GSO

Report
We are guests of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) in its headquarters
The first “stakeholder” was Papa Leone X, in favour of his brother Giuliano de’ Medici, then it
was purchased by the Lante family of Pisa, who invested in its “upgrades” to acquire “roman”
character while integrating with the roman aristocracy (della Rovere, Orsini, Borghese, Massimo)
Cooperation for Implementation of
Global Research Infrastructure
Group of Senior Officials (GSO)
Prof. Giorgio Rossi,
Physics Department, Università di Milano and ESFRI
Chair of 2014 meeting of GSO
previous GSO results
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GSO agreed by ministers in 2008 to improve
collaboration on GRIs (G8+N with Rotating Chair)
Broad mandate to improve cooperation in GRIs
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GSO Framework of principles and criteria for enabling
collaboration to implement a GRI
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Questionnaires to identify candidate projects of global
scientific interest that are potentially compatible with the
Framework
Objective of the 5th GSO meeting - 1
• Analyse the 39 responses to the questionnaire
• Identify the main motivations and expectations of full
internationalization of these projects
• Visit the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory of the INFN
and discuss with the management the possible evolution
from"national research infrastructure with international
scope" to GRI.
• Identify areas of promising collaboration, priorities and
formats
Objective of the 5th GSO meeting - 3
• The GSO will discuss on the complementarity and possible
synergies with other on-going international actions on
Research Infrastructures:
• A presentation by the OECD - Global Science Forum
• A presentation by the Data Group on the Research Data
Alliance.
Objective of the 5th GSO meeting - 4
The GSO will discuss on the issues of
• Communicating openly its results
• Extending the membership
• Defining the structure of the GSO Report 2015
• Drafting the GSO Report by the Spring 2015 to be discussed at
the 6th GSO meeting on 20-21 April 2015.
Next Steps
• Focus on some opportunities emerging strongly from the
39 GRI proposals
• Report to G8 in 2015 on GRIs ready for global cooperation
• Extend the GSO mandate to facilitate the prioritization and
implementation phase of GRIs
Actions
• Strengthening the Framework with the definition of the policy
items discussed
• Sketching a new mandate to facilitate GRI prioritization and
implementation
• Agree on issues of communication
• Agree on openness and collaboration with GSF and RDA
Round Table Presentations of SO and accompanying experts
Federico Zuccari
Peter Fletcher reports on Actions taken by
the GSO since the last meeting in
Abingdon (2013) and since the last G8
ministerial meeting in London (2013)
(15’)
Palazzo Lante
Pomarancio - Lante Palace
Analysis of responses to
the Questionnaires and of
new projects submitted
Andrea De Candido
(30’)
Jacopo Tintoretto
Senior Officials declare motivations/expectations about the proposed GRI(s)
10’ sharp !
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Australia
Brazil
Canada
People’s Republic of China
France
Germany
India
Italy
Japan
Mexico
Russian Federation
South Africa
United Kingdom
European Commission
5 projects
5 projects
4 projects
3 projects
1 project
1 project
2 projects
4 projects
3 projects
1 project
6 projects
2 projects
1 project
2 projects
Ralph Dieter
Senior Officials declare motivations/expectations about the proposed GRI(s)
10’ sharp !
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Australia
Brazil
Canada
People’s Republic of China
France
Germany
India
Italy
Japan
Mexico
Russian Federation
South Africa
United Kingdom
European Commission
5 projects
5 projects
4 projects
3 projects
1 project
1 project
2 projects
4 projects
3 projects
1 project
6 projects
2 projects
1 project
2 projects
Presentation of the Global Science Forum / OECD
Frédéric Sgard
(30’)
Giacinto Calandrucci
Presentation of the Data Group
and Research Data Alliance
Carlos Morais Pires
(15’)
Romanelli
Presentation of the structure of
the GSO Report 2015
Ralph Dieter
(15’)
Carlo Rainaldi
Senior Officials discuss policy issues as identified in the videoconference
15’ sharp !
• Promoting Access to Facilities
DE, EC, FR
• Access to Data and Data Management
Data Group/USA/MX
• Evaluation Criteria and Priorities
IT, DE, CN, CA
• Project management and Life Cycle
USA, UK, CN
• Legal Framework for GRIs
EC
Day One Conclusions
• GRI questionnaires
• Main expectations / motivations
• Synergies with GSF-OECD and RDA
• Structure of the GSO 2015 Report to G8
• Policy on Access / etc.
Day Two
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Be sure you are registered on the right return bus !
Evaluation Criteria
and Priorities
in establishing GRIs
GRI can be prompted by:
a) International agreement on urgent action for
addressing a science issue or a great challenge
b) Extension at global level of monitoring
infrastructures (oceans, solid earth, atmosphere,
solar system, infectious diseases, epidemia,
international cohorts…)
c) Adoption of GRI status of internationally used RIs.
Establishment of World Laboratories
a-type GRI case
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International science community agrees on scope and
expected discovery and demonstrates to several
Governments the benefit to operate internationally/globally.
International outlook bodies (GSF) support.
GSO informs G8+N that a GRI can be the winning solution
and carry benefits to many/all Countries.
The GRI framework is put to a stress-test.
An intergov. treaty/agreement is prepared and site selection
is discussed/negotiated. Whatrrole for GSO: fostering and
facilitating contacts (group of wide people)? Leading the
science and diplomatic approach? Acting as global reviewing
committee? Other…
b-type GRI case
The effectiveness of research requires full data sets for monitoring and properly
modelling the earth dynamics (climate, weather, desertification, ice-melting, ozone
screen…)
Evaluation of effectiveness of existing relevant regional RIs and evaluation of their
networking at global level vs. replacing technology for an altogether novel GRI.
GSO informs G8+N that a globally distributed GRI integrating the state-of-the-art
existing observatories or upgraded observatories can be the winning solution and
carry benefits to all for a sustainable cost
The GRI framework is put to a stess-test
An intergovt treaty/agreement is prepared and headquarters/data center selection are
discussed/negotiated What role of GSO towards already installed GEO SS ?
Overarching executive or steering committee ?
Organization level (CERN, ITER…) or new global RI “instruments2 (LHC for example) ?
c-type GRIs
An existing laboratory offering international access offers to
integrate more international programmes and contributions,
opening to a global governance.
The science community at large recognizes the advantages to
invest and access to that laboratory, or to federate with it
complementary facilities.
A science outlook is updated as a function of two scenarios:
the integration in a World-Laboratory dedicated to a specific
objective (physics, genomics, space, energy…) vs. maintaining
independent dispersed efforts. Conclusions are reached on
necessity/opportunity/sustainability of the different options
The GRI framework is put to a stress-test
Evaluation Criteria in establishing
GRIs
The Global dimension must be a clear added value, or a precondition for the research results
(Time and money value)
The GRI must substitute or complement/coordinate the
national/regional on-going efforts and allow to reach an overall
sustainable cost and increase of return from investment
The GRI must offer data and results of paramount interest and,
under proper policy, of open access to foster scientific knowledge
and innovation skills for societal and economical actions.
Priority Criteria in establishing GRIs
The GRI concept will be prioritized by the readiness of the
proponents and supporting governments (national strategies)
A pragmatic approach shall be adopted as a GRI system will
require time and trials to become an effective reality
A priority would be set by the agreement on the grand
challenges. Lower priority will be given to projects that overlap
in scope with existing GRIs.
Clear acceptance by the world scientific community and
recognition of global sustainability by a critical mass of
Governments will be priority elements.
EPOS – European Plate Observing System
Integrates Solid Earth Science research
infrastructures for seamless access to
pan-European data and services
Guarantees open access to data and
services for cross-disciplinary and
transnational research
Fosters scientific, technological and ICT
innovation for successfully addressing
global Grand Challenges
in Earth science
Improves geo-hazard assessment,
risk mitigation, and sustainable
management of georesources
for a safe and prosperous society
EPOS – European Plate Observing System
EPOS involves and integrates a large number of diverse
infrastructures and communities in Solid Earth Science
The EPOS federated approach aims at increasing their efficiency,
improving and simplifying their use, and allowing multilateral
strategic coordination for their
sustainability, operation, and development
EPOS – European Plate Observing System
EPOS will offer to diverse communities data products, tools, and
services for intelligible integrated analyses
Accessible data and new e-infrastructures bring
novel cross-fertilization of ideas and lead to innovative research,
new discoveries and applications for society
www.mousephenotype.org
Thousands of registered users world-wide; gene knockout mice shipped to thousands of
laboratories for in-depth research. Over 3,500 IMPC mouse strains have been produced, with
phenotype data for 1500 of these strains available already. Another 16,000 genes to be
www.mousephenotype.org
completed over the next 7 years.
Monterotondo Mouse Clinic (MMC)
The Monterotondo Mouse Clinic is the
Italian partner of the International
Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC).
Today: >100 open access users/year,
production
and
dissemination
of
requested mouse mutant models of
human diseases.
Tomorrow: full operation capacity > 350
international users/year
Open real-time web-access to IMPC
phenotypic, genotypic, disease model
data of individual mouse mutant models
www.mousephenotype.org
Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science – RIHS
Heritage preservation is a global challenge requiring global
cooperative and multidisciplinary approaches.
RIHS supports advanced research in heritage science through access
to an integrated platform of services and tools including mobile
diagnostic instruments, large scale facilities and scientific archives.
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Heritage science is founded on the interdisciplinary combination
of knowledge from arts and humanities (conservation,
archaeology, history, art history, ethics etc.), and from science and
technology (chemistry, physics, mathematics, anthropology,
biology, geology, computer sciences and engineering, etc.).
Heritage science supports the various aspects of tangible and
intangible heritage conservation, interpretation and
management.
www.iperionch.eu
Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science – RIHS
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43 institutions from 18 EU member states currently joining the
proposal for establishing RIHS in Europe. (700 users/year + 1000
virtual access users, remote access heritage datasets
>500.000/year)
More than 22 institution from all over the world already applied
to be associated to RIHS. (International potential >4-fold increase
in users)
Hosting of the legal entity proposed by the intergovernmental
organization ICCROM-International Centre for the Study of the
Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property
www.iperionch.eu
Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science – RIHS
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RIHS will result from the joining of several on-going initiatives:
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www.iperionch.eu
www.ariadne-infrastructure.eu
The Palaeoanthropology initiative was initiated by the European
Commission at the Palaeoanthropology and Cultural Heritage session
at the International Conference on Research Infrastructures, ICRI2014
(http://www.icri2014.eu/sessions/parallel-thematic- sessionspalaeoanthropology-cultural-heritage).
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CHARISMA-Cultural Heritage Advanced Research Infrastructures:
Synergy for a Multidisciplinary Approach to Conservation/
Restoration (EU FP7), www.charismaproject.eu
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Eu-ARTECH-Access, Research and Technology for the conservation
of the European Cultural Heritage (EU FP6), www.eu-artech.org
www.iperionch.eu
Research Infrastructure for Heritage Science – RIHS
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The global value and impact of RIHS as a world-wide distributed
infrastructure will benefit from the involvement of prominent
international institutions working in the field of heritage science.
International partners are seminal to introduce in their regional
ecosystems the innovations and the cutting-edge tools provided
by the global infrastructure. They are also key stakeholders in
involving local communities in study and preservation of heritage,
and play major roles in dissemination, communication, use of
best practices, standards and protocols.
Access to archives (of restoration data, scientific data, ...) is one of
the services that RIHS will provide to the research communities.
International partners involved in the infrastructure can provide
their scientific and practical knowledge with far better visibility to
scientists in the global community.
www.iperionch.eu
LNGS
• LNGS now
– National laboratory run by INFN – national governance
– addresses most pressing challenges in Astroparticle Physics
– Peer review of all research proposals by an International Scientific
Committee
– Strong international participation to research :
• 2/3 of users from international institutions (~600/900)
• Italy, Germany, USA and Russia account for 3/4 of users
• LNGS as GRI
– Broader international participation to research
– International participation to governance
– International participation to costs with cash and in-kind
contributions
Palazzo Lante
Onorio Longhi

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