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PRESENTED BY
YEFON TEAM 4
At World Engineering Conference (WECSI 2014) held at Abuja
Project Supervisor:
Engr. Professor Simon V. Irtwange (FNSE)
Team 4 members
Ogunberu Samson Oluwaseun
Oyeleke Olukemi Oluwabukola
Balogun Ibrahim
Tugbobo Abiodun Joseph
Lewis-Wikina Sira M.O
Ajayi Solomon Oluwatobi
870
million
Nearly
people of the 7.1
billion people were
suffering from
chronic
undernourishment
in 2010 – 2012.
…
(FAO, 2012)
AIM OF THE PROJECT
To come up with an
infrastructure
design
that will enhance food
production,
consumption,
and
poverty eradication.
NEW AND EMERGING CHALLENGES
•
•
•
•
•
Threats to agricultural production
Rising food prices
Population growth
Rapid diet changes
Poverty
NIGERIA SCENARIO

Population estimate of 173.6 million people (World Bank,
2013)

Seventh most populous country in the world with
population growth at 3.2% per annum.

Over 80million hectares of arable land.

Largest economy in Africa, GDP > $500 Billion

A member of MINT group of countries

Among the “Next Eleven: economies set to become
among the biggest in the world
NIGERIA SCENARIO
Nigeria so rich yet still ranked amongst the top 5
countries with highest number of people living poor i.e.
living below 1 US dollar/day (The World Bank 2014).
Poverty remains a challenge in Nigeria’s development
efforts. On the other hand, relatively impressive
economic growth rates were recorded during the 20002007 period.
Nigeria Real GDP Growth
12
10
8
GDP Value
Agriculture
account for
47% of the
GDP from
1960 - 2006
6
4
2
0
-2
Value
Change%
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
10.3
10.6 5.4 6.2
7
6
7
8
7.4 6.6 6.3 7.1
2.42% -49.0 15.17 12.25 -14.1 16.31 14.60 -7.77 -10.4 -4.85 13.87
POVERTY TREND IN NIGERIA
Poverty Level
(%)
Estimated Total Population
Poverty Population
1980
28.1
65 million
17.7 million
1985
46.3
75 million
34.7 million
1992
42.7
91.5 million
39.2 million
1996
65.6
102.3 million
67.1 million
2004
54.7
126.3 million
69.09 million
2010
60.9
159.2 million
96.8 million
2013
33.1
173.6 million
57.5 million
Sources: Based on the Harmonized Nigeria Living Standard Statistics (HNLSS, 2010), National
Bureau of Statistics (2007), World Bank (2013).
Agricultural
sector is the
single largest
employer of
labour forces
(70%
according to
NBS, 2005)
“Roads, electricity supplies, telecommunications,
and other infrastructure services are limited in all rural
areas, although they are of key importance to stimulate
agricultural investment and growth”
- (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations (FAO) 1996, chapter 10, p.15)
Infrastructure
Infrastructure is the basic
physical
structures
and
organizational
needed
for
the
operation of a society like
industries,
bridges,
buildings,
health
governance and so on.
roads,
services,
Food Production
Food
production
is
the
process of transforming raw
ingredients into prepared food
products.
Food Consumption
Food consumption refers to the
amount of
food or nutrient
available for human consumption
according to FAO Balance sheet
Poverty
Poverty, can be understood as
a condition in which a person or
community is deprived of, and
or lacks the essentials for a
minimum standard of well-being
and life. Poverty is defined as
the lack of or inability to achieve
a socially, acceptable standard of
living.
(Copenhagen World Summit on Social development (UN 1955),
POVERTY TREND IN NIGERIA
Poverty Level
(%)
Estimated Total Population
Poverty Population
1980
28.1
65 million
17.7 million
1985
46.3
75 million
34.7 million
1992
42.7
91.5 million
39.2 million
1996
65.6
102.3 million
67.1 million
2004
54.7
126.3 million
69.09 million
2010
60.9
159.2 million
96.8 million
2013
33.1
173.6 million
57.5 million
Sources: Based on the Harmonized Nigeria Living Standard Statistics (HNLSS, 2010), National
Bureau of Statistics (2007), World Bank (2013).
FOOD PRODUCTION IN NIGERIA
Agricultural
production
in
Nigeria has increased at slightly
less than 1 percent per year,
compared with about 2 percent
in developing countries overall
FOOD PRODUCTION IN NIGERIA
Food Production Index
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
Sources: Based on data from www.indexmundi.com. (Food production index covers food crops
that are considered edible and that contain nutrients over the past 50 years.)
FOOD CONSUMPTION IN NIGERIA

Food availability and
affordability is still a
concern
 In Nigeria, the consumption
pattern is skewed towards
food
 Food consumption is
2,710Kcal
 Maize is the number one
staple food, followed by
rice, as they provide
humanity’s major source of
carbohydrates in Nigeria.
Soybean
3%
Sorghum
7%
Yam
10%
Cassava
16%
Cowpea grain
12%
Rice
15%
Groundnut
11%
Plaintain
6%
Maize
20%
Frequency of consumption of stable
food crops at the national level
(Source: IITA Nigeria Food Consumption
Nutrition Survey, 2003)
and
POVERTY ALLEVIATION PROGRAMMES IN NIGERIA
 Operation Feed the Nation (OFN)- 1979
 Green Revolution – (1979-1983)
 Peoples Bank - (1985-1993)
 Nigerian Agricultural Land development Authority (NALDA)
 National Directorate of Employment (NDE)
 Family Economic Advancement Programme (FEAP)- (1993 – 1998)
 National Poverty Eradication Program (NAPEP) – 2001.
 Youth Empowerment Scheme (YES)
 Rural Infrastructures Development Scheme (RIDS)
 Social Welfare Services Scheme (SOWESS)
 Transformation Agenda
Sustainability Development
Sustainable development is development that
meets
the
needs
of
the
present
without
compromising the ability of future generations to
meet their own needs. It contains within it two key
concepts: the concept of needs, and the idea of
limitations imposed by the state of technology and
social organization on the environment’s ability to
meet present and future needs.
DESIGNING THE INFRASTRUCTURE:
The need for appropriate infrastructure is an urgent and ongoing global
requirement. Sufficient infrastructure is indispensable for economic
development. This helps to determine a country’s success or failure in
diversifying production, coping with population growth, reducing
poverty, improving environmental conditions, etc.
In order to provide a framework for sustainable infrastructure for
food production, food consumption and poverty eradication, it is
imperative to view and analyze infrastructure as it relates to the
three
broadly-accepted
sub-categories
of
sustainability:
environmental sustainability, economic sustainability, and social
sustainability.
DESIGNING THE INFRASTRUCTURE:
CURRENT STATUS
 84 Million Hectares of Arable land
 263 Billion cubic metres of water
 200,000 Km of road networks
 Power generation in the country is about 4000MW.
 Nigeria electricity consumption per capita is 111 kWh
 The railway now accounts for less than 1% of land
transport in the country.
INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN OPTIONS FOR
ENHANCED FOOD PRODUCTION
SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN
MODEL
MODEL 1
MODEL 1
MODEL 2
MODEL
SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE
DESIGN: BENEFITS TO THE POOR
• Reduce transaction costs and facilitating trade
flows within and across borders.
• Lower the costs of inputs used in the production.
• Open up new opportunities for entrepreneurs.
• Creates employment, including in public works
• Improve access to schools and health centres.
• Improve environmental conditions, which link to
improved livelihoods, better health and reduced poverty
CONCLUSION
The African saying that “once the problem of food is
addressed in the life of a poor fellow, the poverty level has
been substantially solved” remains valid.
There is a direct correlation between the level of poverty in
Nigeria and development of agriculture.
Hence, enhanced food production and consumption is a
sine aqua non for alleviation of poverty.
CONCLUSION
Adequate provision of and investment in regional
infrastructure ranging from rural roads and railways, to
irrigation systems, telecommunications, clean water, agroprocessing centres, efficient electricity supplies and such
basic social infrastructure as health, education, banking
and commercial services, are Panacea for enhanced food
production, food consumption and poverty eradication in
Nigeria, and Sub-Saharan Africa at large.
POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
 Provision of needed assistance to Nigerian farmers to
transform and adopt the use of modern technology so as to
stimulate higher productivity in agriculture and reduce the
level poverty in the country.
 Direct involvement and encouragement of private sector
participation in mechanized farming system.
 Proper monitoring of financial infrastructure policies by
the necessary parastatals.
POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS
 Provision of well-designed physical infrastructure (in both
rural and urban communities) to facilitate higher
agricultural productivity, distribution and minimize ruralurban drift so as to encourage farmers to concentrate in
agricultural activities.
 Finally, creation of an enabling environment of macro-
economic to encourage investment in agriculture by both
indigenes and foreigners.
References
 Food and Agriculture Organization, 2012; " The state of Food insecurity in the
World 2012“ http://fao.org/docrep/016/13027/e/3027e00.htm
 Manyong V.M, A. Ikpi, J.K Olaleyemi, S.A., Yusuf B.T, Omonona V. Okuowa
and F.S, Idacaba, 2005; Agriculture in Nigeria identifying opportunities for
increased commercialization and investment IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria.
 World Bank (2001).” World Development Report: Attacking Poverty, World
Bank, Washington D. C.
THANK YOU

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