H - Los Angeles Community College District

Report
Los Angeles Harbor College
Institutional Effectiveness
Report
presented to the
LACCD Board of Trustees
July 24, 2013
Mr. Farley Herzek
College President
Mr. Luis Rosas
Vice President Academic Affairs
Dr. Kristi V. Blackburn
Dean of Institutional Effectiveness
Dr. Bobbi Villalobos
Dean of Academic Affairs
College Strategic Plan: Priorities & Outcomes
LAHC Educational Master Plan 2013-17
• FTES growth plan
• 4%+
• Deans/Faculty developed plan
to reach 7300 FTEs
• Increase retention/persistence/
transfer/degree and certificate
completion
• Student Success (implementation of
SB1456)
• Continue Infrastructure Support
• 3 years of balanced budget
(including surplus 2013)
• SLOs and Accreditation
District Strategic Plan: 2011-12 Baseline Data
Percentage of eligible students receiving financial aid
Harbor
Mission
Pierce
Southwes
t
Trade-Tech Valley
City
East
West
DISTRICT
Pell Grant
(comes w/
BOGG)
7,754
12,764
4,327
4,073
8,392
3,380
6,257
7,478
4,121
58,546
BOGG Only
5,269
10,642
2,324
2,613
4,127
2,347
6,345
5,764
4,039
43,470
92%
94%
89%
Est. % of eligible students receiving any Financial Aid [Pell Grant (comes with BOGG) or
BOGG Only]
79%
94%
93%
84%
91%
97%
83%
Percentage of new students
completing assessment in English
YEAR
C
E
M
P
S
61.2%
H
74.5%
2009
59.4%
73.7%
64.7%
77.2%
2010
63.1%
63.9%
74.3%
72.5%
69.4%
2011
58.1%
61.9%
71.4%
76.0%
73.9%
T
V
W
Total
51.4% 73.4%
60.8%
64.8%
76.4%
37.4% 70.7%
61.0%
64.7%
78.2%
28.8% 72.7%
62.7%
63.6%
Percentage of new students
completing assessment in MATH
YEAR
C
E
H
M
P
S
2009
60.1%
81.5%
71.7%
75.3%
66.1%
76.6%
2010
64.2%
84.1%
71.7%
73.8%
70.6%
2011
60.8%
85.6%
69.2%
77.2%
74.6%
T
V
W
Total
54.5% 73.4%
61.0%
69.6%
76.0%
39.7% 74.9%
62.1%
69.8%
77.6%
33.5% 75.0%
63.6%
70.0%
Percentage of new students successfully completing
at least one math & English class in first year
YEAR
C
E
M
P
S
T
V
W
Total
21.6%
H
21.4%
2009
14.8%
14.9%
17.9%
22.2%
13.1%
8.2%
20.8%
15.5%
2010
14.9%
23.1%
16.3%
24.8%
19.5%
27.3%
13.5%
9.8%
20.8%
14.6%
2011
14.7%
15.8%
12.6%
20.9%
15.1%
23.0%
10.4%
7.2%
19.9%
17.1%
Persistence: Fall to Spring & Fall to Fall
YEAR
C
E
H
M
P
S
T
V
W
Total
09 FA-10SP
84.4
88.3
88.1
83.8
86.6
80.5
80.8
84.8
82.7
85.4
10FA- 11SP
86.2
91.1
88.2
83.3
88.3
79.1
79.4
85.0
81.2
86.2
11FA-12SP
86.9
91.0
89.0
83.8
90.2
83.2
79.2
85.6
83.3
87.2
09FA- 10FA
68.1
77.4
73.7
73.2
75.8
61.3
60.6
73.6
65.0
72.1
10FA-11FA
70.0
80.8
75.4
70.5
77.9
55.5
64.5
76.1
63.2
73.6
11FA-12FA
72.3
80.0
74.6
74.6
79.1
68.8
65.3
75.8
68.4
75.2
Goal 2 continued: 6 YEAR OUTCOMES
2004
C
1. 64.3%
H
E
I
69.2% 61.8% 54.3%
M
61.3%
P
S
T
V
68.4% 50.1% 58.6% 65.6%
W
55.7%
DISTRICT
2.
41.6%
46.0% 40.3% 28.6%
36.0%
44.7% 27.1% 35.9% 41.9%
31.3%
41.0%
3.
27.6%
33.5% 24.1% 25.7%
29.6%
38.9% 16.4% 15.7% 36.7%
21.8%
30.6%
4.
32.3%
35.5% 35.0% 40.0%
30.3%
45.3% 21.0% 27.7% 39.0%
30.9%
35.9%
64.4%
2005
C
1. 63.8%
H
E
I
69.4% 64.8% 57.6%
M
65.0%
P
S
T
V
71.5% 42.3% 56.8% 66.6%
W
49.2%
DISTRICT
65.1%
2.
38.7%
45.5% 39.1% 24.2%
37.6%
47.5% 22.1% 37.3% 41.1%
27.4%
40.9%
3.
27.7%
31.9% 23.3% 39.4%
32.5%
39.6% 10.9% 13.1% 35.6%
17.0%
30.1%
4.
30.4%
33.3% 33.9% 51.5%
29.6%
45.9% 16.3% 29.4% 38.6%
27.6%
35.1%
2006
C
1. 63.5%
H
E
I
69.3% 63.9% 52.2%
M
62.1%
P
S
T
V
72.6% 46.2% 62.6% 66.1%
W
56.1%
DISTRICT
65.9%
2.
41.7%
45.8% 38.8% 34.8%
37.9%
48.4% 26.1% 38.7% 41.4%
30.4%
42.1%
3.
29.7%
35.7% 24.2% 43.5%
31.4%
44.4% 15.3% 17.8% 36.1%
20.3%
32.9%
4.
29.2%
33.2% 34.5% 47.8%
26.3%
44.3% 18.4% 28.7% 35.2%
28.5%
34.0%
1. New students completing 30 units within 6 years (%)
2. New students completing 60 units within 6 years (%)
3. Complete Engl 101 & Math 125 (or above) within 6 years
4. Completion rate (cert., degree, transfer) within 6 years
Goal 2 continued: 3 YEAR OUTCOMES
H
2007
C
E
I
1. 60.7% 62.8% 53.5% 66.7%
2. 30.8% 32.2% 19.5% 29.4%
M
P
S
T
V
W
55.8% 66.2% 38.0% 54.1% 60.5% 49.6%
DISTRICT
59.5%
24.7% 32.9% 15.9% 25.8% 29.7% 21.2%
28.6%
3.
22.2% 25.5% 11.5% 25.5%
22.0% 33.1% 11.1% 10.0% 29.9% 12.7%
23.9%
4.
12.4% 14.8% 12.2% 23.5%
15.1% 22.5%
16.4%
9.8%
13.2% 18.2% 15.9%
H
2008
C
E
I
1. 60.4% 61.4% 57.9% 68.1%
M
P
S
T
V
W
55.3% 65.6% 38.5% 50.1% 58.4% 50.8%
DISTRICT
2.
26.2% 30.1% 24.1% 31.9%
23.8% 34.2% 13.5% 22.2% 27.4% 18.4%
27.3%
3.
20.1% 23.3% 15.4% 29.8%
23.4% 31.5%
9.7%
10.4% 26.6% 13.1%
22.5%
4.
10.8% 13.9% 13.8% 27.7%
12.2% 21.9%
8.5%
13.1% 14.2% 15.1%
15.0%
58.6%
2009
C
1. 58.7%
2. 26.1%
H
E
I
65.8% 59.9% 54.9%
31.7% 20.6% 29.6%
M
55.1%
23.1%
P
S
T
V
67.7% 46.2% 53.4% 61.3%
34.3% 17.2% 22.7% 29.9%
W
53.2%
16.9%
DISTRICT
61.0%
27.8%
3.
17.2%
26.4% 10.4% 28.8%
20.7%
34.5% 14.3% 10.7% 27.9%
14.0%
23.4%
4.
5.3%
11.2%
8.9%
17.3%
11.8%
11.5%
9.5% 21.1%
1. New students completing 30 units within 3 years (%)
2. New students completing 60 units within 3 years (%)
3. Complete Engl 101 & Math 125 (or above) within 3 years
4. Completion rate (cert., degree, transfer) within 3 years
7.4%
9.4% 12.7%
ACCJC Student Success Targets Set
 ACCJC Annual Report 2013
 Joint meeting of Assessment
Committee and Achieving the
Dream Data Team
•
•
•
•
•
Std for course completion: 70%
Std for retention: 53%
Std for degree completion (#): 539
Std for transfer to 4-year (#): 350
You never change things by
Std for certificate completion (#): 102 fighting the existing reality. To
change something, build a new
model that makes the existing
model obsolete.
--Buckminster Fuller
Alignment of College Plan to the DSP
Goal 1. Access and Preparation for
Success:
Improve equitable access; help
students attain important early
educational momentum points.
 Achieving the Dream year 2
interventions. Discussed further in
presentation
Goal 2. Teaching & Learning for Success:
Strengthen effective teaching and
learning by providing a learnercentered educational environment;
help students attain their goals of
certificate and degree completion,
transfer, and job training and career
placement; increase equity in the
achievement of these outcomes.
 Career Technical Education:
Certificate development and
completion
 SLO Assessment: Complete
integration of SLOs with Planning
 Curriculum Development: TMC AA-T
degrees
 LAHC Technology Annual Plan
 Distance Ed Plan: Expand offerings and
increase degree pathways
Alignment of College Plan to the DSP
Goal 4. Resources and Collaboration:
Increase and diversify sources of revenue in
Improve organizational effectiveness
order to achieve and maintain fiscal stability
through data-informed planning and
and to support District initiatives. Enhance
and maintain mutually beneficial external
decision-making, process assessment, and
partnerships with business, labor, and
professional development.
industry and other community and civic
organizations in the greater Los Angeles
 Analysis and development of FTES
area.
growth plan:
 Financial Sustainability
– Improve college funding base
– The college has now embarked on a
path to invest the new reserves in
while growing efficiency in order to
program growth so we can become self
develop additional funding to
sustaining while fulfilling accreditation
improve student success.
and district requirements.
 EWD
 Planning Process
– Increase grant funding sources
– Educational Master Plan as a
– Increase industry partnerships in
guiding document in the planning
community
 Human Resources Plan
process
– Use data to determine staffing needs of
 SLOs (next slide)
all constituencies of the campus
– Very positive feedback on the 2 plans
completed thus far from ACCJC visiting
teams, citing it as a “best practice”
Goal 3. Organizational Effectiveness:
Student Learning Outcomes Update
•
•
•
•
Course
Program
Institutional
SAOs
Fall 2012
81%
55%
60%
100%
Spring 2013
85%
55%
60%
100%
• ISLOs are up to date within 5 year assessment plan
– 3 of the college’s 5 ISLOs have been measured; 4th in progress. Final ISLO
planned for 2013-14
– ISLOs will be at 100% in 2013-14
• By spring of 2014 :
– Course level SLOs have been written (defined)
– The college MUST have completed 100% of course level SLOs complete a full
cycle: defined/measured/results used and refined definitions
– Program level SLOs must also be 100% assessed
– SLO Coordinator working with Deans, VP Academic Affairs to accomplish SLO
plan in effect for 2013-14 to achieve goal of 100%
• The knowledge accumulated from these assessments must be
incorporated in 2013-14 Program Reviews & results be reflected in Unit
plans for 2014-2015 planning cycle
Accreditation Update
Accreditation Update
College Recommendation 1: As previously stated in Recommendation 2 by the 2006 Comprehensive
Evaluation Team and in order to meet Standards, the planning process needs to reflect an ongoing
and systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, resource allocation, implementation, and
re-evaluation that uses data as the central focus to inform decisions. The process needs to be
made clear to the college constituencies so they understand the steps, as well as which plan
informs which plan. In addition, human resource planning for classified personnel and
administrators needs to be evidence- based and integrated with institutional planning and
program review. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the planning process as well as the
effectiveness of programs and services needs to be included. (I.B.2, I.B.3, I.B.6, I.B.7, III.A.6).
Feedback provided from the Visiting Team:
Number of actions taken to address the recommendation. Most notably, breaking down the
recommendation into the workable pieces, the college was able to address each facet thoroughly.
– Infrastructure creation (shared governance calendar, planning documents calendar) has
streamlined planning activities to the betterment of college planning.
– Evidence included qualitative and quantitative methods in the evaluation of planning
(process and product)
– Data present and used in planning and budgeting activities.
– College more closely following the Planning Policy and Procedure Manual; encouraged to
reflect on Program Review Manual and adhere to it more closely.
– HR Plan 2012-13 reflected planning and budgeting activities was very data driven and tied to
planning documents (unit plans and program reviews). Transparency of the data and process
was noted in its role for helping the college employees understand decision making at the
college regarding “staffing”.
“As a result of various policy and procedural improvements implemented since the 2012 visit, the
college’s planning processes for program review and resource allocation were dramatically
improved and are now considered examples of good practices.”
Accreditation Update
College Recommendation 2: In order to meet the Standard, and to adequately
monitor salary and benefit expenditures and insure the institution practices
effective oversight of finances, the team recommends that salary actions
should first be reviewed for available and adequate funding prior to
initiating the employment process. (III.D.2.d).
Feedback provided from the Visiting Team:
Provided an increase of infrastructure necessary for oversight and monitoring:
creation of forms which are derived from planning documents. Change to
Centralized model increased the oversight and monitoring.
Quarterly budget meetings resulting in better alignment of units to the budget
requests to spending/priorities. Better oversight.
“The college is commended for its extensive use of integrated, data driven, and
decision-making planning resulting in a multiple voices representation for
each Cluster.”
The visiting team believed that the college has fully met the accreditation
standard recommendations listed above. It is anticipated at the June 2013
convening of the ACCJC for the college’s probationary sanction to be
removed and the college be “fully accredited”.
Achieving the Dream
• 3 Interventions
– Front Door--FYE
– Math Progression
– Cultural Equity and Awareness
• Outcomes measurements are still in
progress.
– Spring 2013 grades will be included in
analysis.
• All interventions are being leveraged with
grant activities such as Title V, STEM grant,
Bank of America financial literacy grant,
Learning Works grant.
FRONT DOOR INTERVENTION:
First Year Experience
• Orientation
• Summer Bridge
Retreat
• Small Learning
Communities
• Learning Coaches
• Sophomore year
guidance
• Student Success
Society
• Service Learning
Fall 2012 FYE Retention and Completion
Course
Retention
Course Successful
Completion
Avg Units
Attempted
Avg Units
Completed
OUTCOMES DATA
FALL 2012
n
FYE Cohort
Art 103
104
99.0%
93.3%
2.74
10.44
10.70
English 28
72
98.6%
81.9%
2.70
10.57
11.06
PD 17
73
100.0%
97.3%
2.70
10.49
10.97
ServLrn 100
67
98.5%
85.1%
2.74
10.42
11.00
316
99.1%
89.9%
2.72
10.48
10.91
Art 103
38
76.3%
63.2%
2.38
8.58
6.87
English 28
75
82.7%
61.3%
2.18
9.12
8.03
PD 17
27
96.3%
96.3%
2.77
8.44
7.41
ServLrn 100
25
84.0%
72.0%
3.23
8.00
8.80
Total
165
83.6%
69.1%
2.46
8.72
7.78
All Courses
Art 103
192
77.6%
60.9%
2.50
8.14
6.98
(Includes Comparison
Group)
English 28
590
84.4%
67.6%
2.35
9.02
8.00
PD 17
167
94.0%
89.2%
2.58
8.99
8.43
25
84.0%
72.0%
3.23
7.98
8.78
974
84.7%
70.1%
2.44
8.82
7.89
Total
Comparison
ServLrn 100
Total
GPA
FYE End of Semester Survey/Results n=62













Close to 80% indicated using faculty office hours.
85% interacted with Counselors. 30% seeing them once/week or more
40% experience interference from work in meeting academic deadlines
98% indicated that feedback from instructors helps them determine
their status in the class
96% felt the contributions they make in class are valued
55% took advantage of Study Skills Enhancement workshops
77% use the Math Learning Center
58% never use the Writing Center (area for further exploration)
46% use the Learning Assistance Center
65% indicate it has been hard to learn to manage time effectively
90% had volunteered in community
85% have asked an instructor for assistance after class
98% have social interactions with someone of a different race/ethnicity
Math Progression
Curriculum Re-Design
• California Acceleration Project (3CSN) 2012-13
• STEM Pathway
– Summer Bootcamp prep for students
– 4 semester sequence Pre-Algebra to Calculus
– Imbedded tutoring
• Non-Stem Pathway
– Pre-req of Pre-Algebra leading into Math 227 Stats
Fast Track
– Began before joining Achieving the Dream in 2011
– Increased with Achieving the Dream momentum
– Housed in the Learning Assistance Center
Curriculum Re-Design: STEM
A
STEM
Section
ALL Math
123A
ALL Math
(excl. Math
100 – lab)
B
C or
P
D
F or
NP
W
Retaine
d
Complete
d
14
7
7
1
2
4
88.6%
80.0%
71
65
78
33
59
75
80.3%
56.2%
37
1
38
3
502
19
8
257
40
4
80.9%
59.4%
Fall 2012 STEM: Math 123A
The STEM cohort had a higher
retention rate (88.6%) compared to
all Math 123A and all other Math
students.
• All STEM students (28) who successfully completed the course
in Fall 2012 enrolled the following semester.
• Of the 28 STEM students who successfully completed the course
in Fall 2012, 92.9% enrolled in Math 123B the following semester.
Grades in this course will be tracked.
n=35
STEM cohort
n=381
ALL Math 123A
Successful
Completion of
STEM
Successful
Completion of
STEM and Enrolled
in Spring 2013
80%
28/35
100%
28/28
Successful Completion of
Math 123A
56.2%
214/381
Successful Completion of
STEM and Enrolled in Math
123B in Spring 2013
The STEM cohort also had a
significantly higher completion rate
(80.0%) compared to all Math 123A
(56.2%) and all other Math students
(59.4%).
Course alignment with Math 227
92.9%
26/28
Successful Completion of Math 123A and
Enrolled in Spring 2013
93%
199/214
Successful Completion of STEM and
Enrolled in Math 123B in Spring 2013
82.7%
177/214
Math Fast Track
Math Persistence
N= 1215
• 37.6% took first math
class before Fast Track
– Higher retention rate
after FT: 84.3%
(compared to 77.7%)
• 22.1% after or concurrent
with FT
– Higher completion
rate after FT: 57.8%
(compared to 52.7%)
• 40.3% no math enrmt
N
Cohort
Math Enrollment 1 2 semesters
semester after
after
3 semesters 4 semesters
after
after
137 Winter 2011
43.1%
24.1%
19.7%
131 Summer 2011
33.6%
25.2%
29.8%
244 Fall 2011
28.3%
15.6%
201 Winter 2012
42.8%
20.9%
121 Spring 2012
14.9%
380 Summer 2012
37.1%
14.6%
Overall Persistence
N
Cohort
LAHC Enrollment 2 semesters
1 semester after
after
3 semesters 4 semesters
after
after
137 Winter 2011
70.1%
56.2%
71.5%
131 Summer 2011
84.7%
71.0%
62.6%
244 Fall 2011
77.9%
48.4%
201 Winter 2012
91.5%
67.7%
121 Spring 2012
73.6%
380 Summer 2012
86.3%
43.8%
Cultural Equity and Awareness
Addressing Poverty
– Financial Literacy
– Bank of America grant and Title V grant
– CGCA (Counseling Guidance Career Assistant) role
– Outreach to high schools and continuation schools
– Martin Luther King, Jr. “Days of Service”
Multicultural Center
– Cultural Literacy
– Planning, implementation, and evaluation in years
2, 3,and 4, respectively
Grant opportunities
– Seed money to establish Multicultural Center
– $40,000 Learning Works grant
• Culturally responsive training for faculty, staff,
students
Martin Luther King, Jr. Days of Service
After learning about financial literacy, how will you
manage your money now?
I will use/continue to use a money
management system.
I feel more prepared to manage my
money.
No answer
To what extent do you now understand
how your family/cultural background
affects your relationship with money?
49%
I understand that my family/cultural
background determines my values…
49%
There is some relation, but I don't fully
understand it.
2%
How much have you learned about budgeting
techniques and utilizing the money that you receive?
26%
3%
What do you now know about
Martin Luther King Jr's commitment to service?
17%
Very knowledgeable.
I know how credit and interest works, so I will
use techniques to help me manage and
decrease my debt.
59%
A little knowledgeable.
53%
I know that it's hard to get out of debt, so I
should pay a little more than requested each
month.
No answer
39%
2%
20%
2%
I will wait to get a credit card until I know I
will be responsible using it.
No answer
22%
43%
What do you now know about using credit and getting
out of debt?
I can pay minimum, low payment and I'll be
fine.
15%
I don't believe it affects me.
I still don't understand the connection
I am confident and will use/continue to
use at least one budgeting technique.
I feel somewhat prepared to handle my
budget.
I understand budgeting, but probably
won't do it.
59%
24%
2%
Pre-Test/Post-Test Survey Design
n= 60
Students reflected improvement in
knowledge of financial literacy.
Year 3: Scaling Up & Institutionalizing
• Including initiatives in the College
Educational Master Plan and College
Annual Plan
• Integrating Achieving the Dream work
into existing shared governance
committees on the campus
• Creating and implementing Face-toFace Orientation involving the campus
community
• Continuing data examination and
discussion
– ACCJC Data Reporting changes
expected to include disaggregation
of data and how we are attempting
to overcome inequities

similar documents