UDL Powerpoint

Report
Universal Design for Learning
Ricki Sabia
Associate Director, NDSS Policy Center
Chair, National UDL Task Force
[email protected]
1
Universal Design in Architecture

Curb Cuts

Ramps

Captions on TV

Elevators
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Easy Grip Tools
2 © CAST, Inc.
Universal Design for Learning
(UDL)
Universal Design in Architecture
– Eliminates barriers in environment
– Benefits all people, not just those with
disabilities
Universal Design for Learning
(developed by CAST see www.udlcenter.org)
– Eliminates barriers in curriculum
– Benefits all learners, not just those with
3 © CAST, Inc. disabilities
What’s better about Universal
Design?
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Recognizes the reality of diversity
Built right from the start
– Less costly than retrofits
– More efficient than individual solutions
– More aesthetic
– Benefits more people
4 © CAST, Inc.
What’s better about Universal
Design for Learning?


Recognizes the reality of diversity
Built right from the start
– More efficient than individual solutions
– Benefits more students and teachers
– Supports access to the General Education
Curriculum and General Education
Classroom.
5 © CAST, Inc.
UDL AND GRADE LEVEL
STANDARDS
6

Universal Design for Learning supports the
idea that all students should have the
opportunity to become proficient learners of
standards-based academic content.

Schools should provide multiple ways to
attain high standards, rather than lower
them.
“Universal”
7
Based on Neuroscience
8
The Three Networks
They must work together
Strategic Network
Recognition
Network
9 © CAST, Inc.
Affective Network
The Three Principles
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1. Multiple Means of Representation to
increase recognition – the “what” of learning
(Recognition Network)
2. Multiple Means of Expression to expand
strategic abilities - the “how” of learning and
demonstrating knowledge
(Strategic Network)
3. Multiple Means of Engagement to enhance
involvement - the “why” of learning
(Affective Network)
Guidelines for the Three Principles
http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines
11
© CAST, Inc.
Multiple Means of Presentation
Provide textto-speech,
video, audio,
and other
multi-media
options
12
Highlight
critical
features
& main
ideas
Provide
vocabulary
support and
background
knowledge
Integrate
assistive
technologies
into learning
environments
Multiple Means of Expression
Offer graphic
organizers and
outlines offering
multiple levels of
support
13
Provide
vocabulary
word banks to
prompt writing
ideas and
provide
spelling
support
Allow students to
do voice
recording,
graphic displays,
& performance
Multiple Means of Engagement
Vary levels of
challenge and
support to
prevent
frustration or
boredom
14
Tie work to
real-world
examples
Provide
choices
whenever
possible
Teach selfassessment
and
reflection
UDL in Practice
Apply the three principles to the four pillars of
curriculum: educational goals, materials,
methods, and assessments
This ensures all three brain networks are
engaged at the same time to optimize
learning and accurate assessment!
15
Instructional Goals
Traditional:
The means for accomplishing the goals are
interwoven into the instructional goal.
UDL:
The means for attaining the goals can be
individualized.
16
Instructional Materials
http://www.udlcenter.org/implementation/examples
http://udleditions.cast.org
Traditional:
The materials are mostly print; everyone gets
the same materials
UDL:
Use a variety of levels of printed text, digital,
video, audio materials etc.
17
Digital Examples of Materials
18© CAST, Inc. http://bookbuilder.cast.org/ also see http://udleditions.cast.org
Kurzweil
http://www.kurzweiledu.com/default.html
19
Kidspiration
http://www.inspiration.com/Kidspiration
20
Power Point
21
Don Johnston Start to Finish
http://www.donjohnston.com/products/start_to_finish/library/index.ht
ml
22
No Fear Shakespeare
http://nfs.sparknotes.com/romeojuliet/page_4.html
23
Other SparkNotes Tools
24
Teaching Methods
25
Traditional
Usually lecture style, homogenous grouping,
unsupported note-taking
UDL
 Avoid limiting presentation style.
 Use frequent questions, statements of clarification,
and solicit student participation.
 Assign students to working groups by mixed
abilities for complementary skills.
 Provide adapted materials e.g. for note-taking
Assessments
Traditional:
End-of-chapter test - multiple choice and
short essay answers using pen and pencil.
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UDL:
 Ensure test objectives match instructional
objectives
 consider alternate means of delivery,
different question format and if needed
modification of assessment content
Federal Level- UDL Task Force
www.udl4allstudents.com
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
Spearheaded by NDSS in 2006

Coalition of 41 national groups representing
general education, special education and
higher education interests

Promotes UDL in Federal policy and
legislation and disseminates information on
UDL
Results of Task Force:
UDL in Federal Policy/Legislation
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OSEP Toolkit
2007 draft House NCLB bill
Higher Education Act of 2008
House/Senate LEARN Act
Guidance on Recovery Act
National Educational Technology Plan
Administration’s Blue print for ESEA
OSEP Personnel Preparation Grants
Common Core Standards/Model Core Teaching
Standards
Race to the Top Assessments
What You Can Do:
Advocacy for UDL
National Level
 Educate your Representative and Senators
and/or their staff about UDL, including the
fact that better access to curriculum and
more accurate assessments will help schools
improve academic performance.
 Respond to alerts supporting specific UDL
legislative and regulatory language for
federal statutes such as ESEA and IDEA.
29
Advocacy for UDL
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State level (similar for local level)
 Create a coalition of stakeholders to
promote UDL
 Hold a conference on UDL.
 Inform education and legislative officials-get
UDL statute or regulations
 Encourage the development of a strategic
plan for implementing UDL
 Request that any technology plan use UDL
Maryland UDL Bill
31

Spearheaded by Maryland Down syndrome
Advocacy Coalition and Maryland State
Department of Education; supported by 34
state organizations

Created stakeholder task force for
recommendations regarding UDL in MD

Lists issues to be considered for
comprehensive implementation
Maryland Bill Case Study
http://ndss.org/images/stories/NDSSresources/pdfs/ndss%20u
dl%20template%20may%202011%20final.pdf
Provides steps taken by the NDSS Maryland
Governmental Affairs Committee (GAC) as it
worked on passing a UDL bill.
 Gives example of hurdles and process faced
in any legislative advocacy
 Provides specific information and documents
that can be used by other affiliates to move
UDL forward in their state
32
http://www.ndss.org/images/stories/pdf/UDL%20Bill
%20Template%20Appendix-lr.pdf
Key Steps in MD Template
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Develop one page summary about UDL
Communicate through website, listservs,
brochure, webinars etc.
Form a statewide stakeholder coalition
Enlist help of your State department of Ed
Find a legislative champion to help with bill
Educate legislators and get co-sponsors
Ask for local school board support
Testify at Hearings
COMPROMISE
MD UDL TASK FORCE REPORT
http://ndss.org/images/stories/NDSSresources/pdfs/
final%20udltf%20report.pdf
34

Used literature review and interviews to
affirm the effectiveness and feasibility of
implementing UDL
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Provides implementation recommendations
for the State Board of Education, State
Department of Education, school districts,
schools and higher education
UDL Principles and the IEP
Goals and Materials
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Selection of curriculum objectives per
marking period.
Homework and projects aligned to selected
objectives.
Alternate formats of textbooks, novels and
supplemental materials
Educational technology, including use of
computer for writing and for accessing
software.
Preview of instructional materials.
UDL Principles and the IEP
Teaching Methods and Assessments
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36
Class discussion questions in yes/no or
multiple choice format.
Teacher training on technology used by the
child.
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Teacher-made assessments based on
curriculum objectives, which are designed to
eliminate barriers caused by the disability.

Digital assessments

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