Educator Evaluation Workshop: S.M.A.R.T. Goals & Educator Plan

Report
Educator Evaluation
Workshop:
S.M.A.R.T. Goals & Educator
Plan Development
MSSAA Summer Institute
July 26, 2012
Agenda
S.M.A.R.T. Goals
o The role of goals in the 5-Step Cycle
o Two types of goals
o Why team goals?
S.M.A.R.T.er Goals = Educator Plans
o What makes a goal S.M.A.R.T.er?
o Guided practice: turning goals into plans
Tips & Strategies
Resources
2
Intended Outcomes
Understand the rationale and framework for the
MA “SMARTer Goal” model
Be able to identify characteristics of S.M.A.R.T
and S.M.A.R.T.er goals
Be able to translate a “SMARTer” goal into an
Educator Plan
Identify at least one key strategy to take back
to your school that will facilitate goal-setting
and plan development
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
3
5 Step Evaluation Cycle
 Foundation for the
Framework & Model
 Every educator is an
active participant in an
evaluation
 Process promotes
collaboration and
continuous learning
4
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
5-Step Cycle in Action: 9th Gr Biology Teacher
Teacher proposes 1 student
learning goal and one team
professional practice goal.
His department head helps
refine the goals before
approving the goals & plan.
9th Gr Biology teacher
identifies two needs: scientific
reading and writing and
incorporating new curricular
standards into his instruction.
Teacher earns
one of 4 ratings
based on
performance
against the
standards and
progress on goals
Department head
meets with team and
teacher to review
evidence and assess
progress on goals,
adjusting benchmarks
if necessary.
Continuous
Learning
Teacher gathers
and synthesizes
evidence on goal
progress, while
department head
and principal focus
data collection on
goal areas. 5
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
S.M.A.R.T. Goals
6
How to begin?
A thoughtful self-assessment leads to
targeted, results-oriented goals.
7
The Power of
Educator-Driven,
Targeted Action
Thoughtful
SelfAssessment
Establishment
of S.M.A.R.T.
Student
Learning and
Professional
Practice Goals
Educator
Plan
Development
including
key actions
and
benchmarks
Formative
Assessment –
Monitoring
progress and
making
needed
adjustments
Collection of evidence and documentation demonstrating
improvements in professional practice and student growth
8
Step 2: Analysis, Goal Setting
and Plan Development
Educators set at least two goals:
o Student learning goal
o Professional practice goal
(Aligned to the Standards and Indicators of Effective Teaching and/or
Administrative Leadership Practice)
Educators are required to consider team goals
Evaluators have final authority over goals
9
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Data as a Starting Point for
Student Learning Goals
Incoming Student Data – how did these
students do last year? Are there any anomalies
or subgroups that require specific attention?
Past Student Data – how have your students
typically performed in the past?
Aggregate Student Data – are there any trends
in performance, positive or negative, that
characterize students in your school, content
area, and/or grade level?
10
Rubrics as a Starting Point for
Professional Practice Goals
Principal Rubric At-a-Glance
I. Instructional
Leadership
II. Management
& Operations
III. Family &
Community
Engagement
IV. Professional
Culture
A. Curriculum
A. Environment
A. Engagement
A. Commitment to
High Standards
B. Instruction
B. HR Management & B. Sharing
Development
Responsibility
B. Cultural
Proficiency
C. Asssessment
C. Scheduling &
Management
Information Systems
C. Communication
C. Communications
D. Evaluation
D. Law, Ethics &
Policies
D. Family Concerns
D. Continuous
Learning
E. Data-Informed
Decisionmaking
E. Fiscal Systems
E. Shared Vision
F. Managing Conflict
11
S.M.A.R.T. Goals
S
M
A
R
=
=
=
=
T =
Specific and Strategic
Measurable
Action Oriented
Rigorous, Realistic and Resultsfocused (the 3 R’s)
Timed and Tracked
12
What Makes a Goal “S.M.A.R.T.”?
Individually:
Read “What Makes a Goal S.M.A.R.T.?”
Underline one phrase that you find most significant in
the reading
Turn to a partner:
Share your phrases
Discuss the phrases that emerged and any insights
about the document
13
S.M.A.R.T.er Goals
=
Educator Plans
14
A Massachusetts
“SMARTer GOAL”
=
A Goal Statement
+
Key Actions
+
Benchmarks (Process & Outcome)
=
The Heart of the Educator Plan
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
15
Process and Outcome
Benchmarks
Process benchmarks – monitor plan
implementation
Outcome benchmarks – monitor effectiveness of
the plan
16
Guided Practice: A Principal’s
Observations and Feedback
Goal Statement for Classroom Observation
& Feedback:
I will manage my time more effectively in order
to increase the frequency and impact of
classroom observations by learning how to do
10-minute observations and conducting eight
visits with feedback per week, on average.
(Aligned to I.D.2 (Observations & Feedback))
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
17
Guided Practice
In pairs:
1. Review the key actions (are they tightly linked
to the goal?)
2. Review benchmarks:
•
•
are there process benchmarks (actions done)?
outcome benchmark(s) (results)?
3. Identify two revisions and/or additions to the
actions and/or benchmarks that will make this
SMART Goal “S.M.A.R.T.er”
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
18
Guided Practice: A Principal’s
Observations and Feedback
Goal Statement for Classroom Observation &
Feedback:
I will manage my time more effectively in order to
increase the frequency and impact of classroom
observations by learning how to do 10-minute
observations and by the start of second
semester conducting eight visits with feedback
per week, on average, that an increasing
percentage of teachers report are useful
beginning with at least 60%.
(Aligned to I.D.2 (Observations & Feedback))
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
19
Principal Educator Plan Example
Sample Professional Practice Goal for a Principal: I will manage my time more effectively in order
to increase the frequency and impact of classroom observations by learning how to do 10-minute
observations with feedback, and by the start of the second semester, conducting eight visits per
week, on average, that an increasing percentage of teachers report are useful.
Student Learning Goal(s) and Professional Practice Goal(s) Planned Activity
Action
Supports/Resources
from School/District
1. By September 1, I will develop a schedule
and method for logging at least eight
classroom observations with feedback per
week between October 15th and Memorial
Day.
2. By October 15th, I will study with a
colleague principals and my administrative
team how to conduct 10 minute
unannounced observations and write brief,
useful feedback.
3. By January 1st, I will share at least 5
samples of feedback with principal
colleagues and collect their feedback.
4. By January and again on June 1, I will
solicit anonymous feedback from teachers
about their perceptions of the usefulness of
the unannounced visits and feedback.
Superintendent to
facilitate teams of
principals to
collaborate on
enhancing the
observation and
feedback process.
Superintendent
will help identify
teams and
provide
scheduled time to
hold study groups
and conduct
feedback
sessions.
Timeline/Benchmark or Frequency
1. September 1 – schedule
developed
January 15/March 15/May 15 –
check in to determine of 8
observations per week (on average)
have been completed.
2. October 15th – documented study
time with colleague
3. January 1st – 5 feedback samples
will be shared with colleagues
4. January 1st and June 1st will have
collected feedback via teachers
20
regarding their perceived value of
the process.
*Evidence provided through
principals logs and example artifacts
Process and Outcome
Benchmarks
Process benchmarks – monitor plan
implementation
o January 15/March 15/May 15 – check in to determine
if 8 observations per week (on average) have been
completed.
Outcome benchmarks – monitor effectiveness of
the plan
o January 1st and June 1st will have collected feedback
via teachers regarding their perceived value of the
process.
21
Four Types of Educator Plans
Developing Educator Plan
For educators without Professional Teaching status, administrators
in the first three years in a district, or at the discretion of an
evaluation for an educator in a new assignment
Self-Directed Growth Plan
For experienced educators rated proficient or exemplary on their
last evaluation; these plans can be one or two years in length
Directed Growth Plan
For educators rated in need of improvement of on their last
evaluation
Improvement Plan
For educators rated unsatisfactory on their last evaluation
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
22
Educator Plans: Requirements
and Timelines
Self-Directed
Growth Plan
 Rated Proficient or Exemplary
Directed
Growth Plan
 Rated Needs Improvement
Improvement
Plan
 Rated as Unsatisfactory
Developing
Educator Plan
 Without Professional Status
o 1- or 2-year plan
o developed by the educator
o 1-year plan or less
o developed by the educator & evaluator
o At least 30 calendar days; up to 1 year
o developed by the evaluator
o 1-year plan or less
o Developed by the educator & evaluator
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
23
Educator Plan Cheat Sheet
Formative Assessment/Evaluation:
o Formative Assessments: plans that are 1-year or less
in duration, mid-cycle check-in on goals
o Formative Evaluations: 2-year plans, occur end-ofyear, ratings default to previous Summative Rating
unless evidence indicates significant change
Student learning goals lend themselves to oneyear goals
IPDPs can be merged into educator plans (see
revised licensure regulations)
24
Tips & Strategies
25
Where to begin?
Strategy 1: Aligned Goals
District Goals
School Goals
The Power of
Concerted
Action
Team Goals
Teacher Goals
26
Strategy 1: Aligned Goals
An Example
District Goal
Anti-Bullying Initiative
School Improvement Support the behavioral health needs of
Goal
all students.
Standard/
Indicator
School
Administrator Team
Goal
During the 2011 – 2012 school year,
the HS Administrative Team will review
and refine protocols in an effort to
reach 100% consistency in
administrating policy to support
students’ social/emotional/behavioral
needs.
II.A
(Environment)
Teacher Goal
During the 2011-2012 school year, I
will learn and appropriately use an
increasing number of effective rituals,
routines and responses that prevent
most behaviors that interfere with
student learning.
II.B
(Learning
Environment) 27
Where to begin?
Strategy 2: Focus the Self-Assessment
Murkland ES
School leaders aligned District Core Issues and School
Improvement Goals to specific parts of the rubric
 Led to focused and coherent self-assessment and goalsetting processes for all educators,
 Promoted collaboration and shared accountability
throughout the school
 “not just one more thing but something we’re already
doing”
 Note: all Standards and Indicators are still important. This is
about focusing and prioritizing to support coherence and
“doability”
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
28
Teacher Rubric-at-a-Glance
Think of one major initiative or focus in your
school for 2012-2013.
Using the teacher rubric at-a-glance, identify two
Indicators (or elements) that you would most
likely focus on with teachers related to this
initiative.
(Ex: Revised MA Curricular Frameworks)
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
29
Where to begin?
Strategy 3: Promote Team Goals
 Districts that promote team goals have found this
work more ‘doable’
 Team goals support collaboration, communication,
and likelihood of success (admin teams too!)
 Tips & Strategies
 Promote school or district goals
 Support regular team time
 Identify common process & benchmark outcomes
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
30
Where to begin?
Strategy 4: Backward Mapping
Start with the PD you have planned – what
do you expect your teachers to accomplish
this year?
Locate these objectives in the rubric and
let those drive the self-assessment and
goal-setting processes back at your school
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
31
Next Steps – Suggestions for Principals
 Review “SMART” Goal Setting and assess how
“SMART” your current school improvement goals
are.
 Read School-Level Planning & Implementation
Guide (Part II of the Model System) and the
School-Level Administrator Rubric (Part III,
Appendix B)
 Locate your school improvement focus areas in
the Administrator and Teacher rubric
32
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Resources
Massachusetts Model System for
Educator Evaluation
33
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
School-Level Planning &
Implementation Guide
Content Overview
The Massachusetts Model System for Educator
Evaluation
Step 1: Self-Assessment
Step 2: Goal Setting and Plan Development
Step 3: Implementation of the Plan
Step 4: Formative Assessment and Evaluation
Step 5: Summative Evaluation
Appendices: Forms for Educator Evaluation, Setting
SMART Goals
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
34
ESE Evaluation Resources
What’s coming?
− Summer 2012
 Guidance on District-Determined Measures
 Training Modules with facilitator guides, PowerPoint
presentations, and participant handouts
 List of approved vendors
 Updated website with new Resources section
 Newsletter
35
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
ESE Evaluation Resources
What’s coming?
− Fall/Winter 2012
 Solicit and review feedback on Model System; update
 Research & develop student and staff feedback instruments
 Collect and disseminate best practices
 Collect and vet assessments to build a repository of district
measures
 Internal collaboration to support cross-initiative alignment
 EX: Support for use of rubric for teachers of ELLs aligned 36
to RETELL initiative
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Overview of Training Modules
 Module 1: Overview
 Module 2: Unpacking the Rubric
 Module 3: Self-Assessment
 Module 4: S.M.A.R.T. Goals and Educator Plan Development
 Module 5: Gathering Evidence
 Module 6: Observations and Feedback
 Module 7: Rating Educator Performance
 Module 8: Rating Impact on Student Learning
37
For More Information and Resources:
Visit the ESE educator evaluation website:
www.doe.mass.edu/edeval
Contact ESE with questions and suggestions:
[email protected]
Presenters:
Claire Abbott – [email protected]
Preeya Pandya – [email protected]
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
38

similar documents