One Child Practice Model Training for the Pilots

Report
One Child One Team One Plan
Practice Model
Training for the Pilots
The Pilots explained
The pilot sites
• Counties Galway and Mayo (32 schools, 7 SCP
projects, 22 HSCL Coordinators, 6 EWS staff)
• Clonmel (5 schools, HSCL, SCP and EWS staff)
• East Tallaght (5 schools, 1 SCP, 2 HSCL, 1 EWS)
• Darndale Dublin 17 (2 schools, 1 SCP, 2 HSCL 1
EWS)
• Killenaule (Tipperary) (1 school, HSCL, SCP,
EWS)
The pilot sites (Continued)
• Limerick (3 schools, HSCL, SCP, EWS)
• EWS trialing a referral based service throughout
the country
• 3 EWS pilots of One Child in Non DEIS areas
Management of the pilots
• CEO
• Pilot Project Steering Group
• SMT member overseeing each of the pilot sites
• Regular audit
• Evaluation
Purpose of the Pilots
To assess:
Whether it can be demonstrated that NEWB
service strands can work more effectively together
Whether it can be demonstrated that outcomes for
children and families have been enhanced, or
whether there is potential for so doing (given a
longer time frame to work in)
Whether the practice model can actually deliver on
each of its components using the proposed
processes and documentation
Audit of records
• Audits at weeks 4, 8 and 12 of the pilot period on
both targeted and intensive records and one
semi-structured interview with key HSCL, SCP,
EWS staff and at least one Principal in each of
the pilot sites
• The purpose of the audits is to discover whether
key participating staff are adhering to the
processes as set out in the One Child
operational guidance and to establish the extent
to which all aspects of the practice model are
being demonstrated through the recording of
assessments, interventions and outcomes
Purpose of the Evaluation
 To see if the practice model is showing early
signs of success or failure, which will determine
the need for further implementation, further
testing or re-design
 To establish if there are improved outcomes for
students (and families) through the
implementation of the One Child practice model
 To see if the processes adopted in the One Child
operational guidance are workable and impactful
and can be deemed to be best practice
One Child One Team One Plan
Practice Model
Module 1
Vision, Values and the principal aim of NEWB
NEWB: The Vision
The vision is to provide excellent services
through a “One Child” approach. This will enable
children to experience the NEWB strands (where
they work together) in a seamless and consistent
way (whoever is providing the service) so that they
can be helped to take full advantage from the
education system and, hopefully, reach their
potential.
NEWB Core Shared Values
We focus on children’s education
and through our services improve
their potential for learning and
well-being
We seek to develop
solutions by working in
partnership with parents,
children, young people
and families
We use evidence from
research and best practice
to develop our services
We put children
at the centre of
everything we do
We respond to need in
a considered and
proportionate manner
We have respect for children
and families, embracing fairness
and difference to promote equality
We work together towards
excellence and quality with
integrity and mutual respect
We aim to work in an
integrated way with
our educational
partners
We work in partnership
with other providers
which strengthens the
delivery of our services
We work with high performing teams
who, through good quality
leadership and management, are
focused on improved outcomes
for children
We support staff and
nurture their potential
The principal aim of NEWB
Maximising
Attendance Participation and Retention
QUIZ – Module 1
Question
1. NEWB has a vision to provide excellent services
2. The core shared values put parents at the centre of everything we do
3. NEWB’s principal aim is to maximise attendance
4. One of our key values is to work in partnership with parents and
children
5. Attendance has declined over the years
6. There has been an improvement in mathematics and reading levels for
students at all levels
7. There were less than 10,000 suspensions in the last year that records
were kept
8. Early school leavers has dropped since 2004
9. The number of male students staying in secondary school has stayed
roughly the same over the past 8 years
True False
QUIZ – Module 1
Question
1. NEWB has a vision to provide excellent services
True False
√
√
√
2. The core shared values put parents at the centre of everything we do
3. NEWB’s principal aim is to maximise attendance
4. One of our key values is to work in partnership with parents and
children
√
√
5. Attendance has declined over the years
6. There has been an improvement in mathematics and reading levels for
students at all levels
√
√
7. There were less than 10,000 suspensions in the last year that records
were kept
8. Early school leavers has dropped since 2004
9. The number of male students staying in secondary school has stayed
roughly the same over the past 8 years
√
√
One Child Practice Model
Module 2
The 9 key components of the practice model
Component 1
We put children
at the centre of
everything we do
Component 2
The Intervention continuum
One Child, One Team, One Plan: The Intervention Continuum
Attendance, Participation and Retention
Encourage – Support – Reward – Advise – Influence – Encourage – Support – Reward – Advise – Influence
Advocate – Contract – Pressure – Warn – Enforce
Intervene proportionately to move children to the left
Schools and the School Community
In all Schools
Educational Welfare Service
Home School Community Liaison
And additionally
in DEIS Schools
School Completion Programme
Component 3
A Referral/request for service
Component 4
The use of a problem-solving framework:
Understand – Plan – Do – Review
Component 5
The use of a 4 Dimensional model to understand
the needs of children and families for intensive
service provision
Component 6
The provision of support and interventions to meet
assessed need
Component 7
The use of an outcomes framework to assess the
success or otherwise of the support or
interventions provided
Component 8
Recording proportionate to the interventions
provided
Component 9
Lead Worker
All of these components make up
The One Child Practice Model
QUIZ – Module 2
Question
1. NEWB services are provided at 4 levels of intervention
2. A completed referral form is needed prior to an assessment for
intensive intervention
3. Only intensive interventions are subject to the problem solving
framework Understand – Plan – Do – Review
4. There is a 4 dimensional model for the assessment of needs
5. The outcomes framework will not be used for targeted interventions
6. Recording for targeted interventions will be much less involved than for
intensive interventions
7. A lead worker approach is compulsory when more than one service
strand is working with the same family
True False
QUIZ – Module 2
Question
True False
√
1. NEWB services are provided at 4 levels of intervention
2. A completed referral form is needed prior to an assessment for
intensive intervention
√
√
3. Only intensive interventions are subject to the problem solving
framework Understand – Plan – Do – Review
4. There is a 4 dimensional model for the assessment of needs
√
√
5. The outcomes framework will not be used for targeted interventions
6. Recording for targeted interventions will be much less involved than for
intensive interventions
7. A lead worker approach is compulsory when more than one service
strand is working with the same family
√
√
One Child Practice Model
Module 3
Support for SOME
The Operational Guidance
Who provides
Support for SOME?
Targeted Interventions
The term targeted intervention is used where NEWB
strand staff become involved with individually named
children and families where the presenting problem is
likely to be resolved with either a one off piece of work
which will help to solve the problems identified or time
limited focussed support.
Being on a ‘targeted list’ is the entry point for those
requiring targeted support or interventions. Once a
student joins the Targeted List and work begins with a
NEWB strand, he/she becomes the subject of a
Targeted Work Record, i.e. a summary of what
targeted interventions have been provided. .
For the One Child pilots
Targeted interventions
will focus only on those children
who reach the threshold for ‘major concerns’
How a student enters the
Targeted Work Record
1. Someone (most likely a member of school staff but could
be a parent or sometimes a student him/herself) has
identified that Student (S) has additional/unmet educational
welfare needs beyond the capacity of universal or
preventative interventions (Support for ALL) to resolve. The
concern here is ‘growing’
2. The person with the concern brings this, in the first
instance, to the attention of the designated EWO (or in
DEIS schools to HSCL and/or SCP coordinator) who will
open a Targeted Work Record
3. An early task is to summarise the difficulty on the first
sheet of the targeted work record. This can be done
either by the person with the concern or by the EWO (or
in DEIS schools by the HSCL or SCP Co-ordinator)
4. If the EWO (or in DEIS schools HSCL and/or SCP
coordinator) considers that this additional/unmet need is
the within the remit of the NEWB service strands then
s/he adds S’s name to the Targeted List for discussion at
the next APR ‘meeting’ (see below)
5. Where the information received is incomplete then the
relevant NEWB service strand will source whatever
information is required to assist them to reach as full as
possible a picture of the factors that give rise to the
identified difficulty/unmet need
6. If it is considered that the unmet need is within the remit of
the NEWB, a Unique Identifying Number (UIN) is created
made up of the school roll number + the initials of the name
+ date of birth. A Targeted Work Record (TWR) is begun for
that student
7. Where it is evident that a student’s need is wholly or partly
outside the remit of the NEWB, this will be noted on the
TWR and steps taken at school level to seek appropriate
avenues of assistance that might be more relevant.
The Understand – Plan – Do – Review
Cycle
Support for SOME
Understand
Identifying Needs
The threshold is reached for referral for a Meitheal
When the student/their family have needs (in addition to the
educational welfare needs) in the following categories and it is
clear that a multi-agency response is needed:
a. Housing, employment and finance
b. Parental health or mental health problems which impact
on the child’s development and well-being
c. Child’s health or mental health problems that have an
impact on their development and well-being issues
d. Substance misuse that impacts on the child’s health and
development
e. A child’s self care and independence
f. Risk taking behaviour
g. Children involved in anti-social behaviour, low level
offending
The threshold for referral due to Child
Welfare and Child Protection concerns
Making a referral for child welfare concerns is
recommended if other needs in addition to
educational welfare needs emerge where it is
clear that a social work/ multi-agency response is
needed.
The Plan
Getting the One Team in place
The Plan
Identifying planned outcomes
and
who does what when
The Plan
The potential for identifying a lead
worker
What is an outcome?
An outcome is a measurable
result from an action or
activity (intervention)
designed to bring about
some change
No
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
C 10
C 11
C 12
C 13
C 14
C 15
C 16
C 17
C 18
C 19
C 20
C 21
C 21
Outcomes for children
Improvement in punctuality (A)
Improvement in attendance (A)
Reduction in suspensions (A)
Preventing expulsions (A)
Improvement in readiness to learn (P)
Improvement in behaviour (P)
Reduction in bullying others (P)
Reduction in withdrawn and non-engaged behaviour (P)
Improvement in social interaction with peers/staff (P)
Improvement in self-esteem and emotional awareness (P)
Improvement in test scores and attainment levels (P)
Attendance at agreed clubs or groups (P)
Home Tuition being provided (P)
Access to and use of additional services e.g. alcohol/drugs services (P)
Successful transition from home to first school place (R)
Transfer from class to class successful (R)
Transfer from primary to post primary successful (R)
Mainstream education placement secured after alternative placement (R)
Child moved to alternative educational setting (R)
School place secured for a child who has none (R)
Sitting the Junior or Leaving Certificate exams (R)
Other
No
Outcomes for Parents
P1 Ensuring that child attends school punctually and regularly
(A)
P2 Responding to a monitoring letter in a positive way (A)
P3 Responding to a SAN in a positive way (A)
P4 Responding to a summons in a positive way (A)
P5 Trust developed which improves relationships between
home and school and greater engagement which impacts
positively on the child (P)
P6 Gaining increased knowledge and skills, by attendance at
courses and completion of same, receiving completion of
course certificates (P)
P7 Reaching targets or goals set, being accredited for attaining
levels of competence in Maths and English (and other
courses), by attending or participating in courses or groups
(P)
P8 Improvement in self-esteem and sense of role which
enables: friendships to flourish and improved engagement
with the school; greater involvement in and supporting their
child’s education and learning; dialogue around child’s
progress with teacher; monitoring child’s work; assisting with
child’s homework; attendance at P/T meetings (P)
P9 Reaching targets or goals set, being accredited for attaining
levels of competence in Maths and English (and other
courses), by attending or participating in courses or groups
(PDG)
P10 Being involved as a resource in the classroom supporting
literacy, numeracy and other curricula areas (PDG)
P11 Being involved in developing school policies: codes of
behaviour; attendance; anti-bullying and in curricula planning
(PDG)
P12 Offering parent to parent support (PDG)
Do
Implementing the plan
Review
rationale, preparation,
involvement of students and parents
Review
Decisions and monitoring outcomes,
Where the child
has no school place
QUIZ – Module 3
Question
1. Being provided with targeted interventions from NEWB service strands
is the same as being on a targeted list
2. If child welfare or child protection concerns become apparent a referral
should be made to social work services
3. Assessing needs for targeted interventions is a complicated process
4. Up to 5 outcomes can be chosen for children and up to 3 for parents
5. A Lead Worker is always chosen for targeted interventions
6. The Day to Day Record Sheet is used to record actions or events that
have occurred. By this means others in ‘the team’ can be up-dated
7. A Student’s progress should be measured by ‘distance travelled’ from
the baseline determined in the planning stage
True False
QUIZ – Module 3
Question
True False
√
1. Being provided with targeted interventions from NEWB service strands
is the same as being on a targeted list
2. If child welfare or child protection concerns become apparent a referral
should be made to social work services
√
√
3. Assessing needs for targeted interventions is a complicated process
4. Up to 5 outcomes can be chosen for children and up to 3 for parents
√
√
5. A Lead Worker is always chosen for targeted interventions
6. The Day to Day Record Sheet is used to record actions or events that
have occurred. By this means others in ‘the team’ can be up-dated
√
7. A Student’s progress should be measured by ‘distance travelled’ from
the baseline determined in the planning stage
√
One Child Practice Model
Module 4
Support for FEW
The Operational Guidance
It starts with a Referral
The
Understand – Plan – Do – Review
Cycle
Support for FEW
NEWB approach to providing support
Understand
(Stage 1)
Review
(Stage 4)
Child Focussed
Interventions
Do
(Stage 3)
Plan
(Stage 2)
Participation of students and Families
• Actively encourage and enable participation
• ‘Done with, not done to’
• Be as un-intrusive as possible, minimise the numbers of
people working directly with the child/family
• Treat the interview as a forum for change
• Learn what the recipient wants
• Focus on creating small changes
• Offer choices
• Avoid creating stigma
• Remember the role that is (could be) played by parents
who do not live with their children
• Respect children and their families as people worth
doing business with
• Recognise that cooperation and the provision of welfare
is possible even where enforcement is necessary
Participation activities will include:
• Provision of verbal information and written information
• Opportunities to express their views and have these recorded
• Being encouraged to participate in planning meetings and at
subsequent reviews
• Identification of strengths within families as well as areas where
further help may be needed
• Early identification of any special needs of the child or relevant
family members to enable any support needs to be addressed,
such as interpreting, advocacy etc.
• Careful selection of assessment tools, methods and
approaches that will aid participation
Understand
(Stage 1)
What is the presenting problem?
Questions to pose
What are the barriers to attendance?
What are the barriers to participation?
What are the risks to retention?
Who could
support the
Child?
Questions to pose
Is it do with the child himself?
Is it to do with the family?
Is it to do with the school?
What does the child
(and the family)
say about the problem
What is the analysis
of the problem and the
potential solution
What are the
child’s strengths?
Understanding: an Assessment
• Objective: bring together and analyse information to
understand the factors that prevent the child getting the
most from their education
• When: For all intensive interventions
• Presenting issue: is it to do with attendance/participation
and engagement or retention?
• Reasons for the presenting problem: has it to do with the
child him/herself, with the family/with the school?
• Recorded on Part C of NEWB Service Provision Record
Some guidance on assessment
Aids to understanding
• Explore areas around the immediate concern, look behind the
presenting issues
• From the emerging information, a hypothesis may develop
that starts to explain the barriers experienced by the child.
This should be checked out/verified with others
• If there are discrepancies in accounts given by different
people consider the reasons why it might be so
• In the analysis, draw on theories and research evidence, i.e.
on attachment, separation anxiety, the impact on young
people with caring responsibilities etc.
• The analysis of the information gathered requires an
evaluation to be made. The impact of the factors that have a
bearing on attendance, participation and retention should be
weighed up and initial conclusions reached
• In the overall conclusions identify the plan: what changes are
wanted, how change can happen and what actions need to be
taken
Assessment: Dimension 1
The child: The child’s views should always be sought.
Consideration should be given to the best setting for this to happen
i.e. school/home. Also, who should be present: parent, teacher,
advocate or, where appropriate, the child alone with parental
consent. These decisions will depend in part on the age/cognitive
ability of the child. The child’s view about what are the barriers to
attendance, participation or retention needs to be listened to
carefully to establish how those barriers may be overcome. The
approach should be one of non-blame, but at the same time
establishing what needs to happen to alter the presenting situation.
It should be noted that the reasons for non- attendance/participation
will be unique to the child being considered but will probably be able
to be categorised as: social, emotional, behavioural, motivational,
illness-related, fear or phobia, lack of role model and maybe others
as well. It is important to identify all the positive factors, resilience
and strengths also on which the plan will be able to build.
Assessment: Dimension 2
The child in the family: It is important to establish the pattern of
attendance/participation/retention of other siblings in the
household and the parents’ views on education and learning
generally and, more specifically, their views on the school
attendance/participation of the child in question.
Other elements when thinking about the family could include:
family functioning; the mental health or learning disability of the
parent(s), alcohol or substance use/misuse; domestic violence;
concerns about the safety/protection of the child; sick or disabled
siblings etc. and how such things impact upon the child’s
attendance/participation (if such information is available). It
might be that a specialist assessment will be needed
The consideration should also consider the capacity and
motivation of the parent(s) to follow through any agreed plan to
improve attendance.
Assessment: Dimension 3
The child in education: Information about this dimension will
mostly come from school staff but parents and the child may
also make a contribution. The information provided could cover:
educational attainment and ability; relationships with teachers,
other staff and peers; particular subject interests or talent;
specific learning challenges; out of school activities and hobbies.
It could also consider the impact of bullying (if any) on the child,
travel to school issues etc.
Establishing exactly what has been done by school staff to try to
maintain attendance by the child will inform the assessment,
specifically those methods which have been seen to bring some
results, should be highlighted.
Assessment: Dimension 4
The social context within which a child lives can play a major part
in his/her functioning at school. The assessment may identify
resources that can be tapped to promote and support education.
For the most vulnerable children and families the seemingly
intractable nature and severe level of difficulty faced means that
single agency responses are less likely to be effective. The
synergy of agencies working in partnership provides the foundation
to vigorously address the problems faced and achieve lasting
change.
It will be necessary to explore with a family what support they
received and any gaps. Some families will be unaware of full range
of services from other agencies and community organisations on
offer and will benefit from being guided as to how to access such
resources.
Referrals for Child Welfare or
Child Protection concerns
Guidance
Questions to pose
Is it practical support?
Is it social/emotional support?
Is it behavioural support?
Is it academic support?
Who will do what?
How will it be done?
When will it start?
List the
interventions
Plan
(Stage 2)
How will they
be monitored
Set the
Outcomes
which are to be
met
Agree
Lead worker
The Plan
Developing a cohesive, well co-ordinated and
structured plan can make a real difference to
students who are facing difficult and complex
situations in their personal, home and school life.
In some instances the plan will relate to a single
strand’s interventions, in others – all 3 strands
could be involved and in yet others there could be
several additional agencies providing support as
part of the plan.
The Plan
NEWB plans are tailor-made to fit the individual needs of each
Student.
The NEWB service strand member, who received the referral ad
undertaken the assessment, identifies (from the nature of the
difficulty) those in the local network, both inside school and
externally, necessary to resolve the problem.
These people make up the ‘One Team’; hand-picked to all work
together to address the difficulties by their combined, concerted
effort. The Plan should be devised with the contribution of the
Student and his/her parents as, without their involvement and/or
agreement, the plan is less likely to succeed. They become part of
the ‘One Team’.
It is recognised that one person from the team may play a greater
role because the nature of the problem steers that way or because
of others factors.
The Lead Worker
An explanation
Agreeing the Plan
The Plan can be developed at any forum where
this is appropriate, i.e. Care Team, APR ‘Meeting’
etc. They need to be suitable if the student and
his/her parents are to be included.
A NEWB Conference (NC) places the contribution
of the student and parents centrally and has
proved very beneficial and is the preferred means
of creating the Plan. They are scheduled and
facilitated by the NEWB.
To support the scheduling of NEWB Conferences
(NCs) a number of template letters should be
completed.
The Plan should be recorded on Part D
What is an outcome?
An outcome is a measurable
result from an action or
activity (intervention)
designed to bring about
some change
Outcomes and Activities: the difference
A child attending 6 sessions of a homework club is
taking part in an activity. If, however as a result of
the activity a child hands in homework on time to
an acceptable standard – this is an outcome. If
previously, homework was not done either at all or
to a very poor standard, the outcome can also
represent distance travelled from a baseline
Setting Outcomes
Outcomes are set during the planning stage of intensive
Interventions. They need to take account of what has been
stated in the referral and what has been revealed through the
assessment. Often, the choosing of one outcome from the
standard list will be sufficient but, if not, it is recommended that
no more than 5 outcomes are chosen. Because NEWB is trying
to standardise practice, it is recommended in the first instance,
that only those provided in the list are used. The list will be
reviewed as part of the on-going evaluation of the practice
model.
The outcomes to be achieved will almost always represent
distance to be travelled; “improvement in” or “reduction in” (i.e.
the target). It is expected therefore that a baseline
measurement is taken and the expected improvement or
reduction agreed with the student and/or parent as part of the
plan.
No
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
C 10
C 11
C 12
C 13
C 14
C 15
C 16
C 17
C 18
C 19
C 20
C 21
C 21
Outcomes for children
Improvement in punctuality (A)
Improvement in attendance (A)
Reduction in suspensions (A)
Preventing expulsions (A)
Improvement in readiness to learn (P)
Improvement in behaviour (P)
Reduction in bullying others (P)
Reduction in withdrawn and non-engaged behaviour (P)
Improvement in social interaction with peers/staff (P)
Improvement in self-esteem and emotional awareness (P)
Improvement in test scores and attainment levels (P)
Attendance at agreed clubs or groups (P)
Home Tuition being provided (P)
Access to and use of additional services e.g. alcohol/drugs services (P)
Successful transition from home to first school place (R)
Transfer from class to class successful (R)
Transfer from primary to post primary successful (R)
Mainstream education placement secured after alternative placement (R)
Child moved to alternative educational setting (R)
School place secured for a child who has none (R)
Sitting the Junior or Leaving Certificate exams (R)
Other
Outcomes for parents
No
P 1 Responding to 1-1 support/intervention in a
positive way (attendance improved)
P 2 Responding to a monitoring letter in a positive
way (attendance improved)
P 3 Responding to a SAN in a positive way
(attendance improved)
P 4 Responding to a summons in a positive way
(attendance improved)
In summary, the plan should define:









Is it practical support?
Is it social/emotional support?
Is it behavioral support?
Is it academic support?
Who will do what?
How will it be done?
When will it start?
How will it be monitored?
What are the intended outcomes?
The Plan for intervention is agreed and will
include:
 Overall objective of the plan for the
student/parent in question
 Target outcomes (5 maximum for student,
and 4 maximum for parents)
 Proposed interventions
 Those staff responsible for Interventions
 When interventions should start and be
reviewed
 Lead worker
Keeps all relevant
others informed
Lead worker
monitors progress
Records kept
Ensures
Input from
colleagues
Provide the interventions
agreed
Do
(Stage 3)
Some Examples of Intensive Interventions
Intervention
finished – back to
Universal/preventative
Review
(Stage 4)
Questions to be asked
Have the services agreed been
provided
Have the outcomes been met
Has the problem been resolved
Is there a need for further intervention
What action is needed
Who needs to be involved
When is the next review date
Lead worker
appointed
Interventions
agreed
Support provided
Further plan to
be drawn up
NEWB Review Conference (NRC)
Recording outcomes achieved
During every review the staff member
responsible is required to record distance
travelled in respect of the outcomes chosen at
the planning stage. Logging the success or
otherwise of the outcomes at review is done by
clicking one of three boxes in the drop down
selection: not achieved; partially achieved; fully
achieved.
Review of serious non attendance
• Reviews at 8, 16 and 24 weeks
• If open at 24 weeks:
– Close the case
– Issue a School Attendance Notice (SAN)
– Issue court proceedings
– Seek permission not to prosecute (this would usually
be because of mitigating factors, such as, illness,
family bereavement, child protection concerns,
medical condition etc)
– In very exceptional circumstances, for the case to
remain open where this is deemed to be appropriate
Factors that may indicate the need for legal action
• The parents avoid contact with EWS staff and do not respond to
the plan, letters or invitations to meetings
• EWS have tried a number of different approaches to engagement
with no success
• Parents decline to work in partnership or to co-operate with the
agreed intervention for their child
• Parents are openly hostile and /or verbally aggressive towards
EWS staff and it proves impossible to engage them in any further
positive action or intervention for their child
• It is deemed to be in the best interests of the child/young person
• It is believed that the parent is capable of doing more to enable
the child to attend
The review will decide on 1 of 6 options selected
from the list below:
 Need met, cease intensive intervention, move
back to targeted/ preventative/universal
support
 Successful, continue support for longer
 Not working, give it more time
 Not working, re-think plan
 Not working, escalate to approach for
students with serious attendance issues (see
next slide)
 Other
Moving down the continuum
from Intensive Interventions
to
Targeted, Universal/Preventative
or cessation
Recording in the
Understand – Plan – Do – Review
cycle
Overarching principles of recording
The purpose of recording
QUIZ – Module 4
Question
1. It is not always necessary to have a referral to start an intensive
intervention
2. Children and families are always encouraged to participate in the
understand plan do review cycle
3. It is essential to discover the child’s strengths and who is around to
offer support
4. An NEWB written assessment is undertaken only when it is thought
that an Intensive Intervention will be needed
5. NEWB can offer an intensive intervention only if agreed by a principal
6. NEWB offers a 3 dimensional assessment of a child
7. The assessment is focused on and will identify barriers to attendance,
participation and retention
8. Processes are in place for referring on both child welfare and child
protection concerns
9. The Plan can only be developed at the NEWB Conference (NC)
True False
QUIZ – Module 4
Question
True False
√
1. It is not always necessary to have a referral to start an intensive
intervention
2. Children and families are always encouraged to participate in the
understand plan do review cycle
√
3. It is essential to discover the child’s strengths and who is around to
offer support
√
4. An NEWB written assessment is undertaken only when it is thought
that an Intensive Intervention will be needed
√
5. NEWB can offer an intensive intervention only if agreed by a principal
√
√
6. NEWB offers a 3 dimensional assessment of a child
7. The assessment is focused on and will identify barriers to attendance,
participation and retention
√
8. Processes are in place for referring on both child welfare and child
protection concerns
√
9. The Plan can only be developed at the NEWB Conference (NC)
√
QUIZ – Module 4 (Continued)
Question
10. An outcome is a measurable result from an activity
11. Outcomes can be set in any part of the understand plan do review
cycle
12. It is not possible to set baselines for outcome measurement
13. Once the outcomes have been agreed in the plan, the interventions can
be chosen to ensure that the outcomes are met
14. It is the responsibility of all those individuals and/or agencies listed in
the plan to ensure that they carry out the actions agreed
15. The provision of intensive interventions is subject to active monitoring
via a review process
16. The review rarely considers whether an intervention should be stopped
17. The review always considers distance travelled from the baseline
18. In the case of serious non-attendance an EWO will be responsible for
managing the interventions as the Lead worker
True False
QUIZ – Module 4 (Continued)
Question
10. An outcome is a measurable result from an activity
True False
√
11. Outcomes can be set in any part of the understand plan do review
cycle
√
12. It is not possible to set baselines for outcome measurement
√
13. Once the outcomes have been agreed in the plan, the interventions can
be chosen to ensure that the outcomes are met
√
14. It is the responsibility of all those individuals and/or agencies listed in
the plan to ensure that they carry out the actions agreed
√
15. The provision of intensive interventions is subject to active monitoring
via a review process
√
√
16. The review rarely considers whether an intervention should be stopped
17. The review always considers distance travelled from the baseline
√
18. In the case of serious non-attendance an EWO will be responsible for
managing the interventions as the Lead worker
√
One Child Practice Model
Module 5
Data security and data protection
Data Protection Law
Slides provided by:
Catherine Allen
Partner, Mason Hayes & Curran
102
Data Protection Basics
• Key definitions
• The Eight Data Protection Principles (incl.
video)
• The Conditions for Processing
• Data Protection and the OCOTOP Model
• Data Security
• Subject Access Requests & Email
• Anti-virus software
• Q&A
103
Key Definitions:
• “personal data”/ “data subject”
• “relevant filing system” – the
temp test
104
Key Definitions:
• “processing”
• “data controller” / “data processor”
105
Key Definitions:
• “sensitive personal data”
106
Data Protection Principles
1. Obtain and process personal data
fairly and lawfully
2. Keep it only for one or more
specified purposes
3. Process it only in ways compatible
with the purposes for which it was
given to you originally
4. Keep it safe and secure
107
Data Protection Principles
5. Keep it accurate and up-to-date
6. Ensure it is adequate, relevant and
not excessive
7. Retain it no longer than is necessary
for the specified purposes or
purposes
8. Give a copy of his/her personal data
to any individual, on request
108
Conditions for Processing
• Different conditions for sensitive and nonsensitive personal data
• Non-sensitive personal data:
• Consent of the data subject
• Contractual necessity
• Non-contractual legal obligation of data
controller
• Vital interests of the data subject
• Functions of a public nature
• Legitimate interests of the data controller
109
Conditions for Processing
• Sensitive personal data:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Explicit consent of the data subject
Compliance with employment law obligations
Vital interests of the data subject
Processing by a not-for-profit organisation
Information made public by the data subject
Public functions (administration of justice, etc.)
Legal advice and establishing/defending legal rights
Medical purposes
Statistical compilation and analysis
Legitimate political activities
Substantial public interest (Regulations only)
Taxation
Benefits, pensions, assistance and allowances
110
Data Protection and the
Practice Model
• Why do I need to sign a data
processing deed?
• With whom can I share data?
• When are there restrictions on
sharing data?
• When are there no restrictions on
sharing data?
111
Data Security
Data Security:
• What do I have to do to keep the data
under my control secure?
• What should I do if I lose personal
data?
112
Subject Access Requests
& Email
- What is a subject access request?
- What do I do if I receive one?
- What do I do if the NEWB (or school)
receives one?
- What else should I think about?
113
Safe Practice
Helpful hints on safe practice
• The sending of emails
• Password protecting
• Anti-Virus firewalls and spyware
114
QUIZ – Module 5
Question
1. The Data Protection Acts only apply to records held on computer.
2. I can store my records using Dropbox.
3. I can share information about child safeguarding concerns with the
HSE/Gardaí without restriction.
4. All data breaches must be reported immediately to the NEWB.
5. I should change my computer password regularly.
6. I should always lock my computer screen when I am away from my
desk.
7. It is a good idea to store records indefinitely, in case they are needed.
8. I can share information about a child with Barnardos.
9. Emails that I send in a work context are always completely private.
True False
QUIZ – Module 5
Question
True False
1. The Data Protection Acts only apply to records held on computer.
√
2. I can store my records using Dropbox.
√
3. I can share information about child safeguarding concerns with the
HSE/Gardaí without restriction.
√
4. All data breaches must be reported immediately to the NEWB.
√
5. I should change my computer password regularly.
√
6. I should always lock my computer screen when I am away from my
desk.
√
7. It is a good idea to store records indefinitely, in case they are needed.
√
8. I can share information about a child with Barnardos.
√
9. Emails that I send in a work context are always completely private.
√

similar documents