Liz Buttner`s Presentation on State Standards

Report
Next Generation Science Framework,
Standards and Assessment:
Fall 2013 Update
Liz Buttner, Science Education Consultant
CT State Department of Education
[email protected]
11/4/2013
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Framework describes a reformed “vision” of what it
means to be proficient in science:
• “knowing science” means applying the Practices to
demonstrate understanding of Core Ideas and
Crosscutting Concepts;
• Details the Practices, Core Disciplinary Ideas, and
Crosscutting Concepts
NGSS adds assessable Performance Expectations:
• Adds performances students should be able to
achieve at the conclusion of instruction (end of year;
end of grade band; or on a large-scale assessment).
• Assigns Performance Expectations to each grade (K-5)
and to 6-8 and 9-12 grade bands.
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NGSS present an opportunity to improve curriculum,
instruction, teacher development, assessment,
accountability, and ultimately student interest and
achievement in science.
Will NGSS adoption improve science teaching and
learning in Connecticut?
Can teaching new standards using current approaches
yield improved results?
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NGSS ADOPTION MEANS…
Much more than teaching new topics
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A Reformed Vision of Science Proficiency
Are educators and parents ready to embrace a new
vision of what it means to be “proficient” in science?
• “ Focus on understanding and application as opposed to
memorization of facts devoid of context.” (NGSS Appendix A)
• “The integration of content and application reflects how
science is practiced and experienced in the real world.” (NGSS
Appendix A)
• “Most state standards and assessments express these
dimensions as separate entities, leading to their separation in
both instruction and assessment.” (NGSS Appendix A)
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New Ways of Assessing for Accountability
Are educators ready to prepare students to
succeed on state assessment questions like this?
“Analyze and interpret data to determine scale
properties of objects in the solar system.” (MSESS1-3)
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Inclusion of Engineering Design in
K-12 Science Curriculum
• ETS1.A: Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems
– A situation that people want to change or create can be approached as
a problem to be solved through engineering (K-2)
• ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions
– Tests are often designed to identify failure points or difficulties, which
suggest the elements of the design that need to be improved (Gr. 3-5)
• ETS1.C: Optimizing the Design Solution
– The iterative process of testing the most promising solutions and
modifying what is proposed on the basis of the test results leads to
greater refinement and ultimately to an optimal solution (Gr. 6-8)
Design, build, and refine a device that works within given
constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of
energy* (HS-PS3-3)
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Coordinating Science with CCSS-ELA and Math
An opportunity for science to be an integral part of students’
comprehensive education by supporting student learning of
ELA/literacy and math expectations within the context of science
instruction.
TURN AND TALK:
• What are the
benefits?
• What are the
potential pitfalls
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CT Science Framework
Gr. 5 Earth/Space
CMT Expected Performances
• B22. Explain the cause of
day and night based on the
rotation of Earth on its axis.
• B23. Describe the monthly
changes in the appearance
of the moon, based on the
moon’s orbit around the
earth.
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NGSS – Gr. 5 Earth/Space
5-ESS1-2: Represent data in
graphical displays to reveal
patterns of daily changes in
length and direction of
shadows, day and night, and
the seasonal appearance of
some stars in the night sky.
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Comparing CT to NGSS Assessables:
Elementary
NGSS
CONNECTICUT
EXPECTATION 3-PS2-1
EXPECTED PERFORMANCE B.8
Plan and conduct an
investigation to provide
evidence of the effects of
balanced and unbalanced
forces on the motion of an
object.
Describe the effects of the
strengths of pushes and pulls
on the motion of objects.
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Comparing CT to NGSS Assessables:
Middle School
CONNECTICUT
NGSS
EXPECTED PERFORMANCE C15.
PERFORMANCE EXPECTATION
MS-LS1-2
Describe the basic structures of
an animal cell, including the
nucleus, cytoplasm,
mitochondria and cell
membrane, and how they
function to support life.
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Develop and use a model to
describe the function of a
cell as a whole and ways
parts of cells contribute to
the function.
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Comparing CT to NGSS Assessables:
High School
NGSS
CONNECTICUT
EXPECTED PERFORMANCE D28
Describe the general role of
DNA and RNA in protein
synthesis.
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PERFORMANCE EXPECTATION HS-LS1-1
Construct an explanation based
on evidence for how the
structure of DNA determines the
structure of proteins which carry
out the essential functions of life
through systems of specialized
cells.
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Will require:
•
Preparing students for new, more rigorous, assessments (not just remembering
facts). NGSS Performance Expectations ARE assessment outcomes.
•
3 years of high school science for all students;
•
All students to learn biology, physics, chemistry and Earth/Space science in a
progression laid out for K-2, 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12 grade bands;
•
Inclusion of Engineering Design concepts, practices and outcomes at all grade
bands;
•
Standards to be translated into coherent curriculum learning units;
•
Curriculum performance expectations be developed;
•
Modifications to existing teaching approaches and materials;
•
Substantial professional learning opportunities (see MSP 2013-2015 project
categories);
May require more teachers certified to teach high school Earth Science and Physics.
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Moving Toward Next Generation Science in CT
PHASE 1: REFLECTION (2011-2013)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
NGSS Draft feedback to Achieve
Collaborate with other states (BCSSE)
Progress reports to State Board of Education
Content Crosswalk
District Survey
Policy implications
Adoption Decision
PHASE 2: PREPARATION (2012-2013)
–
–
Policy decisions (MS/HS courses; cumulative or end-of year tests, certification)
Stakeholder awareness
PHASE 3: TRANSITION (2014-2018)
–
–
–
–
–
Professional development system ; new teaching approaches (MSP)
Teacher preparation program upgrades
Curriculum transition timeline
Curriculum and materials modifications
Teaching and learning
PHASE 4: FULL IMPLEMENTATION (2017-18 school year)
–
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New assessments introduced
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Possible Connecticut Transition Timeline
STANDARDS:
• 2013-14 school yr: 2004 Science Framework, GLCs, GLEs in
effect
• Early 2014: CT adoption decision anticipated
POSSIBLE CURRICULUM TRANSITION:
• 2014-17: Districts develop and transition to new science
curriculum and instructional approaches
• 2014 and beyond: Professional development
POSSIBLE ASSESSMENT TRANSITION:
• March 2014-16: CMT and CAPT Science assessments administered
(tentative)
• Spring 2017: New or hybrid science assessments? Uncertain
whether end-of-grade, end-of-course or cumulative
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Taking Time to Make Informed Decisions
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NRC Framework:
Vision and
Broad Goals
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NGSS Standards:
Assessments:
Assessment
Expectations by
Grade and Grade
Band
How will
attainment of
goals be
measured?
* Curriculum
* Teaching Materials
* PD System
* Teacher Prep courses
* Assessments
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• How will large scale assessments measure Practices integrated
with Core Ideas? For example: “Develop and use a model to
describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a
chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.” (MS-PS1-5)
• Who will pay for innovative, new tests?
• How long will it take to develop such tests?
• Will new science tests be cumulative or administered at every
grade?
• How many states will adopt NGSS? How will publishers address
NGSS?
AND…
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• Districts are currently tackling much change:
- Common Core implementation
- Teacher evaluation SLOs and IAGDs
- Personalized learning
- Competency-based report cards
• NGSS assessment consortia have not been formed or
funded. New ways of testing “practices” not
determined yet.
• Publishers have not yet developed new instructional
materials to illustrate the NGSS vision.
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Embrace the vision defined in the “Framework for K-12 Science
Education” (National Research Council, 2012) and…
• Adopt all NGSS Assessment Expectations (Performance
Expectations) only;
• Adopt some NGSS Assessment Expectations;
• Adopt NGSS Assessment Expectations and develop Curriculum
Expectations similar to CT K-8 Grade-Level Concepts (GLCs) and
Grade-Level Expectations (GLEs);
• Revise current CT Framework and Standards to reflect NRC
Framework Core Ideas, Practices and Crosscutting Concepts;
• Collaborate with other states to develop curriculum standards.
• Other possibilities…
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ACTIVITY
PURPOSE
COMPLETIONDATE
Content Crosswalk
Identify which NGSS concepts are in CT standards at the same
grade; at a different grade; or not in CT standards at all. Findings
available October 2013.
April 2013
District Implications Survey
Elicit district input related to capacity and challenges associated
with adoption and transition to NGSS.
September 2013
Instructional Shifts Report
Compare vision for science teaching and learning in NRC
Framework to current CT standards; highlight key shifts.
Fall 2013
Elicit district input related to challenges and opportunities for
organizing NGSS standards into course sequences for all students.
January 2014
Middle/High School CourseMapping Study Groups
Higher Education Focus Groups
Elicit input on NRC Framework/NGSS adoption from higher
education science/engineering & teacher prep faculty. What are
potential impacts on students’ success in college STEM courses or
majors, and on teaching approaches used in undergraduate
science courses.
January 2014
Adoption Options Focus Group
Convene state NGSS Content Review Committee to compare final
NGSS publication to January 2013 feedback to Achieve. What
concerns persist? What adoption options address the concerns.
February 2014
Recommendations to State Board
of Education
Present adoption recommendations, including systemic
improvements and a phased-in transition timeline if adoption is
recommended.
Early 2014
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NGSS-CT Content Crosswalk
• CSDE committee compared curriculum concepts in NGSS to those in
current state standards. DID NOT COMPARE PERFORMANCE
EXPECTATIONS. Crosswalk answers the following questions:
– Which NGSS concepts have a match in Connecticut standards at the
same grade (or grade band);
– Which NGSS concepts have a match in Connecticut standards at a
different grade (or grade band);
– Which NGSS concepts have no match in Connecticut standards and
would be new for teachers and students;
– Which Connecticut standards have no match in NGSS and could
potentially be removed from science curriculum and assessment if
NGSS were adopted?
– Which grades or grade bands would have the greatest proportion of
curricular change if NGSS were adopted?
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NGSS-CT Content Crosswalk Highlights
Complete report to be posted soon. Highlights include:
– About two-thirds of the concepts in the NGSS have a match in
Connecticut’s current state standards;
– Most new content would be in Gr. 9-12: engineering design; wave
properties; electromagnetic radiation; evidence of common ancestry
and diversity; the universe and its stars and history of planet Earth
– More physical science in Gr. K-5.
– Current state science standards apply only to Grades 9 and 10, in
keeping with the state requirement for two years of high school
science and the state CAPT Science assessment administered at Grade
10.
– NGSS are intended to apply to Grades 9 through 12, and would require
at least three years of high school science coursework.
– Implications?
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Content Crosswalk Headlines
Greatest change would be felt in Grades 9-12*:
–
only 51% of NGSS concepts are required of all students in current
state standards.
–
61% of NGSS Physical Science Gr. 9-12 concepts would be new
requirements for all Connecticut high school students;
–
58% of the NGSS Earth/Space Science Gr. 9-12 concepts would be
newly required of all Connecticut high school students.
* Disparity partly because current state science standards apply only to
Grades 9 and 10, in keeping with the state requirement for 2 years of high
school science and the state CAPT Science assessment administered at
Grade 10.
NGSS, by contrast, are intended to apply to Grades 9 through 12, and would
require at least 3 years of high school science coursework.
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Content Crosswalk Headlines
Concepts in current Connecticut standards that
do not have a match in NGSS include:
– Bacteria, viruses, infectious disease; optical
technologies; food preservation
technologies; biotechnology; nutrition; and
the physics of bridges
– Could be addressed in curriculum designed
to teach ETS2: Links Among Engineering,
Technology, Science and Society
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District Implications Survey
• Circulated from mid-August through late September 2013.
• Solicits collective and individual feedback about district “capacity” for
science program reform: curriculum, science leadership, teaching
materials, professional development.
• Over 550 responses from assistant superintendents, district science
coordinators, teachers, coaches and other district-level personnel.
• Will inform a set of adoption recommendation to be brought to State
Board of Education.
• Will be used to Identify and plan for resources, supports and costs
associated with NGSS adoption, transition and implementation.
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STAYING INFORMED
• NGSS newsletters
– Are you on the CSDE science mailing list?
– Contact Liz Buttner at [email protected] to
subscribe
• RESC Science Council presentations
• CSTA and CSSA events
• SDE science web page: www.sde.ct.gov
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