Social media for beginners by M Rouprêt

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Social Media for Beginners
Morgan Rouprêt, MD, PhD
Professor of Urology
Hopital Pitié Salpétrière, Assistance Publique- Hôpitaux de Paris
Université Paris 6, Paris, France
Climate changes…
Eyjafjallajokull
Surgery changes…. Robot a new god?
fascination
adoration
Consumer
Demand
Role of the surgeon?
Popular
surgery?
EAU changes ….
European Urology changes
….
http://www.europeanurology.com/social-media
A new era of medicine…
Introduction
The main generalist social media sites are essential in any field of
professional life to DISCUSS, PROMOTE, MONITOR and ENGAGE with peers.
For researchers a number of sites have become well established as specialist
resources to CREATE, DISCOVER, SHARE, DISCUSS and MEASURE research
outputs…
7
Social media is user generated content that is shared
over the internet via technologies that promote engagement,
sharing and collaboration.*
* Definition from The Social Media Guide.com
Innovation adoption …
Percent of population
55
The Internet
Revolution
65
46
Billions of Users
21.9
http://www.itu.int/ITU-D/ict/statistics/at_glance/keytelecom.html
24.9
9.6
Social networking – 50% of all US adults
100%
80%
61%
67%
47%
40%
2006
8%
4%
1%
2007
18-29
30-49
26%
25%
33%
13%
11%
7%
2008
51%
35%
25%
20%
71%
52%
48%
49%
Pew Internet Project
83%
70%
76%
60%
9%
7%
6%
0%
2005
85%
86%
% of internet users
2009
50-64
2010
65+
2011
2012
Social media is the second Internet revolution.
Used w/ permissions GNU License
http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/File:Web_2.0_elements.png
http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/File:Web_1.0_elements.png
YOUR PATIENTS Are Using Social Media
80%of all US Adults use the internet
59% go online for health information
25% read other’s health experiences online
20% track their own health info online
18% consult online reviews
of treatments /drugs
13% go online to find
others w/ similar
conditions
•Source - Pew Internet project
3% post experience
with drug or
treatment
60% of patients say
Information found online
affected a decision
about how to treat an illness
or condition
Source - Pew Internet Project
E-PATIENTS engage in communities online to share their stories,
disease & treatment information, referrals and support
Social media sites have 24 TIMES the activity of healthcare sites
HOSPITALS are using Social
Media
1,229 US Hospitals
• 575 YouTube Channels
• 1068 Facebook pages
• 814 Twitter Accounts
• 566 LinkedIn Accounts
• 946 Four Square
• 149 Blogs
• 4,118 Hospital Social Networking Sites
http://ebennett.org/hsnl/
E-Medicine Practices
Mobile patient platform
Jay Parkinson, MD
Video Visits, Instant message visits
•
Online communication - patients can upload
BP, blood sugars, weight data for review online
•
Online appointment scheduling, refills
•
Patients pay an annual fee + low costs per visit
•
No insurance
Online, your patients TRUST YOU the most
Likely to trust
online information
from…
Likely to share
online information
from…..
61% doctor
55%
Hospital
42%
Insurer
27%
Pharma
41% doctor
39%
Hospital
34%
Insurer
28%
Pharma
Source: PwC Health Research Institute: Social Media “Likes” healthcare Chart pack
Physicians & Social Media Use
Any
Twitter
Professional
Personal
Blogs
Blogs
Google+
Linked In
Source http://www.quantiamd.com/qqcp/DoctorsPatientSocialMedia.pd
f
MD Communities
You Tube
Facebook
Percent
0
20
40
60
80
100
Why Don’t Docs Engage in Social Media?
Liability concerns (73%)
Patient privacy concerns (71%)
No way to get paid for it (41%)
Lack of time (28%)
It’s not inappropriate (20%)
Not interested (9%)
Don’t know the technology (6%)
Source - http://www.quantiamd.com/q-qcp/DoctorsPatientSocialMedia.pdf
Whether you know it or not -
Whether you like it or not 





You are Online
Information in the public domain
Insurer’s databases
Physician review sites
Pharmacy databases
Patient websites
Social networking sites
Don’t believe me?
Will YOU engage in Social Media?
YES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Authority
Influence
Reputation
Marketing of practice
Patient education
Share medical knowledge
Crowd-sourcing
Expressing yourself
NO
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Lack of personal privacy
Liability concerns
Patient privacy risks
No way to get paid for it
Takes time
Employment Insecurity
Being marketed to
Being asked for advice online
SOCIAL MEDIA – GETTING STARTED
•
•
•
•
•
•
PRACTICE WEBSITE
– Professional, clean design with simple interface, Dynamic updates, RSS Feed
– ? Patient portal (appointment, refill requests),? Online EMR, ? Patient community
TWITTER
– Each doc has their own twitter page (? + practice twitter for larger practices)
– Broadcast health news, commentary & messages
– Engagement with colleagues ,Crowd sourcing medical dilemmas
– Avoid direct patient interactions
LINKED IN
– Professional network, useful for job networking
FACEBOOK
– Keep practice page and personal pages separate
YOUTUBE
– Patient education videos , medical education
BLOG
– Can be part of practice website or separate
Your patients are not your friends
vs.
IDENTITY
 Authority
 Reputation Control
 Enhanced practice
 Employment security
 Engagement
ANONYMITY
 Privacy
 Freedom
 Employment security
 ?Increases risky online behavior
•
•
•
•
•
•
Posts limited to 140 characters
Can have private account or public account
Users follow other users
– Can block followers or be private and only permit certain followers.
– You don’t have to follow everyone who follows you
Post tweets, comment on other’s tweets, send private messages
Hashtags (#) allow for grouping of related posts
– Conferences, breaking news, topics of interest, Twitter chats
WHO TO FOLLOW?
– Experts in your field
– Reporters who report in your areas of interest
– Medical journalists
– Colleagues
Doctors on Twitter
2158 tweets
from 260 twitter
users with >500
followers
Nature of tweets
49% Health or medical related
21% Personal
12% Self-promotional
1% Medical education
1 % Recommended medical product
148 Tweets (3%) were Unprofessional
33 (0.6%) Contained profanity
38 (0.7%) Potential patient privacy violations
14(0.3%) Contained sexually explicit material
4 (0.1%) Discriminatory statements
JAMA, February 9, 2011—Vol 305, No. 6 567
Twitter Smarts
(@DrWes )
1. Follow smart people doing work that is
relevant to yours. Trash most others.
2. Post relevant, valuable content of interest
to your followers.
3. Watch your time on Twitter. At most, I
spend 20 minutes a day on Twitter, and I
think it would take me far more time offline
to gain and share the same information.
4. Do not EVER post patient information –
Tweets are public and searchable on Google.
Twitter Not-so-Smarts
@mommy_doctor )
The Eleven Commandments of Social Media Engagement
1.
Observe, Listen & Think Before Engaging What are your goals with this tweet/post/comment? Is this
the best platform?
2.
Add Value. Be relevant. Be Accurate. Research & attribute your sources.
3.
Maintain patient privacy – Don’t post anything about a patient that he/she would recognize themselves.
Go beyond HIPAA. Stay away from patient-specific dialogue.
4.
Be Respectful. Keep it Civil. Keep it Clean. Don't post material that is profane, libelous, obscene,
threatening, abusive, harassing, hateful, defamatory or embarrassing to anyone.
5.
Abide by the law. Don't post content that violates any state or federal laws. Get permission to use or
reproduce copyrighted content.
6.
Be Transparent. Disclose affiliations and conflicts. Clearly identify any advertising as such.
7.
Remember - What happens on the Web stays on the Web. Forever. Even if you delete it.
8.
Engage with others. Social media is not a place for you to talk without listening, commenting and
responding to the conversations around you.
9.
Don’t give individual medical advice online
10. Patients are not your friends. Keep your individual Facebook page private.
11. Be yourself. That’s what social media is all about. Show your personality.
Modified from Vanderbuilt University Med Center Social Media Toolkit
ESU course: the twitter contest!
st
1 Rank
Take aways
Engagement with peers through social media…
and especially specialist media for researchers…
can accelerate professional development by:
 Enhancing your profile in professional networks
 Increasing your efficiency in the discovery and
monitoring of information, new developments in
your field
 Exposing your work in multiple channels for
improved discovery, readership and even
citations
 Improving chances of collaboration with
researchers internationally
 Demonstrating the wider impact of your work
beyond traditional citation metrics
Social Media for Beginners
Morgan Rouprêt, MD, PhD
Professor of Urology
@MRoupret
[email protected]

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