Standards are… - Wheelock College

Report
The Development of Pre-K Science,
Technology, and Engineering Standards
2012 MA PRE-STEM and STEM Summit
October 17&18, 2012
Karen Worth
Wheelock College [email protected]
Why New Pre-K STE Standards?
• It is an opportunity to define the nature and substance
of Pre-K STE
• It is an opportunity to emphasize the importance of STE
in Pre-K
• A State Pre-K- 12 STE revision process is underway
Building on What We Know and Have
Frameworks
• The Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts and
Literacy (March 2011): Standards for Pre-Kindergarten
and Kindergarten
• The Curriculum Framework for Mathematics (March
2011): Standards for Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten
• Head Start Child Development and Early Learning
Framework
Building on What We Know and Have
Guidelines
• The Early Learning Guidelines for Infants and Toddlers
(November 2010)
• The Guidelines for Preschool Learning Experiences (April
2003) in all domains except English Language Arts and
Mathematics
• The Kindergarten Learning Experiences (April 2008) in all
domains except English Language Arts and Mathematics
• Headstart
Building on What We Know and Have
Formative Assessment Tools
• The Work Sampling System
• High Scope Child Observation Record
• Teaching Strategies Gold: Assessment System
The Nature of Standards
Standards are…
• Learning outcomes – what children need to know and be
able to do
Standards are not…
• Curriculum
• Pedagogy
A Word About MATH
Domains of Knowledge from The Curriculum
Framework for Mathematics (March 2011)
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Counting and Cardinality
Operation and Algebraic Thinking
Measurement and Data
Geometry
A Word About ELA
Domains of Knowledge from The Curriculum
Framework for English Language Arts and Literacy
(March 2011)
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Reading Standards for Literature
Reading Standards for Informational Text
Reading standards: foundational skills
Language Standards
Writing Standards
Speaking and Listening Standards
STE Standards and the Whole Child
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Curiosity and play
Mathematics (THE M IN STEM)
English Language Arts (ELA)
Physical development and motor skills
Social and emotional development
Approaches toward play and learning
Language and communication development
Characteristics of STE
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Interesting and engaging
Developmentally appropriate and child-centered
Conceptually based
Real world based
Reasoned and reflective
Challenging
Integrated with other domains
Integrated within children’s play
Video
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Is this math?
Is this literacy?
Is this science?
Is this thinking skills?
Is this social and emotional development?
Is this physical development?
Video
• Is this math?
• Geometry, number, measurement
• Is this literacy?
• Communication, description, vocabulary
• Is this science?
• Forces, equilibrium, balance
• Is this thinking skills?
• Problem solving, designing, questioning
• Is this social and emotional development?
• Cooperation, handling challenge and frustration
• Is this physical development?
• Large and small muscle control, hand-eye coordination
Pre-K STE Standards
• Work in Progress/Process
• Based in a National Framework and the on-going work of
revision of the MA Frameworks for Science, Technology
and Engineering
• Three domains
• Practices of science and technology
• Cross-cutting concepts
• Disciplinary core ideas
Dimension 1: STEM Practices
• Asking questions (science) and solving problems
(engineering)
Math Framework: Make sense of problems and
persevere in solving them
• Developing and using models
Math Framework: Model with mathematics
• Planning and carrying out investigations
Math Framework: Reason abstractly and
quantitatively
• Analyzing and interpreting data
Math Framework: Reason abstractly and
quantitatively
Dimension 1: STEM Practices ctd
• Using mathematics and computational thinking
Math Framework: Reason abstractly and quantitatively
• Constructing explanations (science) and designing
solutions (engineering)
• Engaging in argument from evidence
Math Framework: Construct viable arguments and
critique the reasoning of others
• Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
Dimension 1: Practices
The following diagram, taken from A Framework for K-12 Science Education
suggests the way in which the practices interact and describe the scientific and
engineering process.
Theories and
Models
The Real World
Ask Questions
Observe
Experiment
Measure
Argue
Critique
Analyze
Collect Data
Test Solutions
Investigating
Evaluating
Imagine
Reason
Calculate
Predict
Formulate
Hypotheses
Propose
Solutions
Developing
Explanations and
Solutions
Dimension 2: Cross-Cutting Concepts
• Patterns
• Recognize, classify, and record patterns
• Cause and Effect
• Mechanism and Explanation
• Look for and analyze patterns and relationships and what causes
the patterns; design tests to confirm or deny
• Scale, Proportion and Quantity
• Work with objects and space and explicit models
Dimension 2: Cross-Cutting Concepts
• Systems and System Models
• Describe things in terms of parts, roles of parts, and relationship
among parts
• Structure and Function
• Investigate accessible and visible systems in nature and humanbuilt world
• Stability and Change
• Explore building, climbing, growth
Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas
Influences on the selection of content
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Research
Appropriate challenge
Children’s interest, curiosity, and their environment
Articulation with K-12 (progressions of learning)
STE key ideas
The structure of a STE standard
What the structure will do:
• Identify STE learning outcomes
• Highlight content in the context of practices and cross-cutting
ideas - not information
• Identify connections math and ELA frameworks
What the structure will not do:
• Define curriculum
• Define pedagogy
• Explicitly connect to other development goals (e.g. physical,
socio-emotional, etc.)
Core & Component Ideas in Physical
Sciences
• Properties and change in matter
• Motion
• Energy: sound
• Energy light and shadow
Sample Standard
Physical Science: Motion
Children who demonstrate understanding:
• Can plan and carry out investigations of the behaviors of
moving things such as balls on inclined planes or kites in the
air.
Math Connections
Use comparative language such as more/less than, equal to, to
compare and describe collections of objects.
Recognize the attributes of length, area, weight and capacity
of everyday objects using appropriate vocabulary (e.g., long,
short, tall, heavy, light, big, small, wide, narrow).
Sort, categorize and classify objects by more than one
attribute.
Sample Standard
Physical Science: Motion
Children who demonstrate understanding can:
• Plan and carry out investigations of the behaviors of moving
things such as balls on inclined planes or kites in the air.
Books
• Bradley, Kimberly. Forces Make Things Move. (Let’s Red and Find
Out)
• Yolen, Jane. The Emperor and the Kite. Puffin
• Cobb, Vicki. I Fall Down. HarperCollins
• McCully, Emily Arnold. Mirette on the High Wire. Puffin.
Sample Standard
Physical Science: Motion
Children who demonstrate understanding can:
• Describe changes in movement (slowing down, speeding up)
and use physical evidence to explain reasons for the change.
• Make predictions about and demonstrate how objects will
move (speed and direction) when pushed or pulled in different
ways.
Math Connection
• Identify relative position of objects in space, and use appropriate
language (e.g., beside, inside, next to, close to, above, below, apart.
Sample Standard
Physical Science: Energy, light and shadow
Children who demonstrate understanding can:
• Demonstrate and share ideas about how to make a shadow
change size and shape. (Math: measurement, shape)
• Make predictions about the shape of a shadow based on the
object.
Math Connections
 Use comparative language such as more/less than, equal to, to
compare and describe collections of objects.
 Recognize the attributes of length, area, weight, and capacity of
everyday objects using appropriate vocabulary (e.g., long, short, tall,
heavy, light, big, small, wide, narrow).
 Identify relative position of objects in space, and use appropriate
language (e.g., beside, inside, next to, close to, above, below, apart).
Sample Standard
Physical Science: Energy, light and shadow
Children who demonstrate understanding can:
• Demonstrate and share ideas about how to make a shadow
change size and shape. (Math: measurement, shape)
• Make predictions about the shape of a shadow based on the
object.
Books
• Cobb, Vicki. I See Myself. HarperCollins
• Lee, Suzy. Shadow. Chronicle Book
Core & Component Ideas in Life
Sciences
• Organisms (plants and animals – including humans)
• Parts
• Characteristics
• Structures
• Functions and needs
• Growth and development
• How organisms meet their basic needs in their
environments and the many kinds of living things in one
area
Sample Standard
Life Science: How organisms meet their basic
needs in their environment
Children who demonstrate understanding can:
• Explain how some plants and animals in their local might meet
their basic needs.
Math Connection
 Sort, categorize, and classify objects by more than one attribute.
• Make reasoned predictions about how changes in the
environment might effect the living things that depend on it
Sample Standard
Life Science: How organisms meet their basic
needs in their environment
Children who demonstrate understanding can:
• Explain how some plants and animals in their local might meet
their basic needs.
• Make reasoned predictions about how changes in the
environment might effect the living things that depend on it.
Books
 Gilbertson, B. Z. Cactus Hotel. Henry Holt
 Mazer, Anne. Salamander Room. Dragonfly Books
 Gibbons, Gail. From Seed to Plant. Holiday House
Core & Component Ideas in Earth and
Space Sciences
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The sun/moon and their predictable apparent motion
The non-living materials of the environment
Water in the environment
Elements of daily weather
Sample Standard
Earth Sciences: Elements of daily weather
Children who demonstrate understanding can:
• Collect and record data on daily weather and use data to
determine simple patterns.
Math Connection
Listen to and say the names of numbers in meaningful
contexts.
 Use comparative language such as more/less than, equal
to, to compare and describe collections of objects.
Sample Standard
Earth Sciences: Elements of daily weather
Children who demonstrate understanding can:
• Collect and record data on daily weather and use data to
determine simple patterns.
Books
 Ets, Marie Hall. Gilberto and the Wind. Picture Puffin
Cobb, Vicki. I Face the Wind. HarperCollins
Cynthia Rylant. Snow. Harcourt Children’s Books
Technology and Engineering
• Ideas and skills of Engineering and Technology will be
integrated with the science standards
Current State Supports
• The Educator and Provider Support Grantees (EPS) funded by
The Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care
support professional development for the early childhood
field and providers across the state.
• The Regional Readiness Centers are also a source of support
for professional development for early childhood educators
and providers across the state.
Current State Supports
• Professional development opportunities are offered to centerbased, family child care and out of school time providers
through the following resources:
• The Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care
Professional Development Catalogue
http://www.eec.state.ma.us/docs1/Workforce_Dev/20120207_fy
2012_edu_provider_crse_catalogue.pdf
• EEC Online courses offered on EECs website
http://www.mass.gov/edu/birth-grade-12/early-education-andcare/workforce-and-professional-development/training-and-orientationresources/free-competency-based-training-online.html
Current State Supports
• Last year the Regional Readiness Centers provided train the
trainer sessions on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks
for English Language Arts and Mathematics..
• Currently with funding through the Race to the Top Early Learning
Challenge grant Readiness Centers will be offering 4 professional
development opportunities related to early learning standards
annually. These opportunities will be trainings and or courses that
will award academic currency (CEUs or 1.0 college credit).
• Readiness Centers are also working with the Educator and
Provider Support Grantees to offer joint professional
development opportunities across the state.
Current State Supports
• EPS grantees work with The Wheelock College Aspire Institute
Center for Assessment and Screening Excellence(CASE), to offer
professional development opportunities providing statewide
training and technical assistance in early childhood assessment,
screening and program measurement aligned with MA Quality
Rating and Improvement System (QRIS). (EEC funded initiative)
• There are several CEU and college credit courses offered
through the EPS grantees for STEM and Early Learning
Standards. (see STEM booklet in your packet and Course
Catalogue on EECs website)
Current State Supports
Statewide: Number of Proposed Opportunities by Areas of Alignment
81
Infant Toddler Guidelines
115
Preschool Guidelines
119
MA Curriculum Frameworks
142
EEC Regulations
221
QRIS
0
50
100
150
200
250
Timeline
1. Draft of the standards (December 31st, 2012)
2. Public review (January-March, 2013)
3. Final version ( June 30, 2013
Questions to Consider
• What is important to include in the STE standards?
• What are some concerns about STE standards and how
might they be met?
• In what ways might we emphasize direct experience,
integration, and play?
• What are some strategies for making the STE standards
as useful as possible to the field?
• How best might we communicate the content and spirit
of the STE standards to parents
Questions to Consider
• What do “we” want children to know?
• What do “we” want educators to know?
• How do we build/encourage curiosity in children of all
ages and stages of development?
• What curriculum changes can occur? What resources are
needed? What resources exist?

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