Lit Mat Essay Structure to print

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Longhill Literacy: Communicate Like An Expert
I am proud of my work
because ……..
I have written clearly so that
my reader can understand
my writing easily
Have I used different sentence types?
Simple sentences
Compound sentences
A simple sentence contains a subject and a verb and can
contain an object.
Eg. The Bunsen burner was very hot.
A compound sentence is two or more simple sentences joined
together by the words and, but, or.
Eg. Henry VIII was an English king and he had six wives.
Complex sentences
Communication
I have checked my spelling
and corrected any errors
A complex sentence is one idea with a development.
In other words, it is a simple sentence (main clause) with something extra added on (subordinate clause). A subordinate clause
provides extra information but does not make sense on it own. Complex sentences contain a conjunction such as because, since,
after, although or when.
Types of Complex Sentences
I have used correct
punctuation & grammar
I have divided my work into
appropriate paragraphs
My writing is suitable for the
audience I am writing for
I have used reasons and
evidence to support my
points/arguments
Main clause
first
The cat is
asleep on
the mat
although it
is usually
very active.
Subordinate
clause first
Embedded
clause
Fronted
adverbial
Although it
is usually
very active,
the cat is
asleep on
the mat.
The cat,
who is lazy,
is asleep
on the mat
Under the
table, the
lazy cat is
asleep on
the mat.
Starting
with a ‘ly’
word
Lazily, the
cat is
asleep on
the mat
Staring
with an
‘ing’ word
Sighing as
he woke,
the lazy cat
got off the
mat.
LINKING IDEAS
`
Connectives are words and phrases that help to link ideas together. You can use connectives to link ideas within a sentence or link ideas in separate sentences or paragraphs
Adding Information
Useful words for
Generalisers for
Giving Examples
Sequencing/Time
Signalling a similar Signalling a different Useful phrases for
introducing opinions referring to groups
point of view
point of view
conclusion
of people
for example, such as,
next, then, firstly,
equally, in the same
however, whereas,
in conclusion,
and, also, as well as,
believe, think that,
all, everyone, most,
for instance, as
secondly, finally, lastly,
way, similarly,
instead of
having considered all
moreover, too, in
suggest, claim,
some, many, a few,
revealed by, in the
meanwhile, after,
likewise, as with, like,
alternatively,
the arguments,
addition, additionally,
state
lots of people, the vast case of, as illustrated
overall, before, in
in comparison with
otherwise, unlike, on
looking at this from
furthermore
majority, a significant by, suggesting shows
conclusion
the other hand, it
both sides, there is
minority
could be argued that
much to be said for
….
both viewpoints
Longhill Literacy: Communicate Like An Expert
Common Command Words
ESSAY ORGANISATION
Describe
Give a clear description that includes all the relevant
features,, (including figure, names etc. where
appropriate).
Remember to write in paragraphs
Use the 3 T’s to remind you to start a new paragraph
T = Topic
T
= Time
T = Talk
Explain
Set out in detail the meaning of something, with reasons.
Examples are normally part of the explanation.
When you are writing an essay – remember to:
1. Always start with an introduction which addresses the question.
2. Finish the essay with a conclusion which summarises the main points of your essay/argument
and addresses the essay title again
3. Use connectives in each paragraph to link ideas and put them in a logical order.
It is important to develop your paragraphs properly:
• Start with a topic sentence which is the first sentence of a paragraph that tells the reader what the
paragraph is about
• Now add some developing sentences to develop your ideas and add details to the topic sentence.
You should be aiming to include at least three developing sentences in each paragraph
• Don’t forget to link your ideas (see above and over for examples of connectives)
E
POINT
EVIDENCE
• What point are you trying • If relevant, select a short
to make?
quote from the text that
• What ideas are you
supports your point.
wanting to express?
DON’T
FORGET
THE BASICS
`
use ‘ ’ not ’
I use a full stop
when I’m writing at the end of
about myself.
every sentence.
E
Summarise
Write down briefly the main points or essential features.
Compare
Identify the main factors that apply in two or more
situations and explain the similarities or advantages.
Contrast
Identify the main factors that apply in two or more
situations and explain the differences or disadvantages.
Evaluate
Review the information then form a conclusion giving
evidence for each view or statement.
Using PEEL to structure your essay
P
Analyse
Identify separate factors, say how they are related and
how each one contributes.
L
EXPLAIN –
LINK
ANALYSE THE EVIDENCE • Link ideas within and
- Analyse key words from
across paragraphs (use
your evidence
appropriate connectives)
- What is further revealed • Make sure you have
about the meaning?
linked your answer to
the original question
asked
I use a capital
I use a capital
letter at the start letter for names
of every
and places.
sentence.
Justify
Give reasons or evidence to support an opinion or point
of view. To illustrate how a conclusion has been formed.
Assess
Make a judgment on the importance of something –
similar to evaluate.
I use
for a place,
when something belongs to
someone &
for ‘they
are’.
I use an apostrophe I don’t use an
when shortening a apostrophe for
word.
words that are
plural.

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