Assessments

Report
Race To The Top
20th Century Education
vs.
21st Century Education
Deliverable #1
NYS Common Core
Learning Standards
NYS ELA Common Core
Learning Standards
Summarized Objectives in ELA for the Next Six
Months are:
•Materials:
Shift in what students are reading – within existing materials
Reading lists include a balance of literature and informational
text
•Teachers:
Shift in student questions
Shift to 80% of questions asked as text-dependent
•Students:
Evidence of close reading
Close encounters with sufficiently complex text demonstrated
through writing to inform or argue using evidence from text.
NYS Mathematics
Common Core
Learning Standards
Summarized Objectives in Mathematics for the
Next Six Months are:
•Materials:
Focus
Clear indication of fewer concepts at each grade level
represented by curriculum documents, district formative
assessments
•Teachers:
Identify focus areas and fluencies of grade level
Shift in time spent on areas of in-depth instruction
•Students:
Demonstrated fluency and understanding
Display fluencies for the grade level and understand focus
areas
Deliverable #2
What is Data-Driven
Instruction
THE FOUR KEYS
Data-Driven Instruction at its Essence:
Assessments
Analysis
Action
in a Data-Driven Culture
ASSESSMENT BIG IDEAS:
Standards (and objectives) are meaningless
until you define how to assess them.
Because of this, assessments are the
starting point for instruction, not the end.
ASSESSMENTS:
PRINCIPLES
FOR
EFFECTIVE ASSESSMENTS
COMMON INTERIM:
• At least quarterly
• Common across all teacher of the same grade level
TRANSPARENT STARTING
POINT
• Teachers see the assessments in advance
• The assessment define roadmap for teaching
ASSESSMENTS:
PRINCIPLES
FOR
EFFECTIVE ASSESSMENTS
ALIGNED TO:
• To state test (format, content & length)
• To instructional sequence (curriculum)
• To college –ready expectations
RE-ASSESSES
• Standards that appear on the first interim assessment
appear again on subsequent interim assessments.
THE FOUR KEYS
Assessments
(Interim, Transparent, Aligned, Re-Assess)
Analysis
Action
in a Data-Driven Culture
ANALYSIS:
• IMMEDIATE: Ideal 48 hours, max 1 week turnaround
• USER-FRIENDLY: data reports are short but include
analysis at question level, standards level and overall
• TEACHER-OWNED analysis
• TEST-IN-HAND analysis: teacher & instructional leader
together
• DEEP: moves beyond “what” to “why”
Unit and Lesson Planning
Aligned with state standards
curriculum materials
Delivery of Instruction
Teachers orchestrate learning
experiences for students
Formative Assessments:
Teachers check for student understanding
minute by minute, day by day
Interim Assessments
More formal testing, usually quarterly to
check for student proficiency
Data Analysis
Teachers look at interim assessment results, plan
improvements, and identify struggling students
Follow-Up
Teachers re-think, re-teach and get extra help for
student who need it
Summative Assessments
Unit tests, grades, and high-stakes state tests
THE FOUR KEYS
Assessments
(Interim, Transparent, Aligned, Re-Assess)
Analysis
(Quick, User-friendly, Teacher-owned,
Test-in-hand, Deep)
Action
in a Data-Driven Culture
ACTION:
• PLAN: new lessons based on data analysis
• ACTION PLAN: implement what you plan (dates, times,
standards & specific strategies
• ONGOING ASSESSMENT: in-the-moment checks for
understanding to ensure progress
• ACCOUNTABILITY: observe changes in lesson plans,
classroom observations, in-class assessment
• ENGAGED STUDENTS: know end goal, how they did, and
what actions they’re taking to improve
THE FOUR KEYS
Assessments
(Interim, Transparent, Aligned, Re-Assess)
Analysis
(Quick, User-friendly, Teacher-owned,
Test-in-hand, Deep)
Action
(Action Plan, Ongoing, Accountability, Engaged)
in a Data-Driven Culture
BIG PICTURE
Data drives good teaching.
The name of the game is to …
Match the right strategy…
At the right time…
With the right student …
And to repeat this process for all students all the time.
DATA-DRIVEN CULTURE:
• ACTIVE LEADERSHIP
TEAM: teacher-leader data analysis
meetings; maintain focus
• INTRODUCTORY PD: what (assessments) and how
(analysis and action)
• CALENDAR: done in advance with built-in time for
assessment, analysis, and action (flexible)
DATA-DRIVEN CULTURE:
• ONGOING PD: aligned with data-driven calendar: flexible
to adapt to student learning needs
• BUILD
BY BORROWING: Identify and implement best
practices from high-achieving teachers and schools
THE FOUR KEYS
Assessments
(Interim, Transparent, Aligned, Re-Assess)
Analysis
(Quick, User-friendly, Teacher-owned,
Test-in-hand, Deep)
Action
(Action Plan, Ongoing, Accountability, Engaged)
in a Data-Driven Culture
(Leadership, PD, Calendar, Build by Borrowing)
Implementation
Rubric Data-Driven
Instruction &
Assessment
EngageNY.org
Questions
Deliverable #3
Teacher Evaluation
Road Map: 2011-12
WISDOM OF PRACTICE
• Imagine you are in the classroom of a highly effective
teacher
o What would you see?
o What would you hear?
o What would the students be doing or saying?
• Individually, write one idea per post-it note.
NYSUT Rubrics
NYSUT Rubrics
NY STATE STANDARDS OF VOCABULARY
NYSUT Rubrics
PLANNING AND PREPARATION
(PRE-OBSERVATION)
• Standard 1: Knowledge of Students & Student Learning
o Knowledge of child development
o Knowledge of research…
o Knowledge of diverse learning needs
o Knowledge of individual students
o Knowledge of economic, social
o Knowledge of technological literacy…
• Standard 2: Knowledge of Content & Instructional Planning
o Knowledge of content…
o Connect concepts across disciplines…
o Uses a broad range of instructional strategies
o Establishes goals & expectations
o Designs instruction
o Evaluate / utilize resources
NYSUT Rubrics
INSTRUCTION
(OBSERVATION)
• Standard 3: Instructional Practice
o Research-based practices
o Communicates clearly…
o High expectations…
o Variety of instructional… to engage student
o Engage students in multi-disciplinary skills
o Monitor and assess progress
NYSUT Rubrics
CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT
(OBSERVATION)
• Standard 4: The Learning Environment
o Creates a respectful, safe and supportive environment
o Creates an intellectually stimulating environment
o Manages the learning environment
o Organize and utilize available resources (e.g. physical
space, time, technology…)
• Standard 5: Assessment for Student Learning
o Range of assessment tools
o Understand, analyze, use data for differentiation*
o Communicates assessment system*
o Reflect upon assessment system and adjust*
o Prepare students for assessments
* - assessed through “multiple measures”
NYSUT Rubrics
PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
(POST-OBSERVATION)
• Standard 6: Professional Responsibilities
oUpholds standards and policies
o Collaborate with colleagues
o Communicate & collaborate with families
o Perform non-instructional duties
o Complies with laws and polices
NYSUT Rubrics
PROFESSIONAL GROWTH
(POST-OBSERVATION & ONGOING)
• Standard 7: Professional Growth
o Reflect on practice
o Set goals for professional development
o Communicate and collaborate to improve practice
o Remain current in knowledge of content and pedagogy
NYSUT Rubrics
ALIGNING EVIDENCE TO THE
NYSED TEACHING FRAMEWORK
•Using the placemat for the NYSED Teaching Framework,
re-sort your table’s post-it notes as appropriate to the
standard, element and indicator
NYSUT Rubrics
Paired Verbal Fluency
Building the Plane
REVIEWING THE LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE:
• Read the descriptors for the elements in
Standard 3 of the rubric
• Highlight the verbs/phrases that distinguish the differences
among the levels of performance.
Charlotte Danielson
A Framework for Teaching
PRIORITIES OF THE FFT-BASED RUBRICS
• Cognitive Engagement
• Constructivist Learning
• 21st Century Skills
The LEARNING is done by the LEARNER!
NYSUT Rubrics
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE AND STUDENT
ACHIEVEMENT – RESEARCH
Research Findings from Cincinnati
(National Bureau of Economic Research, 2010)
•Teachers have substantial effect on student achievement
•Correlation between FFT based evaluation and student
achievement
•Evaluation using the FFT found:Unsatisfactory and Basic:
students had lower gains than expected
•Proficient: students made expected gains
•Distinguished: students made positive, and greater than
expected gains
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_ id= 1565963
NYSUT Rubrics
PRIORITIES OF THE FRAMEWORK
•Cognitive Engagement
•“Effective” = students must be cognitively engaged
•“Highly Effective” = cognition, meta-cognition, and student
ownership of their learning
•Constructivist Learning
•Effective and Highly Effective practice must have evidence
of learning experiences designed to facilitate students’
construction of knowledge.
•21st Century Skills
•Effective and Highly Effective practice must plan for and
have evidence of application of college career-readiness
skills and dispositions
NYSUT Rubrics
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE
Unsatisfactory / Ineffective – Teaching shows evidence of
not understanding the concepts underlying the component may represent practice that is harmful - requires intervention
Basic / Developing– Teaching shows evidence of knowledge
and skills related to teaching - but inconsistent performance
NYSUT Rubrics
LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE
Proficient / Effective – Teaching shows evidence of
thorough knowledge of all aspects of the profession. Students
are engaged in learning. This is successful, accomplished,
professional, and effective teaching.
Distinguished / Highly Effective – Classroom functions as
a community of learners with student assumption of
responsibility for learning.
NYSUT Rubrics
COMPARISON OF HEDI LEVELS
•Compare III.2 from the NYSUT Rubric to 3a of the Framework
for Teaching Rubric
•Are there common themes?
•Are there differences?
COMMON THEMES
• Equity
• Cultural competence
• High expectations
• Developmental appropriateness
• A focus on individuals, including those with special needs
• Appropriate use of technology
• Student assumption of responsibility
NYSUT Rubrics
ENGAGEMENT IN ACTION
Video observation:
• Observe what students are doing that shows evidence of
cognitive engagement, constructing meaning, or
college-readiness.
• Collect evidence from the video, be prepared to share your
evidence later.
NYSUT Rubrics
7th Grade Language Arts
OBSERVING EVALUATION IN PRACTICE
The dos and don’ts
NYSUT Rubrics
TEACHER EVALUATION PROPOSES
•Quality Assurance
•Professional Learning – Improving teacher quality
NYSUT Rubrics
THREE “GATES” FOR
EFFECTIVE TEACHER EVALUATION
• Fairness
• Reliability
• Validity
NYSUT Rubrics
BEST PRACTICES IN OBSERVING
NYSUT Rubrics
EVIDENCE
•Evidence is a factual reporting of events.
•It may include teacher and student actions and/or
behaviors.
•It may also include artifacts prepared by the teacher,
students, or others.
•It is not clouded with personal opinion or biases.
•It is selected using professional judgment by the observer
and / or the teacher.
NYSUT Rubrics
TYPES OF OBSERVATION EVIDENCE
• Verbatim scripting of teacher or student comments:
“Bring your white boards, markers and erasers to the
carpet and sit on your square.”
• Non-evaluative statements of observed teacher or
student behavior:
Teacher presented the content from the front of room.
• Numeric information about time, student participation,
resource use, etc.:
[9:14 – 9:29] Warm-up. 8 of 22 Ss finished at 9:20, sat
still until 9:29
•An observed aspect of the environment:
Desks were arranged in groups of four with room to walk
between each group.
NYSUT Rubrics
EVIDENCE VS. OPINION
• Read each statement. Decide – is it evidence or opinion?
• Discuss your answer with your elbow partner.
• If you agree that the statement is an opinion, reword the
statement so that it is an evidence statement.
• When finished, determine the domain and standard for each
statement.
• Be prepared to discuss some of the statements, or
statements about which you have questions.
NYSUT Rubrics
WHAT IS EVIDENCE? REVIEW
• Actions, by teacher or students
• Statements or questions, by teacher or students
• Observable features of the classroom
• Review the evidence collected previously – is it evidence?
Or opinion?
NYSUT Rubrics
BIAS
Definition:
Attaching positive or negative meaning to elements in our
environment based on personal or societal influences that
shape our thinking.
A biased judgment is based on outside influences and is not
necessarily related to a teacher’s effectiveness.
• Example: “Mrs. T does so much for the school, she is an
excellent teacher. “
• The actual classroom evidence may not support the
rating of the teacher as “excellent.”
NYSUT Rubrics
BIAS IN AN EDUCATIONAL SETTING
• Imagine that you are the parent of a school age child. You
are walking down the hall of your child’s school while classes
are in session. The doors to several rooms are open and you
have the opportunity to look in on teachers.
• What would cause you to think favorably about what you saw
and what would cause you to think negatively? Use the
space provided in your materials to write your response.
NYSUT Rubrics
OTHER THREATS TO OBSERVER ACCURACY
• Assessor bias
• Leniency
• Central Tendency
• “Halo” or “Horns” Effect
NYSUT Rubrics
INDIVIDUAL PROFESSIONAL BIAS
Reflection:
• As your reflect upon your individual and group responses to
these activities, make your own personal list of biases to be
aware of when you assess teaching performance.
• List your biases in or around the yield sign to remind you not
to yield to them when evaluating performance.
• Determine if the bias leads you to assign a higher or lower
rating when evaluating teacher performance.
NYSUT Rubrics
UNDERSTANDING YOUR OWN BIAS
NYSUT Rubrics
THE EVIDENCE CYCLE
NYSUT Rubrics
OBSERVING PRACTICE
• Observe the video
• Collect evidence of Standard 3: Instruction
• With a partner, sort your evidence so that it aligns with the
appropriate criteria in your rubric for instruction
• Be prepared to share your evidence
NYSUT Rubrics
2nd Grade Mathematics
CHECKING EVIDENCE
• Use the self-check questions to review your evidence
collection
 Have I recorded only facts?
 Is my evidence relevant to the criteria being examined?
 Whenever possible, have I quantified words such as few,
some, and most?
 Have I used quotation marks when quoting a teacher or
student?
 Does my selection or documentation of evidence indicate
any personal or professional preferences?
 Have I included any opinion (in the guise of fact)?
NYSUT Rubrics
THE COMPLEXITY OF TEACHING
“After 30 years of doing such work, I have concluded that
classroom teaching … is perhaps the most complex, most
challenging, and most demanding, subtle, nuanced, and
frightening activity that our species has ever invented. ..The
only time a physician could possibly encounter a situation of
comparable complexity would be in the emergency room of a
hospital during or after a natural disaster.”
Lee Shulman, The Wisdom of Practice
NYSUT Rubrics
A CULTURE OF PROFESSIONAL INQUIRY
• Professional learning never ends.
• It is every teacher’s responsibility to engage in professional
development.
• Teaching is so complex that it is never done perfectly.
• Every educator can always become more skilled. Making a
commitment to do so is part of the essential work of
teaching.
Charlotte Danielson
The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice
NYSUT Rubrics
A CULTURE OF PROFESSIONAL INQUIRY SHOULD
• Infuse a school’s practices related to professional
development;
• Be reflected in the school’s practices surrounding mentoring
and teacher evaluation; and
• Regard mentoring and evaluation as ongoing learning.
Charlotte Danielson
The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice
NYSUT Rubrics
TEACHER EVALUATION …
“Teacher evaluation can be an opportunity for genuine
professional learning. When organized around clearly
established and accepted standards of practice, teacher
evaluation offers an opportunity for educators to reflect
seriously on their practice, and promote learning.”
Charlotte Danielson
The Handbook for Enhancing Professional Practice
NYSUT Rubrics
Back to School
Reflection
Questions & Conclusions
• RTTT
o Common Core
o Data Driven Instruction
o APPR

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