Social Entrepreneurship

Report
SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
GRAMEEN & OTHER BEST PRACTICES
By: Mark Thornton & Marina Kusumawardhani
ABOUT
Generation Social: Social Entrepreneurship
Academy
 Mission:
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Social entrepreneurship/business training
Fund mobilization
Focus: youth & women
Public awareness!
US-based company;
founded 2012 in Vienna.
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ABOUT (2)
Social Entrepreneurship best-practices
 Expert Team
 Youth:
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Creativity
Leadership
Community:
Demand-driven
 Experiential
 Engagement
 Partnership with stakeholders

Fund mobilization
 Organizational transformation

GEN Y

Which generation are you?
GEN Y (2)
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The way we work/produce in
the future => new trends
New work-force globally: 2,3
billions
Work method:
 Immediate
achievement +
appreciation
 Impatient/anxious
 No hierarchy
 Success = joy and fun
 Time/place flexibility
Keywords: digital, collective
mindset, sharing,
participation, collaboratively,
WIP, learning new skills
Engaging
(professionalism)

Purpose

Passion + job
=> 54% entrepreneurs!
PHILOSOPHY
Private Sector – Citizen Sector
 Capitalism – Socialism => equal chance/opportunity
 Transformation from inside + financial sustainability

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Vision
Identify and recognize social problems
=> social change
 Using entrepreneurial principles to
create social venture
 Performance = profit + social return
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History
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Literature 1960s
Michael Young 1950s: more than
sixty social enterprise (“world’s most
successful social entrepreneur” –
Harvard)
“In my case, I like to
support causes where "a
lot of good comes from a
little bit of good," or, in
other words, where the
positive social returns
vastly exceed the amount
of time and money
invested.”
ASHOKA
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Founded 1981 by Bill Drayton
Identify and support social entrepreneurs
through social venture capital
Goal: citizen sector  business sector
Operate in > 70 countries, >2000 SEs,
“Youth Venture” => invests in team of young
people
11 out of 30 Forbes’ under 30 SEs
James Whelton (Coder Dojo): 10,000 kids in 22
countries
 Sejal Hathi: 3 enterprises to help young girls in
>100 countries
 Hugh Evans: 2012 Global Citizen concert in
Central Park

“Social entrepreneurs will not be
content by giving a fish or teaching
how to fish; they will not stop until
they revolutionize the whole fishing
industry.”
GRAMEEN BANK
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Founded 1976
27$ from own pocket for 42
women
Today: $11,35 billion, >8
million borrowers
68% crosses line of poverty (19
thousand out of 111tsd
beggars)
95% return rate
Social business: 97% by
borrowers, 3% by government.
Youth: social business is 70%
creativity.
“Whenever I see
problems in the
society, I create
business out of it.”
ACUMEN/SKOLL/BAREFOOT
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Acumen Fund:
 Global venture fund for entrepreneurial approaches
 Jacqueline Novogratz (2001). Seed Capital from Rockefeller, Cisco
Systems, philanthropists.
 Patient capital – loans or equity, not grants
 $83 million investments (2012), in 46 enterprises (100 million people and
created 58000 jobs)
Skoll Foundation:
 Social entrepreneurship foundation
 Jeff Skoll (eBay) (1999)
 Investing in, connecting & celebrating SEs
 Invests through annual Skoll Award for SE
 Media projects: Uncommon Heroes short films
 Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford Uni, international
forum and conferences
ACUMEN/SKOLL/BAREFOOT (2)
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Barefoot College:
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Voluntary organization => empowerment
& sustainability
Founded 1972, Bunker Roy
3000 children attending 150 night
schools, trained >3 million people for jobs
Gandhi philosophy: each village being
self-reliant (medical, energy, etc)
Solar systems to illiterate poor women
=> no degree
Partners with UNESCO and UNDP for
solar training replication
Formulas for change!
Individuals
Network
Funding
 Replication/best-practices
 Media/recognition
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“We went to Ladakh … and
we asked this woman, ‘What
was the benefit you had
from solar electricity?’ And
she thought for a minute
and said, ‘It’s the first time I
can see my husband’s face in
winter.’”
INTEGRATION INTO DEVELOPMENT
PROJECTS
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Sustainability:
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Market/feasibility studies:
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Sense of belonging
Cultural sensitivity and
awareness
Business model:
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Initial investment:
affordability of individual
projects
Payback plan
Aid/grant vs. investment
No monitoring =>
involvement of local private
companies, or local NGOs
Price competition model
Cash flow models
Revenue model: grid, CDM,
etc
=> Entrepreneurship
Awareness
& Market
Study
UN
Mission
Development
Project
Business
Models
Investment
INTEGRATION INTO DEVELOPMENT
PROJECTS (2)
Innovative
Business Models
Price Competition
Local Capacity
Building
Sustainable Financial
incentives
Project Design
Investment & Private
Sector Participation
Energy Entrepreneurs
Business Skills
Independent Power
Producer
Business Partnerships
Rural Energy
Enterprises
RRE
Strategic
Outcome 2
RRE
Strategic
Outcome 1
RRE
Strategic
Outcome 3
INTEGRATION INTO DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS (3)
Planning Stage
Identify
Interest
Organizing
Stage
Implement
-ing
Stage
Management
Agreement
Settingup RES
Investment/
Loan
Agreement
Staffing
Government
Inducement
Identify
Energy Needs
Feasib
ility
Study
Identify
Energy Price
Structure
Monitoring
Stage
Evaluation
Business Plan
Identify
Employment
Identify
Fuel
Social Entrepreneurship Capacity Building
Business
Implementa
tion
Technical Capacity Building
Payback
Monitoring
INVESTMENT SCHEME
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•
Challenges:
 Involving /engaging FIs and
partners,
 Knowledge and awareness,
 Beyond project duration.
Looking for innovative projects for
renewable energy enterprises:
 Evidence based
 Replication of success stories
3 topics: IT/business –social
entrepreneurship/renewable
energy.
Question: how to engage private
sector?? => high investment
return
Support of conventions, advocates,
to back UN agencies to
Government Egypt example
INVESTMENT SCHEME (2)
Government
• Investment
2011:
257 billion USD
• SE4ALL
(in Rio 20+):
>50 billion USD
Fund/Donor
Organization (GEF)
UN Agencies
Financial
Institutions/
/Development Bank
Social
Business
Community
Create Green
industry & job
Value
Generation
MDG REALIZATION POTENTIAL
Concrete Deliverables through Projects
Portfolio by the end of 2018
GSSB – Bangladesh (in 10
years)
Number of people gaining access to
energy: >150,000
Number of people gaining access to
energy: 8 million
Renewable energy capacity installed:
~25MW
Renewable energy capacity installed:
55 MW
Renewable energy generated: > 450
GWh/year
Renewable energy generated: 87
GWh/year
Million tons of CO2eq avoided: >7
million tons direct
Million tons of CO2eq avoided:
68,000 tonnes/year
Number of SMEs benefitting from
projects: >600
Number of SMEs (Micro-utlity) from
projects: 3395
64 out of 64 districts, 50,000 villages
=> Green Sustainable Country
SHS 1,066,487 (>23500 SHSs/ mo), ICS:
619,734, Biogas: 24,798
Total employees: 12,521 (16,500 trained
technicians, 433,556 users)
CASE STUDY (Uganda Plan)
CREEC
Technical
Support
Capacity Development
UNIDO
RE Technologies
Systems/Operation/Maintenance
Agro-processing technologies
Business
Incubation and
other Support
Social
Entrepreneurship
Academy
2 Years existing Electrical
Installation Course
Training in agro-processing
Entrepreneurship and
Business Skills
Rural Energy and Agro
processing Enterprises
Finance
/Credit
Revolving
Fund
IFI/bank
EGYPT PLAN
CASE STUDY (2) (Egypt Plan)
Preparatory
Capacity
Building
Implementation and M&E
Beneficiaries
Main Actors
Existing SEs
NGOs
Community
SE
Training
Youth/SEs
Technica
l Training
Incubators
/Unis
IFIs
Endorse
ment
Monitoring
and
Evaluation
ILO
Branches
Gov’t
Concept
Note
Main Organizers
SE
&Technical
Training
GenSoc
ILO
““Dignity is more important to the human spirit
than wealth. When people gain income, they gain
choice, and that is fundamental to dignity.”
- Jacqueline Novogratz
QUESTIONS?

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