ProjectDay2

Report
Day 2
Agenda
 Questions?
 Any ideas for the Integrated Project?
 First part due September 26
 Assignment 1 Posted
 Read Case Study 1.1, Megatech Inc., and Case Study 1.2, The It
Department at Hamelin Hospital. Complete and upload the
answers to the Question at the end of each case study. Make
reference to the concepts presented in Chapter 1 when answering
the questions. Due September 17 prior to class.
 Why Project Management?
Copyright 2005 Prentice Hall
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
Ch 1 -2
Why Project Management?
01-03
Chapter 1 Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter, students will be able to:
 Understand why project management is becoming such a
powerful and popular practice in business.
 Recognize the basic properties of projects, including their
definition.
 Understand why effective project management is such a
challenge.
 Differentiate between project management practices and
more traditional, process-oriented business functions.
 Recognize the key motivators that are pushing companies
to adopt project management practices.
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-02
Chapter 1 Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter, students will be able to:
 Understand and explain the project life cycle, its
stages, and the activities that typically occur at each
stage in the project.
 Understand the concept of project “success,” including
various definitions of success, as well as the alternative
models of success.
 Understand the purpose of project management
maturity models and the process of benchmarking in
organizations.
 Identify the relevant maturity stages that
organizations go through to become proficient in their
use of project management techniques.
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-05
Rescue of Chilean Miners
Source: http://framework.latimes.com/2010/10/07/chile-miner-rescue/#/0
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
6
Introduction
 Examples of projects
 Split the atom
 Tunnel under the English Channel
 Introduce Windows 7 8
 Plan next Olympic games in London
“Projects, rather than repetitive tasks, are now the basis
for most value-added in business”
-Tom Peters
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-07
® Scott Adams, Inc./ Dist. By UFS, Inc.
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
Process vs. Project Work
Process
• Ongoing, day-to-day
activities to produce
goods and services
• Use existing systems,
properties, and
capabilities
• Typically repetitive
Project
 Take place outside the
normal, process-oriented
world
 Unique and separate from
routine, process-driven
work
 Continually evolving
A project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to create
a unique product or service.
PMBoK 2008
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-09
Process & Project Management
Process
(Table 1.1)
Project
1. Repeat process or product
1. New process or product
2. Several objectives
2. One objective
3. Ongoing
3. One shot – limited life
4. People are homogeneous
4. More heterogeneous
5. Systems in place to integrate
5. Systems must be created to
efforts
6. Performance, cost, & time known
integrate efforts
6. Performance, cost & time less
certain
7. Part of the line organization
7. Outside of line organization
8. Bastions of established practice
8. Violates established practice
9. Supports status quo
9. Upsets status quo
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-10
Additional Definitions
 A project is a unique venture with a beginning and an
end, conducted by people to meet established goals
within parameters of cost, schedule, and quality.
Buchanan & Boddy 92
 Projects are goal-oriented, involve the coordinated
undertaking of interrelated activities, are of finite
duration, and are all, to a degree unique.
Frame 95
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-011
Project Definitions Summarized
A project can be considered any series of activities and
tasks that have:
 Specific objectives to be completed within certain
specifications,
 Defined start and end dates,
 Funding limits,
 Human and nonhuman resources, and
 Multifunctional focus.
01-012
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
Elements of Projects
 Complex, one-time processes
 Limited by budget, schedule, and resources
 Developed to resolve a clear goal or set of goals
 Customer-focused
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-013
General Project Characteristics
 Ad-hoc endeavors with a clear life cycle
 Building blocks in the design and execution of
organizational strategies
 Responsible for the newest and most improved products,
services, and organizational processes
 Provide a philosophy and strategy for the management of
change
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-014
General Project Characteristics
 Entail crossing functional and organization boundaries
 Traditional management functions of planning,
organizing, motivating, directing, and controlling apply
 Principal outcomes are the satisfaction of customer
requirements within technical, cost, and schedule
objectives
 Terminated upon successful completion of performance
objectives
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-15
Project Success Rates
 Software & hardware projects fail at a 65% rate,
 Over half of all IT projects become runaways,
 Only 30% of technology-based projects and programs are a
success.
 Only 2.5% of global businesses achieve 100% project
success and over 50% of global business projects fail,
 Average success of business-critical application
development projects is 32%, and
 Approximately 42% of the 1,200 Iraq reconstruction
projects were eventually terminated due to
mismanagement or shoddy construction
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-16
Happens more often than most people think!
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
117
Why are Projects Important?
1.
Shortened product life cycles
2. Narrow product launch windows
3. Increasingly complex and technical products
4. Emergence of global markets
5. Economic period marked by low inflation
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-18
Project Life Cycles
 Conceptualization - the development of the initial
goal and technical specifications.
 Planning – all detailed specifications, schedules,
schematics, and plans are developed
 Execution – the actual “work” of the project is
performed
 Termination – project is transferred to the customer,
resources reassigned, project is closed out.
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-19
Project Life Cycles
Man Hours
Conceptualization
Planning
Execution
Termination
Fig 1.3 Project Life Cycle Stages
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-20
Project Life Cycles and Their Effects
FIGURE 1.4 Project Life Cycles and Their Effects
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-21
Quadruple Constraint of Project Success
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
Figure 1-6
01-22
Four Dimensions of Project Success
FIGURE 1.7
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-23
Six Criteria for IT Project Success
 System quality
 Information quality
 Use
 User satisfaction
 Individual impact
 Organizational impact
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-24
Understanding Success Criteria
Iron Triangle Information System Benefits (Organization) Benefits (Stakeholders)
Cost
Maintainability
Improved efficiency
Satisfied users
Quality
Reliability
Improved effectiveness
Social and environmental
Time
Validity
Increased profits
Information quality
Strategic goals
Personal development
Use
Organization learning
Professional learning,
Reduced waste
impact
contractors’ profits
Capital suppliers, content
Project team, economic
impact to surrounding
community
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
Table 1.2
01-25
0
1
2
3
Not defined or poor
Defined but substandard
Standardized
Industry leader or cutting edge
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126
Spider Web Diagram (Figure 1.8)
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-27
Spider Web Diagram with Embedded
Organizational Evaluation
Figure 1-9
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-28
Developing Project Management Maturity
Project Management Maturity (PMM) Models
 Center for Business Practices
 Kerzner’s Project Management Maturity Model
 ESI International’s Project Framework
 SEI’s Capability Maturity Model Integration
 See Table 1.3 (page 21) in text for comparsions
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-29
Center for Business Practices PMM
 Level 1: Initial Phase
 Level 2: Structure, Process, and Standards
 Level 3: Institutionalized Project Management
 Level 4: Managed
 Level 5: Optimizing
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-30
Kerzner’s PMM Model
 Level 1: Common Language
 Level 2: Common Processes
 Level 3: Singular Methodology
 Level 4: Benchmarking
 Level 5: Continuous Improvement
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-31
ESI International’s Project Framework
 Level 1: Ad Hoc
 Level 2: Consistent
 Level 3: Integrated
 Level 4: Comprehensive
 Level 5: Optimizing
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-32
SEI’s Capability Maturity Model Integration
 Level 1: Initial
 Level 2: Managed
 Level 3: Defined
 Level 4: Quantitative Management
 Level 5: Optimizing
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-33
Project Management Maturity Generic Model
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
FIGURE 1.10
01-34
Using Maturity Models
 Determines Organizational adaptation of Best
Practices
 Analyze and assess
 Benchmark
 Change
 Re-Measure
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
135
TextBook organization
 Foundation




Chapter 1 - Introduction: Why
Project Management?
Chapter 2 - The Organization
Context: Strategy, Structure, and
Culture
Chapter 3 - Project Selection and
Portfolio Management
Chapter 4 - Leadership and the
Project Manager
 Planning




Chapter 5 - Scope Management
Chapter 6 - Project Team Building,
Conflict, and Negotiation
Chapter 7 - Risk Management
Chapter 8 - Cost Estimation and
Budgeting
 Planning (con’t)




Chapter 9 - Project
Scheduling: Networks, Duration
Estimation, and Critical Path
Chapter 10 - Project
Scheduling: Lagging, Crashing, and
Activity Networks
Chapter 11 - Critical Chain Project
Scheduling
Chapter 12 - Resource Management
 Implementation

Chapter 13 - Project Evaluation and
Control
 Termination

Chapter 14 - Project Close-out and
Termination
Project Elements and Text Organization
FIGURE 1.11 Organization of Text
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-37
Project Manager Responsibilities
1.
Selecting a team
2. Developing project objectives and a plan for
execution
3. Performing risk management activities
4. Cost estimating and budgeting
5. Scheduling
6. Managing resources
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-38
Overview of the Project Management
Institute’s PMBoK Knowledge Areas
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
FIGURE 1.12
01-39
Summary
 Understand why project management is becoming such a




powerful and popular practice in business today.
Recognize the basic properties of projects, including their
definition.
Understand why effective project management is such a
challenge.
Differentiate between project management practices and
more traditional, process-oriented business functions.
Recognize the key motivators that are pushing companies
to adopt project management practices.
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-40
Summary
 Understand and explain the project life cycles, its stages,
and the activities that typically occur at each stage in the
project.
 Understand the concept of project “success,” including
various definitions of success, such as the “triple
constraint,” as well as alternative models of success.
 Understand the purpose of project management maturity
models and the process of benchmarking in organizations.
 Identify the relevant maturity stages that organizations go
through to become proficient in their use of project
management techniques.
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-41
Copyright © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
01-42

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