Plenary - Activating individuals

Report
Activating Individuals:
Understanding Behaviour Change
When Working in Communities
Ninon Lewis
EYC Faculty, IHI
David Halpern
Behavioural Insight Team, Cabinet Office/No. 10
Our Continued Vision…
2
Drivers of Community Activation
Three Levels of Activation:
• Activating individuals:
Community organizing,
storytelling, facilitative
leadership, behaviour change
• Activating organisations:
Community collaboration and
governance
• Activating communities
Understanding community
assets, participatory decision
making
4
Activating at the
Individual Level
What Activation Might Look Like:
•
•
Single mom trained as a community volunteer
coaching a newly pregnant woman about
opportunities for and importance of prenatal care.
Local third sector volunteers spreading the word to
citizens about an upcoming community listening
session around a particular area of EY work.
The Role:
•
•
•
•
Understanding how they influence
shared community goals
Sharing personal stories and an
urgency for change
Building up leaders around them
Participating in readily available
venues for designing solutions
Communities where citizens have the
capacity to make change…
Design interventions that
will enact behaviour
change
Use language that meets
individuals where they're
at
Give people a voice and
venues to use it
Develop metrics that
speak to people
Cultivate individuals’
personal stories that
communicate the urgency
and need for change
Understand and build
access to imbedded
power structures and call
out marginalised voices
Develop leadership
capacity at all levels
6
Communities where citizens have the
capacity to make change…
Design interventions that
will enact behaviour
change
Use language that meets
individuals where they're
at
Give people a voice and
venues to use it
Develop metrics that
speak to people
Cultivate individuals’
personal stories that
communicate the urgency
and need for change
Understand and build
access to imbedded
power structures and call
out marginalised voices
Develop leadership
capacity at all levels
7
Applying Behavioural Insights
David Halpern
Behavioural Insight Team, Cabinet Office/No. 10
Applying behavioural insights
Glasgow, 29th May 2013
Dr David Halpern
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
Most policy concerns behaviour
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
A rich and growing literature
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
Fantastic summary text
Guide for Policymakers
Shows Implications for Policy
“Our government will find intelligent ways to
encourage, support and enable people to
make better choices for themselves.”
Lord O’Donnell
Head of Academic Advisory
Panel
David Cameron
Prime Minister
Academic Advisory
Panel
Richard Thaler (Chicago)
Peter Tufano (Oxford)
Theresa Marteau
(Cambridge)
Peter John (UCL)
Maurice Birlotti (UCL)
Nick Chater (Warwick)
Sir Jeremy Heywood
Cabinet Secretary and
Head of Steering Board
Behavioural Insights Team
Dr David Halpern, Director Simon Ruda
Owain Service, Deputy Director Alex Gyani
Dr Rory Gallagher
Joanne Reinhard
Dr Laura Haynes
Hugo Harper
Samuel Nguyen
Elspeth Kirkman
Felicity Algate
Michael Sanders
Christina Stejskalova
Marcos Pelenur
A simple framework:
‘EAST’
To change behaviour,
make it:
Easy
Attractive
Social
Timely
Defaults
Simplification
Remove
friction
1. Pension opt-outs
90%
...stay in
80% vs. 6%
Vastly more effective than subsidies
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
2. Direct to form – every click matters
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
2. Direct to form – every click matters
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
% Response Rates to Letters Sending
People to the Webpage vs the Form
25%
20%
23.4%
19.2%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Webpage
Direct to Form
3. Loft insulation – its not money
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
Loft insulation relative to baseline
5.5
4.8
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
1.0
1.1
Control
Group Discount
0.5
0.0
Source: Behavioural Insights Team, 2012
Loft Clearance at cost
4. Helping consumers be ‘econs’
1. Scan your bill
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
2. Switch & save
midata
To change behaviour,
make it:
Easy
Attractive
Social
Timely
Salience
Messenger
Personalisation
Affect
Incentive design
5. Handwritten envelopes
Mr K. Greenley
32 Acacia Avenue
Newtown
Dream Land.
DM7 4MM
Mr K. Greenley
32 Acacia Avenue
Newtown
Dream Land.
DM7 4MM
Kevin,
You really need
to open this
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
5. Handwritten envelopes
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
% Response Rate to white envelopes with
personalised messages vs. brown envelopes with no
message
30%
25%
26.0%
21.8%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Brown
Personalised
6. Sweets – giving a day’s salary
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
6. Sweets – giving a day’s salary
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
Giving One Day’s Salary
20%
17%
11%
12%
7%
5%
0%
Control
Group
Celebrity
Sweets
Personal
email
Sweets +
Personal
Norms
Networks
To change behaviour,
Reciprocity
make it:
Active commitments
Eyes & faces
Easy
Attractive
Social
Timely
7. Social norms and tax
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
Nine out of ten people pay their tax on time.
7. Social norms and tax
CabinetOffice
% paying after 23 days
Behavioural Insights Team
39.0%
37.2%
35.9%
35.1%
33.6%
Control (8,558)
UK Norm (8,300) Local Norm (8,403) Debt Norm (8,779) Local + Debt Norm
(8,643)
8. People helping people
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
To change behaviour,
Priming
make it:
Framing
Key moments
Easy
Attractive
Social
Timely
9. Legacy Giving
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
Proportion Leaving a Legacy Gift
15.40%
10.40%
5.00%
10. Getting people into employment
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
1. Cut down process
2. Commitments
3. Strengths identification
10. Getting people into employment
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
% off-flow from benefits after 13 weeks
80%
69%
70%
66%
65%
61%
60%
57%
55%
55%
58%
56%
53%
50%
40%
Feb
Mar
April
May
June
July
Aug
Conclusions
We are applying across policy areas
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Growth
Employment
Red Tape Challenge
Consumers
Energy
Fines and incentives
Social mobility
Crime
Giving
Well-being
Conclusion – BI is having major impacts
CabinetOffice
Behavioural Insights Team
RCTs
& what works
Goals
swb
Policies
Midata; regulation; public
health; php
Processes
Tax letters; texts; call-centres scripts
etc
http://blogs.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/behavioural-insights-team
Communities where citizens have the
capacity to make change…
Design interventions that
will enact behaviour
change
Use language that meets
individuals where they're
at
Give people a voice and
venues to use it
Develop metrics that
speak to people
38
Cultivate individuals’
personal stories that
communicate the urgency
and need for change
Understand and build
access to imbedded
power structures and call
out marginalised voices
Develop leadership
capacity at all levels
39
Language is important!
Improvement-Focused Language
Activation-Focused Language
“Developing aims”
“Developing a common goal”
“Project Charter”
“A plan for reaching the common goal”
“Testing”
“Trying out our ideas to see how they work”
“Process Mapping”
“Mapping the big picture of how things get done”
“Measurement for improvement”
“Finding out if changes are working”
“Spread and Scale Up”
“Getting more people involved and sharing what
works”
“Holding gains”
“Maintaining and dealing with set-backs”
“Differentiate between testing, implementing, and
spreading changes”
“Distinguish the differences between trying out
new things, making new things a part of our daily
lives, and sharing these things with others”
“Community asset mapping”
“Mapping our community’s strengths and what
makes our community great, including people,
places, passions, and how those strengths can
help our efforts”
40
Cultivating Your Personal Story
Inertia
Apathy
Fear
Isolation
Self Doubt
Urgency
Anger / “This is unacceptable”
Hope
Community
You Can Make a Difference
STORY OF SELF: The values that move YOU to act—what calls
you to leadership.
STORY OF US: The values and shared experiences embedded
in our community calling us to collective action
STORY OF NOW: The urgent challenges to those values and
clarifies why action must be taken NOW.
41
The Power of Distributed Leadership
“Leaders are those who take responsibility for
enabling others to achieve shared purpose in
the face of uncertainty” - Marshall Ganz
It's not about identifying exceptional people, and
giving them exceptional talents and gifts, and
watching them do exceptional things!
42
The Power of Distributed Leadership
•
•
•
•
•
•
Originally adapted from Marshall Ganz, Harvard University.
Modified by the New Organizing Institute.
Sole responsibility
High anxiety
Usually the person everyone
goes to
No good plan if the leader
drops out
“Every one is a leader!”
Who’s responsible for
coordinating everyone? For
pushing everyone forward?
Who takes ultimate
responsibility for the
outcome?
43
The Power of Distributed Leadership
Understands that we don’t yet have all
the leaders we need in order to win
the change we want to see.
• Relies on reaching out and finding
leaders in your community who can
help you recruit and coordinate
others.
• They may not be people others
usually see as leaders, but they are
people committed to change, willing to
invite others to join them in the hard
work of moving a campaign forward.
•
Originally adapted from Marshall Ganz, Harvard University.
Modified by the New Organizing Institute.
44
The Power of Distributed Leadership
You must be able to trust them to delegate
responsibility to other dedicated, reliable
people, and to follow through on commitments.
You may be the leader in the middle, or part
of a leadership team in the middle, guiding
others’ efforts and being held accountable for
outcomes, but you will be deeply reliant on your
relationships with others for success.
Assumes that you must accept a lower level
of control to get more power.
Originally adapted from Marshall Ganz, Harvard University.
Modified by the New Organizing Institute.
45
The Power of Distributed Leadership
Identify at least one leader within the community
who you can spot and develop as a leader.
Could be at any level.
Cultivate leadership potential:
– Listen and call-out: “I love your idea. Tell me more
about it.”
– Be deferential: “You’re at the front line everyday, what
do you think about this? What are you hearing?”
– Straight up positive reinforcement.
Individual Activation at Work in East
Renfrewshire
David Halpern
Behavioural Insight Team, Cabinet Office/No. 10
54
Putting the E.A.S.T to Work(15 Mins)
•
•
•
Work with 1-2 ppl around
you
Start by thinking of a
challenge you are
currently facing in your
work…
How would you make
change:
•
•
•
•
EASY
ATTRACTIVE
SOCIAL
TIMELY
55
Wrap Up
When designing PDSA cycles in
your next breakout session, be
sure to think through the EAST
framework
Good luck!

similar documents