange
Personal travel, International Business
Project Fairs – in person or electronic
Partners in Service
RAGM.org … Wasrag.org … other RAGs
5. What do we mean Sustainable?
• Deliverable/benefit lasts indefinitely; for a lifetime
– TRF Definition: Sustainability is the capacity for
maintaining outcomes long‐term to serve the ongoing
need of a community after grant funds have been
expended.
• Essential elements of sustainability:
–
–
–
–
technical solution, issues
social & cultural factors
financial & business-like elements
empowerment & community self-sufficiency
• some examples …
Needs  Assist  Sustainability
Slow, Reduce:
• “1 of” Projects
• Donor-dependency
• Supply- or Grant-driven
Think, Identify & Use:
• Community Solutions
• Empowerment
• Use alternatives with
• Local materials, jobs,
manufacture, skills
• Vision & Path to Future
• Monitor, Measure
• Evaluate & Learn
6. Other Elements of Successful Project
• Appeals to Hearts & Head (greatly improves human
condition)
• Reliable long-term partner (reputation, checklist)
• Community & members volunteerism,
commitment
• Meets Area of Focus, Terms & Conditions
• Fiscally sound, with stewardship process
• Optimizes use of $$ (aka “bang for buck”)
6. Other Elements of Success (cont’d)
•
•
•
•
Measurable Outcome – Evaluate it
Repeatable, Growable, Generalizeable
Adopt-a-village, -area, -watershed, -country
Add-in features (WaSH > stoves; School >
literacy, compost>crops, microlending>enterprise)
– follow community lead on needs, priorities
• Plan to visit, to share, to promote ... to
celebrate ... and repeat. Be infectious!
7. Resources:
• RI Communities In Action booklet 605a & RI
Community Assessment Tools 605c
• Rotary.org – Future Vision materials, training
– FV Resources page http://bit.ly/Il8sgP
• Vocation Training Teams (VTT) can support
International & Vocational service
• TRF Performance Enhancement Program
– Wasrag  other RAGs and Areas of Focus
8. Have Fun!
It’s not only the end product of the
project, and all the good it may do …
 Also about the process and
friendships you build along the way.
 Collaborate - do more than you
could ever do on your own!

Thank You!
Ron Kelemen
[email protected]
www.D5100WCS.ORG
Stew Martin
[email protected]

similar documents