March 28 webinar: edTPA - cIcu | Commission on Independent

Report
edTPA: One College’s Journey
MARCH 28, 2014
EVE DIERINGER, ED.D .
Background
August 31, 2012 memo
“…strengthen the assessments for the
certification of teachers and school
leaders, by creation of a teacher
performance assessment…”
Background
Fall 2012 NYSATE and NYACTE
Conference, Albany, NY

Commissioner King

Panel Presentation
“How can field and course work be
integrated?”
The journey begins
 November 2012
Division Meeting
 February 2013
Local Evaluation Training
 March 2013
Introduction to Students
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors April 2013
What is edTPA?
 The Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) is a
student centered multiple measure assessment of
teaching.
 It is designed to be educative and predictive of effective
teaching and student learning.
The journey continues
Copyright © 2012 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved. edTPA handbooks are authored by
the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE) with editorial and design assistance from Pearson.
Rubric Blueprint
Copyright © 2012 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved. edTPA handbooks are authored by the
Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE) with editorial and design assistance from Pearson.
Rubric Progression
Copyright © 2012 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved. edTPA handbooks are authored by
the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE) with editorial and design assistance from Pearson.
Elementary edTPA Tasks Overview
What to Do
What to submit
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 1: Literacy Planning: Planning for Literacy Instruction and Assessment
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Select one class as a focus
Provide relevant context information.
Identify a learning segment to plan, teach, and analyze.
Select a learning segment of 3–5 lessons
Identify a central focus. The central focus should
support students to develop an essential strategy for
comprehending or composing text and requisite skills
that directly support that strategy.
Write and submit a lesson plan for each lesson in the
learning segment.
Select and submit key instructional materials
Respond to commentary prompts prior to teaching the
learning segment.
Choose one language function. Identify a learning task
where students use that language function. Identify the
language that students will be expected to use to
engage in the learning task and your instructional
supports.
Submit copies or directions for all planned assessments
from the learning segment.
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Part A: Literacy Context for
Learning Information
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Part B: Lesson Plans for
Learning Segment
Literacy Planning Rubrics
 Rubric 1: Planning for Literacy
Learning
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Part C: Instructional Materials
Rubric 2: Planning to Support
Varied Student Learning
Needs
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Part D: Literacy Assessments 
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Part E: Planning Commentary
Rubric 3: Using Knowledge of
Students to Inform Teaching
and Learning
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Rubric 4: Identifying and
Supporting Language
Demands
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Rubric 5: Planning
Assessments to Monitor and
Support Student Learning
Elementary edTPA
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 1: Literacy Planning: Planning for Literacy Instruction and Assessment
Literacy Planning Rubrics
 Rubric 1: Planning for Literacy Learning
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ literacy skills and an essential strategy for
comprehending or composing text?
 Rubric 2: Planning to Support Varied Student Learning Needs
How does the candidate use knowledge of his/her students to target support for students’
literacy learning?
 Rubric 3: Using Knowledge of Students to Inform Teaching and Learning
How does the candidate use knowledge of his/her students to justify instructional plans?
 Rubric 4: Identifying and Supporting Language Demands
How does the candidate identify and support language demands associated with a key
literacy learning task?
 Rubric 5: Planning Assessments to Monitor and Support Student Learning
How are the formal and informal assessments selected or designed to monitor students’
use of the essential strategy and requisite skills to comprehend or compose text?
What to Do
Elementary edTPA Tasks Overview
What to submit
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 2: Literacy Instruction: Instructing and Engaging Students in Literacy Learning
Obtain required permissions for
video recording from
parents/guardians of your students
and other adults appearing in the
video.
Identify lessons to video record.
You should be interacting with
students to support them to
independently apply the literacy
strategy to comprehend or compose
text.
Video record your teaching and
select 1 or 2 video clips (no more
than 15 minutes total).
Analyze your teaching and your
students’ learning in the video
clip(s) by responding to commentary
prompts.
 Part A: Video Clips
Instruction Rubrics
 Rubric 6: Learning Environment
 Part B: Instruction Commentary
Rubric 7: Engaging Students in
Learning
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Rubric 8: Deepening Student
Learning
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Rubric 9: Subject-Specific
Pedagogy: Elementary Literacy
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Rubric 10: Analyzing Teaching
Effectiveness
Elementary edTPA Tasks Overview
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 2: Literacy Instruction: Instructing and Engaging Students in Literacy Learning
Instruction Rubrics
 Rubric 6: Learning Environment
How does the candidate demonstrate a positive literacy learning environment that
support students’ engagement in learning?
 Rubric 7: Engaging Students in Learning
How does the candidate actively engage students in integrating strategies and skills
to comprehend or compose text?
 Rubric 8: Deepening Student Learning
How does the candidate elicit student response to promote thinking and develop
literacy skills and the essential strategy to comprehend and/or compose text?
 Rubric 9: Subject-Specific Pedagogy: Elementary Literacy
How does the candidate support students to apply the essential literacy strategy?
 Rubric 10: Analyzing Teaching Effectiveness
How does the candidate use evidence to evaluate and change teaching practice to
meet students’ varied learning needs?
Elementary edTPA Tasks Overview
What to Do
What to submit
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 3: Literacy Assessment: Assessing Students’ Literacy Learning
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Select one assessment from the learning
segment that you will use to evaluate your
students’ developing knowledge and skills.
Submit the assessment used to evaluate student
performance.
Define and submit the evaluation criteria you
will use to analyze student learning.
Collect and analyze student work to identify
quantitative and qualitative patterns of learning
within and across learners in the class.
Select 3 work samples to illustrate your analysis
that represent the patterns of learning. At least
one of the students must be a student with
specific learning needs.
Summarize the learning of the whole class, and
refer to work samples from three focus students
to illustrate patterns in student understanding
across the class.
Submit feedback on the assessment for the 3
students in written, audio, or video form.
Analyze evidence of students’ language use from
(1) the video clip(s) from the instruction task,
AND/OR (2) the student work samples from the
literacy assessment task.
Analyze your assessment of student learning and
plan for next steps by responding to
commentary prompts.
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Part A: Student Literacy Work
Samples
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Part B: Evidence of Feedback
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Assessment Rubrics
 Rubric 11: Analysis of Student
Learning
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Rubric 12: Providing Feedback to
Guide Further Learning
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Rubric 13: Student Use of
Feedback
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Rubric 14: Analyzing Students’
Language Use and Literacy
Learning
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Rubric 15: Using Assessment to
Inform Instruction
Part C: Literacy Assessment
Commentary
Part D: Evaluation Criteria
Elementary edTPA Tasks Overview
Evaluation Rubrics
Task 3: Literacy Assessment: Assessing Students’ Literacy Learning
Assessment Rubrics
 Rubric 11: Analysis of Student Learning
How does the candidate analyze evidence of student learning
 Rubric 12: Providing Feedback to Guide Further Learning
What type of feedback does the candidate provide to focus students?
 Rubric 13: Student Use of Feedback
How does the candidate provide opportunities for focus students to use
the feedback to guide their further learning?
 Rubric 14: Analyzing Students’ Language Use and Literacy Learning
How does the candidate analyze students’ use of language to develop
content understanding?
 Rubric 15: Using Assessment to Inform Instruction
How does the candidate use the analysis of what students know and are
able to do to plan next steps in instruction?
One professor’s thinking
Course Description:
This course also helps to prepare teacher candidates
for the edTPA Secondary English Language Arts
Assessment by analyzing and applying the three tasks:
(1) Planning for Instruction and Assessment,
(2) Instructing and Engaging Students in
Learning, and
(3) Assessing Student Learning.
One professor’s thinking
 Create effective English Language Arts lesson plans
and a Unit Plan (with 5 consecutive EnglishLanguage Arts lessons) that meet the
requirements of the edTPA Secondary
Language Arts Assessment criteria.
 Write practice responses to the three tasks required
for teacher candidates on the edTPA Secondary
Language Arts and use the specialized
terminology found within this assessment.
 Create various informal and formal assessments to
evaluate students’ deep understanding and
individual and group learning patterns.
One professor’s thinking
Course Content
What is the edTPA Secondary English Language Arts
Assessment?
 What are the requirements of Task 1?
 What are the requirements of Task 2?
 What are the requirements of Task 3?
 How can the rubrics be helpful guides for teacher candidates?
 What are the special terms that you need to know and include in this
edTPA Secondary ELA Assessment?
Another small step
April 18, 2013
Core group meeting


Need for districts, cooperating
teachers to understand
requirements
Need to revise lesson plan and
course outlines
Course Outline
METHODS AND TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING
MATHEMATICS FOR ADOLESCENT STUDENTS
 Each student will write 3 consecutive lesson plans using the
Molloy Lesson Plan Format on one topic in Math 7, 8, or
Integrated Algebra (level will be selected in class).
 One lesson will be presented in class (20 minutes maximum).
 The lesson will be video-taped for use in the edTPA write-up for
Tasks 1, 2, and 3.
 These will be scored using the rubrics found in the edTPA
Handbook.
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors May 2013
 Finalize outlines for seminars
 Review local evaluation samples
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors May 2013
Seminars
Session 1
Introduction to Course Outline and Course Requirements
Session 2
Introduction to edTPA Handbook:
Session 3
Review Common Core Standards and the Academic Language in
Glossary
Sessions 4, 5, 6
Introduction to TASK 1: PLANNING FOR INSTRUCTION AND
ASSESSMENT
Sessions 7, 8
Introduction to TASK 2: INSTRUCTING AND ENGAGING STUDENTS
Session 8
Introduction to Task 3: ASSESSING STUDENT LEARNING
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors May 2013
“Confidential Information (samples and/or video)
provided by SCALE may be used for such trainings
and must be distributed only to faculty or P-12
partners under secure conditions in face-to-face
meetings and never posted on publically available,
non-secure websites or platforms (without
password protection).”
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors May 2013
 How do the candidate’s plans build students’ literacy skills and an essential strategy for
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comprehending or composing text?
Elementary Literacy
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ abilities to comprehend,
construct meaning from, interpret, and/or respond to complex text?
Secondary ELA
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ conceptual understanding, procedural
fluency, AND mathematical reasoning and/or problem solving skills? Elementary
Mathematics
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ conceptual understanding, procedural
fluency, AND mathematical reasoning and/or problem solving skills? Secondary
Mathematics
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ abilities to use science concepts and scientific
practices during inquiry to explain a real-world phenomenon? Secondary Science
How do the candidate’s plans build knowledge and skills aligned to individualized
education plan goals and benchmarks? Special Education
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors May 2013
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors May 2013
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors May 2013
There are language demands that teachers need
to consider as they plan to support student
learning of content, which include:
 Language
Functions
 Vocabulary
 Syntax
 Discourse
Enlisted faculty and field supervisors
Elementary
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Literacy
Mathematics
Secondary ELA
Secondary Mathematics
Secondary HSS
Secondary Science
English as an Additional Language
Special Education
Faculty and Field Supervisor Collaboration
Summer 2013
Their work showed little ability to expand upon ideas or to
grasp the reader’s attention. In order to achieve proficiency of
the concept of effective use of adjectives in writing, this
learning segment will offer scaffolded instruction within the
gradual release of responsibility model (Gambrell et. al.,
2007). All skills will be modeled by the teacher. Then
students will be given the opportunity to rehearse through
guided practice. Finally, support will be withdrawn as the
students will take the responsibility to utilize the skills by
identifying and producing adjectives and by utilizing them
within the context of writing.
Course Revision
August 2013
Engaging Students in Learning
Refer to examples from the video clip in your
responses to the prompts.
a. Explain how your instruction engaged students in
developing an understanding of science and requisite
skills.
b. Describe how your instruction linked students’ prior
academic learning or knowledge with new learning.
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors May 2013
STRATEGIES (Learning Strategies*)
Strategies are the instructional approaches used during
the lesson.
Strategies should include edTPA language/
communication subcategories.
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
Planning
• Instructional and
social context
• Lesson plans and
Instructional
materials, student
assessments
Instruction
Assessment
• Video Clips
• Analysis of whole
class assessment
• Instruction
Commentary
• Analysis of learning
and feedback to
THREE students
• Assessment
Commentary
• Planning
Commentary
Analysis of Teaching Effectiveness
Academic Language Development
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
Supporting Literacy Development Through Language
Language Demand: Language Function. Identify one language
function essential for students to learn the literacy strategy
within your central focus.
Analyze
Argue
Categorize
Compare/
contrast
Describe
Interpret
Predict
Question
Retell
Summarize
Explain
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
Supporting History/Social Studies Development Through
Language
Language Function. Identify one language function essential for
students to learn the history/social studies content within
your central focus. Listed below are some sample language
functions. You may choose one of these or another more
appropriate for your learning segment.
Analyze
Compare/
contrast
Construct
Describe
Evaluate
Examine
Identify
Interpret
Justify
Locate
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
Supporting Mathematics Development Through Language
Language Function. Identify one language function essential
for students to learn the mathematics within your central
focus. Listed below are some sample language functions. You
may choose one of these or another more appropriate for
your learning segment.
Compare/
contrast
Conjecture
Describe
Explain
Prove
Identify a key learning task from your plans that provides
students with opportunities to practice using the language
function identified above.
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
Artifacts
• Analysis of whole class
assessment
Rubrics
11. Analysis of Student Learning
12. Using Feedback to Guide Further
Learning
• Analysis of learning and
feedback to THREE
13. Student Use of Feedback
students
14. Analyzing Students’ Language Use
• Assessment
Commentary
15. Using Assessment to Inform Instruction
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
Rubric 11
How does the candidate analyze evidence of student learning?
Rubric 12
What type of feedback does the candidate provide to focus
students?
Rubric 13
How does the candidate provide opportunities for focus students to
use the feedback to guide their further learning?
Rubric 14
How dos the candidate analyze students’ use of language to develop
content understanding?
Rubric 15
How does the candidate use the analysis of what students know and
are able to do to plan next steps in instruction?
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
 Where to find the evidence:
•
•
•
Rubric 11: Commentary prompt 1, evaluative criteria, work samples
Rubric 12 : Commentary prompt 2a, work samples
Rubric 13 : Commentary prompt 2b
 Materials to use:
•
•
Candidate sample (do not look at scores)
Evaluation Rubric document
 What are you looking for?
•
•
•
See “look fors”
Highlight, note evidence linked to rubric language
Determine where most of the evidence falls—emerging, proficient or
advanced
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
Artifacts
• Video Clips
Rubrics
6. Learning Environment
7. Engaging Students in Learning
• Commentary
8. Deepening Student Learning
9. Subject Specific Pedagogy
10. Analyzing Teaching Effectiveness
edTPA Workshop
Faculty and Field Supervisors October 2013
History/SS Rubric 6: Learning Environment
Evidence: Video clips, Instruction commentary prompt 2
Students openly share responses during debate and respond to candidate
questions without hesitation.
Candidate affirms responses, “excellent” or “great.”
Students ask for help when working independently.
Mutual respect among students less clear as little to no evidence of student to
student interaction
Score: Proficient
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors December 2013
Secondary ELA, Math, Science
History/Social Studies,
K-12 Visual Arts
Elementary, World Language,
K-12 Performing Arts
Submit
Receive Score
Submit
Receive Score
March 6
submit
March 27
March 13
submit
April 10
March 20
April 10
March 27
April 24
April 3
April 24
April 10
May 8
April 17
re-submit
May 8
April 24
re-submit
May 22
May 1
May 22
May 8
June 5
May 15
June 5
Seminar 1
Introduction to Course and edTPA
Requirements
 Deadlines for edTPA:
March 6/March 13
 Schedule first observation/video clip
 Review CCSS, Academic Language (glossary),
Making Good Choices
Seminar 2
Introduction to Task 1
Planning for Instruction and Assessment:
 Begin to plan for learning segment (3-5 lesson plans
using Table of Contents planning sheet)
 Review Professional Responsibilities and Artifacts and
Commentary Specifications for edTPA handbooks
 Re-read Rubrics 1-5 highlighting key words
 HW: Complete Context for Learning Information and
Task 1 Commentary
Seminar 3
February 3, 5
Seminar 3 - Introduction to Task 2
Instructing and Engaging Students:
 Begin to plan video clip(s)
 Re-read Rubrics 6-10 highlighting key words
 HW: Completed Task 2 Commentary to be
handed in to instructor February 10, 12
 No classes week of February 17 due to Winter Recess
Seminar 4
February 10, 12
Seminar 4 - Introduction to Task 3
Assessing Students’ Learning:
 Begin to analyze student written work from
assessment(s)
 Read and discuss directions for Task 3 on pp. 2527.
 Re-read Rubrics 11-15
 HW: Completed Task 3 to be handed in to
instructor on February 24, 26
Seminar 5
February 24, 26
Seminar 5 – Individual conferences on all tasks in
preparation for submission on March 6 and March 13
 Scores received on March 27/April 10
 If students need to re-submit a new set of lesson
plans and commentaries (due to unacceptable scores
on first submission), then supervisors offer individual
support.
 Students need to re-submit by April 17/April 24
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors December 2013
edTPA Minimum Cut Scores
FIELD
TOTAL SCORE
AVERAGE
RUBRIC
SCORE
Elementary
Evaluation
49
2.73
All other handbook
areas
41
2.73
World Languages
35
2.73
Rubric 1: Planning for Mathematical Understandings
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ conceptual understanding,
procedural fluency, AND mathematical reasoning and/or problem solving
skills?
 Level 3 Plans for instruction build on each other to
support learning of facts and procedures with clear
connections to concepts AND mathematical reasoning
and/or problem solving skills.
 Level 4 Plans for instruction build on each other to
support learning of facts and procedures with clear
and consistent connections to concepts AND
mathematical reasoning and/or problem solving skills.
 Level 5 (Level 4 plus) Candidate explains how s/he
will use learning tasks and materials to lead students
to make clear and consistent connections.
Rubric 1: Planning for English-Language Arts Understandings
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ abilities to comprehend,
construct meaning from, interpret, and/or respond to complex text?
 Level 3 Plans for instruction build on each other to
support learning of meanings of complex text with
clear connections to interpretive skills or responses to
the text, supported by textual references.
 Level 4 Plans for instruction build on each other to
support learning of meanings of complex text with
clear and consistent connections to interpretive skills
or responses to the text, supported by textual
references.
 Level 4 plus Candidate explains how s/he will use
learning tasks and materials to lead students to make
clear and consistent connections.
Rubric 1: Planning for Scientific Understandings
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ abilities to use science concepts
and scientific practices during inquiry to explain a real-world phenomenon?
 Level 3 Plans for instruction build on each other to
support students learning of science concepts, to
investigate a phenomenon and to generate
explanations through engagement in scientific
practices through inquiry.
 Level 4 Plans for instruction build on each other to
support students learning of science concepts, to
investigate a phenomenon, and to generate evidencebased arguments.
 Level 5 Plans for instruction build on each other to
support students learning of science concepts, to
investigate a phenomenon, and to generate and
evaluate evidence-based arguments.
“Secret language”
“School is where you go to learn a secret language but
they don’t tell you that it’s there. You have to figure it
out on your own. It’s like an initiation to a secret club.”
~ Maya, 8th grade.
Academic Language IS
 A register of English used for specific purposes
 Used in both writing and speaking, but different
from social conversation
 Much broader than a focus on “correct” usage
Academic language is NOT
 JUST specialized vocabulary
 JUST words
 JUST linguistic forms without meaning
or purpose
 JUST written language
 JUST formal language
 JUST the use of standard (“correct”)
forms
What makes language sound academic?
Everyday language
 Shorter and incomplete
sentences
 Actions through verbs (cut
down trees)
 More active voice (How
much pizza did they eat?)
 Shorter noun phrases
(healthy food…)
Academic Language
 Longer and more complex
sentences
 Make actions into nouns to
build concepts
(deforestation)
 Passive voice more
common (How much pizza
was eaten?)
 Long noun phrases
(Improving the nutritional
quality of foods offered
from other sources…)
Translating between academic and everyday
language
Teaching technique:
As you teach, stop and engage students in
translating between academic language
and everyday language. Help them to see
different ways of saying the same thing
and different purposes for saying things
differently.
http://www.engageny.org/resource/close-reading-strategies-with-informational-text-by-expeditionary-learning
Vocabulary
 Content-specific words
(i.e. trapezoid)
 General academic words
(i.e. furthermore, feature)
 Common, everyday words that are used in
specialized ways in subjects
(i.e. table, right, state)
A few different language features (syntax)
Everyday language
Academic Language
 Shorter and incomplete
 Longer and complex
sentences (Sausage biscuits
again?)
 Actions through verbs (cut
down trees)
 More active voice (They ate
pizza)
 Shorter noun phrases
(healthy food)
sentences (Experts say
that…….)
 Make actions into nouns to
build concepts
(deforestation)
 Passive voice more
common (how much pizza
was eaten?)
 Long noun phrases
(Improving the nutritional
quality of foods offered
from other sources)
Examples of syntax: elaborate noun phrases
 ...added moisture evaporated from the sea surface
then powers the seedling tropical storm like a giant
heat engine
 Write an inequality that, when solved, will give the
amount of sales Mandy needs to cover her planned
expenses.
Discourse
 Discourse includes the structures of written and oral
language, as well as how members of the discipline
talk, write, and participate in knowledge construction.
 Discipline-specific discourse has distinctive features or
ways of structuring oral or written language (text
structures) that provide useful ways for the content to
be communicated.
edTPA Workshop
Students
 January 15
 January 16
 January 17
 Mandatory
 8:00
a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
edTPA Workshop
Students January 15, 2014
What edTPA vocabulary terms do I need to
know before completing this assessment?
1. See edTPA Glossary in your edTPA Handbook
2. *See hand-out 1, Simplified Explanations of
Academic Language and edTPA Glossary Terms
edTPA Workshop
Students January 15, 2014
Planning for Alignment and Learning
 How do I select the central focus, student content
standards, and learning objectives?
 What is my subject area emphasis?
 How do I select a learning segment?
 What should I include in my lesson plans?
 What if I have particular lessons that I am required to
teach in a prescribed way? What if my school or grade level
has a standard curriculum?
edTPA Workshop
Students January 15, 2014
Language Demands

How do I identify the language
demands of a learning task?
Workshop within the Workshop
Students January 16, 2014
 Video Recording Guidelines
 Video Recording Suggestions
 Software and Equipment
Considerations
 Video Equipment Tutorials
Windows Movie Maker:
http://windowns.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/Getting-started-with-WindowsMovie-Maker
iMovie:
http://desktopvideo.about.com/od/imoviefideotutorials/
Workshop within the Workshop
Students January 16, 2014
 How do I select a learning segment?
 Video Recording Key Decisions
 Maintaining Confidentiality
 Features of a Quality edTPA Video
 How to Prepare the edTPA Video
http://www.teachingchanel.org/videos/videotaping-tips-for-teachers
edTPA Workshop
Students January 17, 2014
Analyzing Student Learning
 What kind of student work should I analyze
for my edTPA?
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
Task 1 – Planning
 Part A Context for Learning Information - no more than 3
pages
 Part B Lesson Plans for Learning Segment -no more than 4
pages per lesson; submit 3-5 lesson plans
 Part C Instructional Materials-no more than 5 pages of KEY
instructional materials per lesson plan
 Part D. Assessments -submit assessments in 1 file; within the
file, label assessments by corresponding lesson (Lesson 1
Assessment, etc.); order assessments as they are used in the
learning segment
 Part E. Planning Commentary no more than 9 pages,
including prompts
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
Video & Commentary Task 2 Instruction
 Part A. Video Clips (2) - no more than 10 minutes total
running time for each; or 1-2 videos totaling 15 minutes
(subject dependent)
Before recording video, obtain permission from
parents/guardians of your students and from adults who
appear in the video; when naming each clip file, include the
number of the lesson shown in the video clip.
 Part B. Instruction Commentary - no more than 6 pages of
commentary, including prompts
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
Task 3 - Assessment
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Part A. Student Work Samples (Part A. Student Work Samples (use correction fluid, or a marker to
mask/remove students’ name, your name, and school name before copying/scanning any work
samples; on each work sample indicate the student number and refer to them accordingly in the
Assessment Commentary; when naming each work sample file, include the student number; if
students’ writing is illegible, write a transcription directly on the work sample.
Part B. Evidence of Feedback (document the location of your evidence of feedback in the Assessment
Commentary; if feedback is not written on the student work samples or recorded on the video clips,
submit only 1 file for each student, document, video file, OR audio file and indicate the student
number (Student 1 Feedback, etc.) in the corresponding feedback; when naming each feedback file,
include the student number; if you submit feedback as a video or audio clip and comments cannot be
clearly heard, attach transcriptions of your comments (no more than 2 pages) to the end of the
Assessment Commentary).
For Academic Language-If you choose to submit a video clip of student language use, it should be no
more than 5 minutes, with a time stamp reference for the evidence of language use described in the
Assessment Commentary.
Part C. Assessment Commentary - no more than 8 pages of commentary, including prompts; no more
than 5 pages for the chosen assessment; if necessary no more than 2 pages of feedback transcriptions;
important: insert a copy of the chosen assessment, including directions/prompts provided by students.
Part D. Evaluation Criteria (Indicate the lesson number on the corresponding evaluation criteria:
Lesson 1 Evaluation Criteria, Lesson 2 Evaluation Criteria, etc.)
Elementary Literacy Assessment
Rubric 1: Planning for Literacy Learning
How do the candidate’s plans build students’ literacy skills and an essential strategy for
comprehending or composing text?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Candidate’s plans
focus solely on
literacy skills
without connections
to any strategy for
comprehending or
composing text.
There are significant
content inaccuracies
that will lead to
student
misunderstandings.
Plans for instruction
support student
learning of skills
with vague
connections to
strategies for
comprehending or
composing text.
Plans for instruction
build on each other
to support learning
of skills with clear
connections to the
essential literacy
strategy for
comprehending or
composing text.
Plans for instruction
build on each other
to create a
meaningful context
that supports
learning of skills
with clear and
consistent
connections to the
essential literacy
strategy for
comprehending or
composing text.
Level 4 plus: Plans
build an authentic
connection between
reading and writing.
OR
Standards,
objectives, and
learning tasks and
materials are not
aligned with each
other.
Candidate explains
how s/he will use
learning tasks and
materials to lead
students to
independently apply
the essential
strategy and
identified skills.
Secondary History/Social Studies Assessment
Rubric 3: Using Knowledge of Students to Inform Teaching and Learning
How does the candidate use knowledge of his/her students to justify instructional
plans?
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Candidate’s
justification of
learning tasks is
either missing OR
represents a deficit
view of students and
their backgrounds.
Candidate justifies
learning tasks with
limited attention to
students’ prior
academic learning
OR
personal/cultural/co
mmunity assets.
Candidate justifies
why learning tasks
(or their
adaptations) are
appropriate using -examples of
students’ prior
academic learning
OR
examples of
personal/cultural/
community assets
Candidate justifies
why learning tasks
(or their
adaptations) are
appropriate using
Level 4 plus:
Candidate’s
justification is
supported by
principles from
research and/or
theory.
Candidate makes
superficial
connections to
research and/or
theory.
examples of
students’ prior
academic learning
examples of
personal/cultural/
community assets
Candidate makes
connections to
research and/or
theory.
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
Resources and tips to help Field Supervisors assist students with
edTPA:
1 Deadlines to submit edTPA:
 Secondary- March 6
 Elementary- March 13
2 Be aware of timelines. Students will be taping either the week immediately before or the week
immediately after February vacation (February 17-21)
3 All submissions will be made via Chalk & Wire
4 Names may not appear on any documents (this includes student’s name, cooperating teacher’s name,
names of schools, names of students, Molloy College)
5 Refer to each subject -specific handbook (on website)
6 Refer to Making Good Choices (on website)
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
7 How can you help your students?
 You should encourage students to tape early on and frequently to make sure visual and








audio is clear!
You should read your students’ submissions.
You may not edit for grammar or content.
You should refer to the rubrics (subject specific and incorporated into each subject specific
handbook).
You should have students refer to any graphic organizers received in the 3-day workshop.
You should ask questions based on submissions such as: Look at Rubric 10 for a score of 4.
Did you include all of that? [Candidate proposes changes that address individual and
collective learning needs related to the central focus. Candidate makes connections to
research and/or theory.]
You should emphasize the need to work with a buddy, to refer to the rubrics and to be
critical!
You should encourage the use of theorists, theories and how they guide students’ teaching.
You should ask students to include in task 3 what the child did well and what he/she
needs to do to improve this specific submitted assessment.
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
TO BEGIN
I have…
 Identified in what grade level (and subject area) I will be completing the
edTP
 Registered at edTPA.com and written down my Authorization Key and
Submission Deadline:
 Once registered, you can access your authorization key at edtpa.com.
You will need to log in using your original email and password. Click
“current registrations” and “manage edTPA portfolio.” Click “edTPA
Platform Provider.” Acknowledge and confirm. Then you will see your
authorization key. It should also be emailed to you.
 Authorization Key: ___________________________
 Submission Deadline: ___________________________
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
TO BEGIN
I have…
 Identified in what grade level (and subject area) I will be completing
the edTPA
 Registered at edTPA.com and written down my Authorization Key and
Submission Deadline:
 Once registered, you can access your authorization key at edtpa.com.
You will need to log in using your original email and password. Click
“current registrations” and “manage edTPA portfolio.” Click “edTPA
Platform Provider.” Acknowledge and confirm. Then you will see your
authorization key. It should also be emailed to you.
 Authorization Key: ___________________________
 Submission Deadline: ___________________________
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
TASK 1
 Used my Cooperating Teacher as an aide in choosing one class as a




focus
Used my Cooperating Teacher as an aide in identifying any
students with accommodations, modifications, and/or permanent
IEP’s within the chosen class
Used my Cooperating Teacher as an aide in completing Part A in
the first week of my student teaching placement
Made sure Part A is in the correct format: 1 File, Arial 11pt. font,
single space, 1” margins, no more than 3 pages including
prompts (.doc; .docx; .odt; .pdf)
Spoken with my Cooperating Teacher and decided what learning
segment I will be plan, teach, and analyze (3-5 consecutive
lessons)
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
TASK 2
 Identified a recording device I would like to use
(FLIP video, iPhone, camera, etc.) and found a clear
spot in the classroom to set up the device.
 Obtained permission from the parents/guardians of
the students, and from the adults who will appear in
the video(s). (I determine whether I will film the
whole class, or a targeted group.)
edTPA Workshop
Field Supervisors January 2014
TASK 3
 Identified the location of my evidence of
feedback (Part A if written on the student work
samples; Part B if audio/ video)
 Provided feedback on what the student did well
and what s/he needs to do to improve this
assessment and future assessments
 Responded to the prompts in Part C
Additional Student Support
 February-March
Beginning mid February
4:30 - 6:30 p.m.
 February break
Two sessions, four hours
Last Minutes Reminders
edTPA: What to Submit
Format your response in Arial 11 pt single spaced text with 1” page
margins.
Task 1: Planning for Instruction and Assessment
 Part A: Context for Learning Information - no more than 3 pages
 Part B: Lesson Plans for Learning Segment - no more than 4 pages
per lesson; submit 3-5 lesson plans
 Part C: Instructional Materials - Materials-no more than 5 pages of
KEY instructional materials per lesson plan
 Part D: Assessments - submit assessments in 1 file; within the file,
label assessments by corresponding lesson (Lesson 1 Assessment,
etc.); order assessments as they are used in the learning segment
 Part E: Planning Commentary - no more than 9 pages, including
prompts
Last Minutes Reminders
edTPA: What to Submit
Task 2: Instructing and Engaging Students in Learning
Part A: Video Clips – 2 clips of no more than 10 minutes
each total running time for each; or 1-2 Videos
totaling 15 minutes. Make sure to read your subject
specific handbook! When naming each clip file,
include the number of the lesson shown in the video
clip
Part B: Instruction Commentary - no more than 6 pages
of commentary, including prompts
Last Minutes Reminders
edTPA: What to Submit
Task 3: Assessing Student Learning
Part A: Student Work Samples - Student Work Samples (Part A. Student Work Samples (use correction fluid,
or a marker to mask/remove students’ name, your name, and school name before copying/scanning any
work samples; on each work sample indicate the student number and refer to them accordingly in the
Assessment Commentary; when naming each work sample file, include the student number; if students’
writing is illegible, write a transcription directly on the work sample.
Part B: Evidence of Feedback -(document the location of your evidence of feedback in the Assessment
Commentary; if feedback is not written on the student work samples or recorded on the video clips, submit
only 1 file for each student, [document, video file, OR audio file] and indicate the student number (Student
1 Feedback, etc.) in the corresponding feedback; when naming each feedback file, include the student
number; if you submit feedback as a video or audio clip and comments cannot be clearly heard, attach
transcriptions of your comments (no more than 2 pages) to the end of the Assessment Commentary).
[ Assessment Commentary -If you choose to submit a video clip of student language use, it should be no
more than 5 minutes, with a time stamp reference for the evidence of language use described in the
Assessment Commentary.]
Part C: Assessment Commentary - no more than 10 pages of commentary, including prompts; no more than 5
pages for the chosen assessment; if necessary no more than 2 pages of feedback transcriptions; important:
insert a copy of the chosen assessment, including directions/prompts provided by students.
Part D: Evaluation Criteria -Evaluation Criteria (Indicate the lesson number on the corresponding evaluation
criteria)

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