WHMIS FOR DUMMIES

Report
WHMIS FOR DUMMIES
David Dai
Ashley Danielson
Will Levy
Julia Lucht
Hector Wong
What is WHMIS?
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The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System
A 3 part system which gives canadian workers the right to know the
health and safety hazards of the materials they work with.
A standard used across Canada to promote safe lab and chemical
handling practices.
Developed by Canadian governmental bodies
o came into effect on October 31, 1988
Importance of WHMIS to a
Worker and a Student
1) Knowledge in WHMIS is crucial in multiple job settings:
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Scientists
Factory Workers:
Cleaners/Janitors
Retail/Food industry
Mechanics
Office Workers
Importance of WHMIS to a
Worker and a Student
2) Educates students on the importance of
lab safety and opens many opportunity
3) Provides steps and procedures
to follow in case of emergency
4) Gives workers the right to be aware of
the potentially hazardous chemicals they
are associating with
5) Creates a safe workplace
Hazardous Products Act
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Federal legislation that works alongside the principles of
WHMIS to enforce safety in the workplace
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Outlines which materials are regulated by WHMIS
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Without the HPA, WHMIS could not function
Controlled Products
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Controlled products are materials or substances labeled
as potentially harmful by the HPA and regulated by
WHMIS
All controlled products fall under 1 or many of 6
WHMIS classifications, which are recognized by their
cautionary symbols.
The Classifications of
WHMIS
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There are 6 categories classified under WHMIS which
are ordered in letters ranging from class A-F.
All controlled products fall under one of these classes
cautionary symbols are used to represent each
classification and their divisions.
Class A- Compressed Gas
Controlled products are classified under this class if:
1. It is a material that is normally a gas
2. The material is under pressure or is being chilled
3. The gas is usually contained in a cylinder
Products under this class are dangerous since:
1. They are under high pressure and can "rocket" or "torpedo" if the container
holding the gas is ruptured
2. If heated, it can explode
3. Since the gas is often chilled, a leaking container can result in instant or
severe frostbite
Common examples of Products under this Class include:
1. Phosgene (Toxic)
2. Propane (Flammable)
3. Sulfur Dioxide (Corrosive)
Safety Precautions
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Secure in a contained Cylinder
Avoid Heat and Ignition Sources
Transport and Handle Carefully
Store in a cool ventilated area
Class B- Flammable and
Combustible Material
Controlled products are classified under this class if:
1. They burn or catch fire at normal temperature
2. React with air or water to make flammable gas
3. They may be a gas, liquid or solid
Controlled products in this class are dangerous since:
1. They catch fire easily
2. They can explode
Common examples of this class include:
1. Propane
2. Acetone
3. Butane
Safety Precautions
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Handle far away from flames or ignition sources
Store with cap tightened since the discharged fumes
are more flammable than liquid
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Avoid Inhalation and skin contact
Class C- Oxidizing
Materials
Controlled products are classified under this category if:
1. They do not usually burn themselves, but cause other materials to
combust by providing oxygen
2. These materials increase the risk of fire if they come in contact with
flammable or combustible materials.
Controlled products in this class are dangerous since:
1. Intensify flames and explosions
2. Support a fire even if there is no air
3. Cause spontaneous combustions even without an ignition source
Common Examples of this class include:
1. Nitric acid
2. Ozone
3. Persulfates
Safety Precautions
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Wear protective clothing
Avoid personal contact
Store away from heat and flammable materials
Contain in durable containers
Class D- Poisonous and
Infectious Materials
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The fourth class a controlled product can fall under are poisonous and
infectious materials
Controlled products under Class D cause lethal and immediate harm to
your body.
The harmful effects these materials cause are subdivided into 3 divisions
Division 1
Division 2
Division 3
Division 1- Materials Causing Immediate
and Serious Toxic Effects
Controlled products are classified under this division if:
1. They are poisonous
2. Immediately dangerous to life and health
Control products in this division are dangerous since:
1. They cause immediate harm to the body
2. Cause serious health issues such as; burns, loss of consciousness, coma
or death
3. Exposure to these products can cause permanent or long term health
problems
Common examples of this division include:
1. Carbon monoxide
2. Sodium cyanide
3. Halogens
Division 2- Materials
Causing Other Toxic Effects
Controlled products are classified under this division if:
1. They are poisonous as well
2. Their effects are only temporary
Controlled products in this division are dangerous since:
1. Though slower and not as immediate than division 1, Division 2 products
are equally as harmful
a. Can cause cancer
b. allergies or irritation
c. reproductive problems
d. Inflict harm to both a pregnant woman and their baby
e. changes to your genes
Common examples of this division include:
1. Mercury
2. Lead
3. Acetone
Division 3- Biohazardous
infectious Materials
Controlled products are classified under this division if:
1. The materials are organisms such viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites
2. Cause infectious and contagious disease in both human and animals
Controlled products in this division are dangerous since:
1. The products of this division infect the human body
2. Can give serious disease which result in death
3. If not handled properly, could cause an outbreak in disease.
4. Affect the internals of our bodies
5. Cause mutations
Common examples of this division include:
1. HIV/AIDS
2. Super virus
3. Salmonella
4. Hepatitis B
Safety Precautions
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Avoid any physical contact or inhalation
Handle in proper equipment, such as WHMIS regulated lab coats or
overcoats and fume blocking masks
Avoid use of these chemicals if possible
Research extensively before use
Work away from windows to not spread fumes through breezes
Handle away from other chemicals.
Class E- Corrosive Material
Controlled products are classified under this class if:
1. They are liquids
2. Possess a corroding property which can burn through clothes, human
tissue or even metal
Controlled products in this class are dangerous since:
1. They seriously burn human tissue if came into contact with
2. The effects of corrosive products are painful and permanent
3. Can blind an individual if some reaches the eye
Common examples of this class include:
1. Sulphuric Acid
2. Ammonium Hydroxide
3. High Concentrations of Chlorine
Safety Precautions
• Do not bring near Human Tissue
• Keep away from Metals
• Do not allow fumes to escape
Class F- Dangerously
Reactive Material
Controlled products are classified under this class if:
1. it can react vigorously with water to make a toxic gas
2. it will react with itself when it is agitated (bumped, dropped), or if the
temperature or pressure increases
3. it can vigorously join to itself (polymerization), break down (decomposition)
or lose extra water such that it is a more dense material (condensation).
Controlled products in this class are dangerous since:
1. These materials are extremely unstable
2. At constant risk of explosion if not handled carefully and properly
Common examples of this class include:
1. Pitric Acid
2. Ethylene Oxide
3. Ether
Safety Precautions
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Avoid Use if possible
Keep away from potential reactions
Do not mix with other chemicals
Acute and Chronic
Exposure
There are two types of exposure a worker can encounter when handling
controlled products
Acute Exposure
Chronic Exposure
Short term exposure to a product
Long term exposure to a product
The effects are immediate and serious
and obvious in less than 24 hours
The effects are serious and harmful
but only if exposed to for long periods
of time
Ex: Cyanide -D1 Products
Ex: Mercury -D2 Products
The Key Elements of
WHMIS
1.Supplier Label
2.MSDS
3.Education and Training
1) Supplier Label
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Immediately recognizable by its hashed black and white borders
Detail basic information of a product such as the hazards and how to
protect yourself from the hazards
Hazardous products from a supplier must contain a supplier label
If there is no supplier label, the product is incomplete and cannot be used
The Criteria of a Standard
Supplier Label
A supplier label must include:
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1) Product Identifier
2) Supplier Identifier
3) Hazard Symbols
4) Risk Phrases
5) Precautionary Measures
6) First Aid Measures
7) MSDS Reference
2) MSDS
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Stands for Material Safety Data Sheet and has 4 main focuses
1. To tell workers vital information on a desired chemical
2. To ensure that people are aware on how to handle harmful
chemicals.
3. To provide emergency prevention measures
4. To provide procedures and instruction on emergency
handling
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The MSDS is regularly updated to remain current, accurate and no
more 3 years old
The Areas Which the
MSDS Covers
The MSDS provides information on a product in the following areas:
Chemical Product and
Company Identification
Composition,
Information on
Ingredients
Hazardous
Identification
First Aid Measures
Fire Fighting Measures
Accidental Release
Measures
Handling and Storage
Exposure Controls,
Personal Protection
Physical and Chemical
Properties
Stability and Reactivity
Toxicological
information
Ecological Information
Disposal
Considerations
Transport Information
Regulatory Information
Additional Information
3) Education and Training
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Employers must provide instruction to each worker on how to use
WHMIS
Universities and Companies offer online and real life courses
Courses are subject to revision and check up every 2-3 years
WHMIS courses vary in terms of information depending on the
profession
o Ex: an office worker will not receive the same WHMIS training
an industrial worker would.
Review
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Identify the Name/Class/Division (if it is one) of the following symbols
Biohazard
Compressed Gas
Flammable/Combustible
Class D
Class A
Class B
Division 1
Not a Division
Not a Division
Review
What are the 3 Components of WHMIS?
Supplier Label, MSDS, Education and Training
Which Class is Dangerously Reactive?
Class F
What are two pieces of information that must be on the Supplier Label?
Product Identifier, Supplier Identifier, Hazard Symbols, Risk Phrases,
Precautionary Measures, First Aid Measures, MSDS Reference
What are some differences between Acute and Chronic Exposure?
Short term exposure vs Long term, Immediate harms vs Later harms
In Conclusion...
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WHMIS is vital to workplace safety and should be
taught to all students
• WHMIS has achieved a safer workplace by providing
workers with the knowledge and tools to enable them to
work safely.
Bibliography
"Supplier Label."Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. Canadian Centre for Health
and Workplace Safety, 19 Jan. 2006. Web. 1 April. 2013.
<http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/legisl/msdss.html>.
"Hazards"Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. Canadian Centre for Occupational
Health and Safety, 12 July 2001. Web. 1 April. 2013.
<http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/legisl/msds_lab.html>.
"WHMIS."Health Canada. Government of Canada, 18 Jan. 2008. Web. 1 April. 2013. <http://www.hcsc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/occup-travail/whmis-simdut/work-travail-eng.php>.
“Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System.” Health Canada. Government of Canada, 10
June 2010. Web. 1 April. 2013. <http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/occup-travail/whmissimdut/index-eng.php>.
"Introduction to WHMIS." Work Safe BC. Workers’ Compensation Board of BC, 2012. Web. 25 April.
2013. <http://www2.worksafebc.com/topics/whmis/Introduction.asp>.

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