48x36 poster template

Report
TITLE GOES HERE USING BOLD AND LARGE TYPE SO IT IS
VISIBLE FROM SEVERAL FEET AWAY
Your
1Your
1
Name
and Community Partner’s
High School
2Community
2
Name
Partner’s Organization
ABSTRACT
MATERIAL AND METHODS
RESULTS
In 200-300 words, the abstract should state: 1) motivation of project, 2)
questions or objectives of project, 3) 1-2 sentences stating what was done
(methods), 4) 1-2 sentences stating major findings, and 5) implications of
findings.
I recommend using a bullet point format for the methods section. It allows
readers to quickly glean what was done. You may also want to break the
methods section into multiple parts. For example:
Again, I recommend using a bullet point format in the results section. You may
also want to break the results section into multiple parts depending on the
project. The results section should include several figures. The more figures,
the better. Use figures over tables because the findings will be easier to observe
by the readers. Try to make some figures a little larger than others for added
visual appeal, or emphasis.
Use a san-serif font (e.g. Arial or Helvetica). This type is easier to read at a
distance when there is a lot of text. Use a large font size, such as 26 point. Try
not to go below 24 point. Make sure font type and size is consistent throughout
the poster.
The best contrast for poster text is black text on white background. However,
that can be changed for a more colorful poster. Just make sure there is a stark
contrast between the font color and background.
You can highlight this text and replace it with your own. Having this template
should make it easier for you to create your own poster. But, feel free to
rearrange the layout to one that best suits your project.
Study Area and Organism
•
•
•
•
Describe exactly where project conducted (e.g. geographic location)
Describe the environment of study sites
Describe how many sites
Describe study organism
Component 1 of Study
Data Collection Protocol
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Describe each step completed to collect data
Describe instruments used to collect data
Describe dates and times of when data was collected
Major finding number 1
Major finding number 2
Component 2 of Study
Major finding number 1
Major finding number 2
Of course, the above is just suggestions of what to include in this section. This
section will vary from project to project and should be tailored in a way that
most effectively outlines what was done in your project.
INTRODUCTION
INSERT PHOTO
OR FIGURE
The introduction should be 1-3 short paragraphs. Or you may choose to use
bullet point format for the introduction. Whatever format is used, avoid long
paragraphs of text.
The introduction should be organized such that you first introduce the overarching problem or issue that your project is addressing (think about why
anyone should care about your project; what problem are you addressing that is
important to the layperson). Present general aspects of the topic early in the
introduction, then narrow toward the more specific information that provides
context, finally arriving at your statement of purpose and rationale.
INSERT PHOTO
OR FIGURE
INSERT PHOTO
OR FIGURE
The introduction should answer the following questions: 1) why is this
project/study important?; 2) what did we know about this topic before this study
was conducted?; and 3) what are the objectives of this study?
Remember to clearly state the question that the study will address and
hypotheses or the objectives of the study at the end of the introduction.
Conclusions can be written in paragraphs or in bullet point format. The bullets
can be formatted using the Format/Bullets and Numbering command from the
menu bar above.
Fig 2. Include a photo or figure legend that clearly describes what the photo/fig
is displaying. If it contains two parts, label one part (a) and the other (b). Don’t
forget to refer to the photo/fig in the text. Also, number photo/fig in the order
they are referred to in text (e.g. Fig 1, Fig 2, etc.). The same applies for tables,
but limit the number of tables. Figures are better than tables.
•
•
•
Fig 1. Include a photo or figure legend that clearly describes what the photo/fig
is displaying. Don’t forget to refer to the photo/fig in the text. Also, number
photo/fig in the order they are referred to in text (e.g. Fig 1, Fig 2, etc.). The same
applies for tables, but limit the number of tables. Figures are better than tables.
Fig 3. Include a photo or figure legend that clearly describes what the photo/fig
is displaying. If it contains two parts, label one part (a) and the other (b). Don’t
forget to refer to the photo/fig in the text.
CONCLUSIONS
Text and Figures from Excel or Word
INSERT PHOTO OR FIGURE
(THE MORE PHOTOS/FIGURES
THE BETTER!)
INSERT PHOTO
OR FIGURE
EXCEL: select the chart, use Edit/Copy, and then Edit/Paste into PowerPoint.
The chart can then be re-sized to fit as needed. If you need to edit parts of
the chart, ungroup it. Watch out for scientific symbols. PowerPoint will not
recognize them in imported text or figures so you may have to go back
through your text and add symbols back in using the symbols font.
WORD: select the text to be brought into PowerPoint, use Edit/Copy, then
Edit/Paste the text into the text box. You can edit the text by changing the
size, color, italics or bold, or add other effects using Format/Font in the menu
bar above.
PICTURES: use the Insert/Picture/From File command in the menu bar above
to insert figures that are not PowerPoint based, such as JPG images of
photographs. These should never be “pasted” into a PowerPoint file.
A good way to make sure your figures look okay on your poster is to view it at
100%. Scroll around to see if the images look good. If not, they won’t look good
in final print.
In the conclusions section the reader should take away the implications of the
findings of the study. Interpret the findings of the study. How can the findings be
use to inform management or conservation policy. Again, the exact information
discussed in this section is dependent on the nature of the project.
Headers (e.g. INTRODUCTIONS, MATERIALS AND METHODS, RESULTS,
CONCLUSIONS) can be renamed to create a better layout for your project.
Don’t forget to go into Format in the menu bar above and use the Align option to
align all text boxes and figures/tables to create a clean look to your poster.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Congrats! You are almost done creating your poster! Take the time to reflect on
your experience and all the professionals that helped you complete this
community project. Thank all of your community partners, teachers, and funding
sources that helped you complete this project. Keep it brief, but be thoughtful.
REFERENCES
Include a bibliography of all literature cited in the poster. This section should be
short.

similar documents