School Presentation Powerpoint

Report
Name of your Lacrosse Team/League
Date
LACROSSE
History
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Deemed the fastest game on two feet, lacrosse has a rich and storied history that spans
centuries and is the oldest sport native to the North American continent.
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Rooted in Native American ritual and religion, the game was often played to resolve conflicts,
prepare for war, heal the sick and build strength.
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Until the mid-1930s, men's and women's lacrosse were played under virtually the same rules,
with no protective equipment. At that time, men's lacrosse rules began evolving
dramatically, while women's lacrosse continued to remain true to the game's original rules.
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Men’s college lacrosse allies with the NCAA in 1971; the first women’s NCAA championship is
held in 1982.
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US Lacrosse is founded in 1998 as the national governing body of men’s and women’s
lacrosse.
LACROSSE
General Overview
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Object of both men’s and women’s lacrosse is to score more goals than the opposing team by
shooting the ball into the opponent’s netted goal.
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Women's rules allow 12 players on the field, limit stick contact, prohibit body contact and
therefore, require little protective equipment.
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Men's lacrosse rules allow 10 players on the field and some degree of stick and body contact,
but violence is neither condoned nor allowed.
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Lacrosse is played primarily in the spring, but is also played in the summer and fall.
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Resembles strategies of basketball, soccer, hockey and field hockey on a field similar to a
soccer field.
LACROSSE
General Overview
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Players primarily use sticks with aluminum alloy or titanium handles and plastic heads with
mesh- or leather-strung pockets to catch, throw, scoop and shoot a solid rubber ball.
Women’s players can also use wooden sticks.
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Games involve quick sprints, passes, a motion offense and shots on goal. Its variety of
movements provides a fertile training ground for other, more established sports like football,
basketball and soccer.
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The game demands skill, aptitude and athleticism from its participants. Agility, speed,
endurance, hand-eye coordination and accuracy skills are honed while playing lacrosse.
LACROSSE
Growth
Over the past decade, the number of men, women and youths playing lacrosse has increased
another 9.6% each year to reach the estimated 684,730 people playing today.
Level
2001
2008
2009
2010
2011
Youth
125,000
265,214
297,271
324,673
361,275
High School
100,925
218,823
227,624
255,314
275,281
20,293
29,822
31,614
32,431
33,929
Professional
150
300
180
180
180
Post-College
7,563
10,071
11,342
12,201
14,065
253,931
524,230
524,230
624,593
684,730
College
Total
LACROSSE
Growth – College Snapshot
Lacrosse is a fully-sponsored NCAA championship sport for both men and women.
2011 US Lacrosse Participation Survey (Varsity and Club)
Men:………………………………………………………..20,397
Women:……………………………………………….....13,532
Total:……………………………………………………….33,929
No. College Players Annually
2001:……………………………………………………… 20,293
2002:……………………………………………………… 23,179
2003:……………………………………………………… 24,331
2004:……………………………………………………... 23,162
2005:……………………………………………………… 24,502
2006:……………………………………………………… 26,251
2007:……………………………………………………… 28,282
2008:……………………………………………………… 29,822
2009:……………………………………………………… 31,614
2010:……………………………………………………… 32,431
2011:……………………………………………………… 33,929
LACROSSE
Growth – High School Snapshot
2011 US Lacrosse Participation Survey [National Federation of State High School Associations
(NFHS) & USL Data]
Boys:………………………………………………………. 162,416
Girls:……………………………………………………….. 112,865
Total:………………………………………………………. 275,281
Growth Rates of NFHS Sports Boys, 2006-2011
1. Lacrosse ……………………………………………………..57.1%
2. Bowling………………………………………………………. 25.6%
3. Volleyball……………………………………………………. 20.4%
4. Water Polo…………………………………………………… 16.7%
5. Swimming…………………………………………………… 10.9%
Growth Rates of NFHS Sports Girls, 2006-2011
1. Lacrosse………………………………………………………48.2%
2. Bowling………………………………………………………. 30.2%
3. Ice Hockey………………………………………………….. 29.9%
4. Indoor Track………………………………………………… 12.6%
5. Water Polo…………………………………………………… 12.4%
LACROSSE
Growth – Youth Snapshot
Data collected from the US Lacrosse’s 64 regional chapters following the 2011 calendar year indicated
more then 360,000 youth players played lacrosse.
Number Youth Players Annually
2001:………………………………………………. 125,000
2002:………………………………………………. 137,500
2003:………………………………………………. 150,000
2004:………………………………………………. 186,048
2005:………………………………………………. 204,384
2006:………………………………………………. 220,797
2007:………………………………………………. 241,581
2008:………………………………………………. 265,214
2009:………………………………………………. 297,271
2010:………………………………………………. 324,673
2011:………………………………………………. 361,275
US LACROSSE
Leading the efforts for a rewarding, quality lacrosse experience
Our Mission
US Lacrosse is the national governing body of lacrosse. Through responsive and effective
leadership, US Lacrosse strives to provide programs and services to inspire participation while
protecting the integrity of the sport.
Our Vision
We envision a future which offers people everywhere the opportunity to discover, learn,
participate in, enjoy and ultimately embrace the shared passion of the lacrosse experience.
Contact
US Lacrosse  113 West University Parkway  Baltimore, MD 21210
Phone: 410-235-6882  Fax: 410-366-6735  [email protected]
www.uslacrosse.org  www.laxmagazine.com
US LACROSSE
Leading the efforts for a rewarding, quality lacrosse experience
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Largest, all-encompassing resource for lacrosse knowledge.
Founded in 1998 as the National Governing Body of men’s, women’s and youth lacrosse.
Largest lacrosse organization in the world, focused primarily on youth (U19) lacrosse,
education, safety and opportunities for all.
Volunteer-based organization - national board of directors and executive committee with
equal representation from the men’s, women’s and youth games.
Headquarters is located in Baltimore, Md., with a staff of more than 70, plus volunteers and
interns.
US Lacrosse has a network of chapters covering 43 states, committed to developing and
promoting the game starting at the grassroots level.
501 (c) (3) not-for-profit organization relies on membership dues, annual giving grants,
endowments, sponsorships to achieve organizational mission and vision.
Membership base grown to 361,275 in 2011.
LACROSSE
“So how safe is lacrosse?”
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Research shows men’s and women’s lacrosse to be relatively safe compared to other
commonly played team sports.
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Most injuries are minor strains, sprains and contusions, but more significant injuries can
and do occur.
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Sport Science and Safety Committee of US Lacrosse is sponsoring research to monitor
injuries, better understand their mechanisms and design preventive programs.
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Visit www.uslacrosse/safety for helpful articles, links and contact information regarding
lacrosse science and safety, access to concussion awareness programs, availability of AED
grant programs, tips on nutrition, heat and hydration, risk management and emergency
plans, age-appropriate athlete development and injury prevention and conditioning.
LACROSSE
“Why add a lacrosse program?”
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Lacrosse offers a sport option for athletes of all weights, shapes and sizes.
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Lacrosse is a great preparation for other sports that require strength, speed and agility.
Games involve quick sprints, passes, a motion offense and shots on goal. Its variety of
movements provides a fertile training ground for other, more established sports like football,
basketball and soccer.
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Lacrosse offers opportunity for student-athletes - one that may not be available in other
sports - to continue sports participation in college through a growing number of divisional
and club programs.
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Lacrosse embodies the student-athlete ethos. From the 2009 NCAA Graduation Rates
Report, men’s lacrosse has the highest graduation rate (88%) of all NCAA men’s sports;
women’s lacrosse is tied for the highest graduation rate (94%) of all NCAA
women’s sports.
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Lacrosse can offer coaches and officials of other sports opportunities in
off-seasons from other sports.
LACROSSE
“So how do we get started?”
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New Start Program
– The New Start Program is not a program; rather it is a free resource for both members
and non-members of US Lacrosse. It provides all of the necessary tools, resources, and
information you need to launch lacrosse in your area. Simply apply online to receive
immediate access to these materials. Visit www.uslacrosse.org/newstart to learn
more about the program.
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US Lacrosse Regional Chapters
– Connect one of our 64 regional volunteer-based US Lacrosse boards for assistance,
information and even grant assistance specific to your location. Most up-to-date
contact list at www.uslacrosse.org/chapters
LACROSSE
“What about equipment?”
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Outfitting boys’ and girls’ lacrosse teams costs less than football or ice hockey.
– Boys’ lacrosse: Helmets, shoulder pads, rib pads, arm pads, gloves and mouth guards
required. Approximately $250- $400 per player.
– Girls’ lacrosse: Protective eyewear and mouth guard mandatory, gloves optional;
required only for goalkeeper: full protective equipment, including a chest and throat
protector. Approximately $125-$175 per player.
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First Stick Program: The ultimate grassroots initiative for new and developing youth (U19 and
below) lacrosse teams nationwide, this program is designed to deliver comprehensive USL
developmental and safety resources, equipment, USL membership and coach training to
awarded teams.
– More can be found at www.uslacrosse.org/firststick
– Application available on www.uslacrosse.org in April with a submission
deadline of July 1.
LACROSSE
“What about coaches?”
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Coaches’ Education Program
– Online Courses: Interactive coaches’ resource to teach new/developing coaches
philosophy, skills and strategies for boys’ or girls’ lacrosse. Free to all current USL
members, available 24 hours a day through www.uslacrosse.org.
– Instructional Clinics: These clinics provide the hands-on, in-person interaction based on
the knowledge you received from the course. For a schedule and to learn more please
visit, CEP Clinic page on www.uslacrosse.org.
– Level 1 Certification: A nationally recognized certification program that offers lacrosse
coaches baseline, sport-specific training in order to provide the most effective, safe and
enjoyable playing environment for participants. Level 1 certification components include
completion of:
• CEP Level 1 Online Course and CEP Level 1 Instructional Clinic
• PCA Double Goal Coach 1 Course
• Background check through National Center for Safety Initiatives
LACROSSE
“What about coaches?”
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Sportsmanship Matching Grant: USL and the Positive Coaching Alliance (PCA) have
partnered to make lacrosse a positive, character building experience for every athlete. This
program provides matching grants to deliver PCA workshops to help organizations educate
their coaches, officials, athletes and fans on honoring the game. For more information, visit
http://www.uslacrosse.org/TopNav2Right/ProgramsGrants/PositiveCoachingAlliance.aspx
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US Lacrosse Convention: 5,000 coaches, officials and administrators come together annually
in January to expand their knowledge at the largest and most comprehensive educational
and networking event in the lacrosse world. Appropriate for all levels of coaching: youth,
high school, collegiate and post-collegiate. Visit www.uslacrosse.org/convention to learn
more.
LACROSSE
“What about officials?”
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Men’s and Women’s Officials Education & Training Programs: USL develops and maintains
the national standards and training programs for the certification of men’s game and
women’s game officials at all levels.
– Online Courses: Developed in 2012, each course will take the learner through the basics
of foul recognition in each game.
– Resources such as videos, manuals and senior officials’ mentorship programs
– Instructional Clinics: A platform of nationwide USL clinics offer men’s and women’s
game Officials on and off field education, training and evaluation.
– Scholarship Programs: Awards scholarships to deserving Official recipients to subsidies
the travel and registration costs associated with attending the USL National Convention.
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Resources for Recruiting and Retaining Officials: Resources such as a free publication to help
programs and leagues around the country plan for and secure lacrosse officials; available
through www.uslacrosse.org/officialstraining
LACROSSE
“What’s available to help new players?”
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US National Teams Clinic: Youth and high school players learn from the world’s elite
players—members of the US Lacrosse-coordinated Men’s and Women’s National Teams—
annually at sites across the country
Online tips at www.uslacrosse.org and www.LaxMagazine.com
Skill and training tips in Lacrosse Magazine
Keeper of Lacrosse Project: An educational and cultural initiative to preserve and promote
the core values of lacrosse. Visit www.uslacrosse.org/keeper for more info and to sign up.
– Play in the spirit of the game
– Embrace traditions
– Promote the virtues of honor, integrity and respect
– Inspire and encourage acts of good sportsmanship
– Value the importance of teamwork
– Own the responsibility and connection to the greater community
US LACROSSE
Membership Benefits
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Lacrosse Magazine – 12 issues
Insurance
Staff Support/Information Center
Discounts on products
Partnership Benefits
Access to grants and educational programs
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Access to Special Events
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Physical Education Curriculum
First Stick equipment grants
Coaches Education and Officials Training
US Lacrosse Convention for coaches, officials and administrators
Lacrosse festivals and competitions
Regional Chapter Network
Specific Benefits by Member Category
Resource Material Discounts
www.uslacrosse.org
www.laxmagazine.com
And more!
Your Team
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Put your team name as the title and explain what you have done already to help form this
team such as: developing your mission, vision, and goals; securing some or all of necessary
funding, player interest and leadership, trained coaches and officials; creating a board and
booster club. Also provide participation statistics fro the team if applicable, and what you
anticipate future growth to be.
Funding and Support for this team
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Explain how you will fund and support the cost of this team with recommendations and
ideas from the New Start manual
US Lacrosse and Community Support
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Explain how you will use the support of US Lacrosse, your local US Lacrosse Chapter and any
other outside support such as sponsors to start and support your team. See the information
about US Lacrosse Chapters in your New Start manual.
Proposed Timeline
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You’ll want to show that you are organized and have a plan for forming your team. Present a
proposed timeline of events (including due dates for registration, recruiting coaches, meeting
dates, fundraising events etc and a proposed game schedule.
School Support
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Explain what you will now need from the school and/or town-remember make it as easy as
possible to say yes!
Acknowledgements
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Be sure to thank the proper people for their time, for listening and for their consideration, and
others who have helped you get started. Be sure to also list your contact information at the
end of the presentation.

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