C CSG Fatigue Risk Mgt Guideline - Kirsty McCulloch

Report
The CSG Industry –
Working Together To Address our
Safety Challenges
Joint Industry – Contract – Regulator
Forum
6 May 2011
CSG Industry Fatigue
Risk Management
Guideline
Dr Kirsty McCulloch
Sleep, Alertness & Fatigue
Big consequences if we don’t get it right…
Accident Risk
Performance
Health/Social
Fatigue Risk Management Models
Traditional
FRM
• Restricted Hours
• Industrially Negotiated
• Largely Ineffective at
FRM
Proposed
CSG FRM
• Multiple Controls
• “Red Flag” System
• Identify Risk  Manage
Risk
Managing Fatigue: It’s All About Sleep!
Sleep Opportunity (Work Hours)
Actual Sleep
Symptoms and
Behaviours
Errors &
Near-misses
INCIDENTS
Dawson & McCulloch (2005), Sleep Medicine
Reviews, 9 (5), 365-380
Sleep Opportunity: Planned Work Hours Guidelines
Max work hours in a 24-h period
12 hours
Min break length between shifts
10 hours
Max number of shifts worked in a row
15 shifts
Min number of days off per 28 days
7
Min breaks within shifts
30 minutes
every 4 hrs
Window of Work
0600-2200*
* Any work should be conducted within these hours, but is not expected to last for the duration
Sleep Opportunity: Actual Work Hours Guidelines
Max work hours in a 24-h period
(once off basis)
Max work hours in a 24-h period (for 2
or more days in a row)
16 hours
14 hours
Min break length between shifts
8 hours
Max number of shifts worked in a row
21 shifts
Min number of days off per 28 days
Min breaks within shifts
7
30 minutes
every 5 hrs
Summarising Hours of Work Guidelines
 Planned work hours
Red flag  Fatigue Management Plan
− Consider impact on safety critical tasks
− Fatigue modelling to maximise sleep
opportunity & recovery
−
 Actual work hours
−
Avoid excursions from planned work hours
− Where required, stay within the prescribed
limits
− Business/safety requirement to exceed
actual work hours limits – only with
individual’s consent, and with formally
documented strategies in place
 Work Environment/Work Tasks
Managing Fatigue: It’s All About Sleep!
Sleep Opportunity (Work Hours)
Actual Sleep
Symptoms and
Behaviours
Errors &
Near-misses
INCIDENTS
Dawson & McCulloch (2005), Sleep Medicine
Reviews, 9 (5), 365-380
10
500
9
400
8
300
7
200
6
100
1910
1930
1950
1970
1990
Caffeine (mg/head/day)
Sleep (hrs)
Actual Sleep: Personal Fitness for Work
Actual Sleep: Personal Fitness for Work
Minimum of 6 hours sleep
every 24 hours
 How do we achieve this?
−
Training & education
− Culture & FFW expectations
− Encourage self-reporting for trend
analysis
 Challenges
Perceptions of ‘fatigue’ as a threat
− Travel to work & start shift
− Short changes
− Sleep disorders
−
Symptoms & Behaviours: Personal Fitness for Work
Physical
Mental
Emotional
Yawning
Heavy Limbs
Appearance
Poor Concentration
Disorganisation
Easily Distracted
Quiet and Withdrawn
Lack of Motivation
Increased Stress Levels
Headache/Nausea
Sore Eyes
Poor Coordination
Slow Reaction Speed
Poor Communication
Situational Awareness
Poor Info Processing
Poor Memory
Mood Change
Decreased Tolerance
Irritability
Extreme Drowsiness
Heavy Eyelids
Micro-sleeps
Falling Asleep
Poor Decision Making
Risk Taking Behaviour
Errors
Uncontrolled Temper
Aggression
Symptoms & Behaviours: Personal Fitness for Work
Active intervention for symptoms
of moderate or high severity
 How do we achieve this?
−
Training & education
− Culture & FFW expectations
− Encourage self- & peer-reporting for trend
analysis
 Challenges
Perceptions of ‘fatigue’ as a threat
− Perceptions of ‘dobbing’
− Flexibility with mitigation strategies
−
Risk Identification  Risk Mitigation
ID
• Have rostered hours been exceeded?
ID
• Has the individual obtained at least 6hrs sleep in the
last 24hrs?
ID
• Is the individual experiencing fatigue-related symptoms
or behaviours?
Mitigation
• What safety critical tasks is this individual performing?
• What could potentially go wrong if they’re tired?
Mitigation
• Should this individual continue with planned work?
• What can be done to reduce the likelihood of error?
Incident Investigation
 Fatigue is an unrecognised contributor to many workplace
incidents
 The more info we can gather about the nature & consequence
of fatigue, the better we can manage it
 Investigations should consider:
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
Work history
Number of consecutive night shifts
Breaks during the shift
Nature & demands of work tasks & work environment
Travel time before and after shifts
Sleep history of the individual(s) involved
Medical issues that may contribute to fatigue (e.g. sleep disorders)
Observed fatigue-related symptoms & behaviours
Substances likely to cause drowsiness or prevent sleep
Questions?
Dr Kirsty McCulloch
Santos Ltd
[email protected]
p: (08) 8116 5360
m: 0401 059 030

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