General_awareness_web - University of Huddersfield

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MANAGEMENT OF STRESS
Web based training course for employees
who have management responsibilities
NB please view as a ‘Slide Show’ to enable
the hyperlinks in this presentation
Please note that this training course contains
Audio
Aims and Objectives
This course is aimed to give managers awareness and knowledge on
work related stress and enable you to carry out a stress risk assessment
with a member of your team if appropriate.
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Understanding of what stress is and the legal requirements /
University policy
Employee and manager responsibilities including management
behaviours
How to carry out a stress risk assessment
Rehabilitation back to work following stress related sickness absence
Complete test at the end of the online course
Stress can affect anyone!
Sources of Stress
‘There is considerable variation in the way
individuals perceive and respond to the
environments in which they work’ Noblet and
Lamontagne 2006
Please follow the below link to watch the first part of a case study we will
revisit this case later on in the course
http://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/video/danstorynew1.htm
What is work related stress?
Occupational stress occurs when external demands and conditions do
not match a person’s needs, expectations or ideals or exceed their
physical capacity, skills, or knowledge for comfortably handling a
situation (French et al 1982)
Triggers for stress can be both personal or work related (often a
combination of both). It is important to consider both factors when
dealing with an individual displaying signs of stress. Both can be
contributory factors.
Stress – HSE Guidance
Please use these links for reference following completion of this training:
• The management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations explains your
duties as a manager (Please note that this document produced by the HSE
is currently changing therefore please follow the below link and follow the
information currently provided by the HSE)
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l21.htm
•
HSG218 Managing the causes of work related stress (Health and Safety
Executive 2007)
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg218.htm
This also provides practical advice on what managers can do to assess
and prevent work related stress (WRS) and so comply with health and
safety law
University stress policy (revised
2011)
The University stress policy was revised in 2011. As a manager you
should ensure that all members of your team are aware of the policy.
“The University of Huddersfield is committed to providing a healthy
working environment for all of its employees. This includes where
reasonable the protection of employees against work related stress and
to promote their health and wellbeing”
Please follow the below link to read the University stress policy:
http://www.hud.ac.uk/media/universityofhuddersfield/content/files/hr/occh
ealth/Revised%20stress%20policy%20Feb%202011.doc
Difference between stress or
pressure
There is a difference between stress and pressure
• It is reasonable to assume that employees are mentally capable of
withstanding reasonable pressures at work
• All employees are subjected to periods of pressure at work
• Short periods of pressure are not necessarily of concern and can help
us to be motivated, improve concentration and challenge us in a
positive way
• Sustained and / or excessive pressure over long periods of time can
result in anxiety, depression and poor lifestyle patterns
• This is commonly referred to as stress and can lead to ill health
Employee responsibilities
Employees have responsibilities to ensure their own health and
wellbeing. They need to:
• Make themselves aware of the University stress policy
• Take responsibility to discuss any problems with their manager
• Work with their manager to identify and act on causes of stress in
their work
• Attend and utilise any relevant training and development opportunities
relevant to their job role
• They can self refer to Occupational Health if they feel unable to
discuss any problems with their line manager. Employees are made
aware at the start of the self referral process that it is very difficult to
resolve any work related issues if their manager does not have any
knowledge of the problem
What are my responsibilities as a
manager?
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You need to ensure that employees are made aware of the University
stress policy
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Recognise any potential triggers for stress within your team and act
on these if appropriate
•
Consider potential effect of stress on your team (both work and home
issues)
Further management responsibilities
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You need to ensure the monitoring of employee sickness records as
per the University policy:
http://www.hud.ac.uk/hr/policies/policymenu/index.php?id=1000098
Persistent short term sickness absence can sometimes indicate an
underlying stress related problem
Undertake a stress risk assessment on individuals exhibiting signs of
possible stress – guidance on completing the risk assessment will be
given later on in this training
Review and update the stress risk assessment as appropriate. This is
important to show ongoing actions and gives you a chance to discuss
any ongoing issues with the individual
Consider adaptations / adjustments to maintain work and home life
balance that can be fitted into the service need
Signs of stress to watch out for
The following can be symptoms displayed by an individual suffering with stress:
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Headaches
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Stomach problems
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Skin rashes
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Tingling, pins and needles
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Tense / irritable
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Loss of interests
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Sense of dread
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Anxiety and / or depression
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Self neglect
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Denial of problems
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Out of character behaviour eg a normally outgoing person becoming withdrawn
These symptoms can also be signs of other health conditions therefore the
individual must see their GP to rule out any other causes.
Management competencies for
preventing and reducing stress at
work
Identifying and developing the management behaviours necessary to
implement the HSE management standards – Health and Safety Executive
2007
This research has identified that management behaviour is an important
determinant of employee stress levels. Link to this document for
reference following completion of this training:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrhtm/rr553.htm
HSE Manager competencies for
preventing and reducing stress at
work
Competency
Good examples
Bad examples
Respectful and responsible: managing
emotions and having integrity
•Is a good role model
•Honest
•Acts calmly in pressured
situations
•Takes a consistent approach
•Moods are unpredictable
•Passes on their stress to
members of the team
•Creates unrealistic deadlines
Managing and communicating existing
and future work
•Clearly communicates job
objectives
•Is able to prioritise
workloads
•Can deal with problems in a
rational and clear manner
•Is able to delegate work to
the team and has a
knowledge of their team
limitations
•Struggles to make a decision
•Does not give any direction to the
members of their team
Manager competencies continued
Competency
Good examples
Bad examples
Reasoning / managing difficult
situations
•Deals with issues of conflict when they
arise and can act as a mediator in these
situations
•Is able to deal objectively with conflicts
•Follows up conflicts
•Supports members of their team
through incidents of bullying or abuse
•Does not address issues such as
bullying within the team
•Does not resolve any issues and
just acts on the basis to keep the
peace
Managing the individual within
the team
•Communicates verbally rather than
using email as the main point of contact
•Is available to talk when needed
•Encourages input from members of the
team
•Takes an interest with the team’s life
outside of work eg regularly asking ‘how
are you?’
•Willing to have a laugh at work
•Assumes members of their team
are ok rather than actually checking
•Passes on their own concerns /
stress to members of their team
Stress management competency
indicator tool
The stress management competency indicator tool developed by the HSE
is designed to allow you to identify and reflect upon your own behaviour
and management style
Please follow the below link and complete this activity:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/mcit.htm
On completion you can print out a personalised report
Why do a stress risk
assessment?
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To identify factors that are likely to cause intense or sustained levels
or work related stress
Work out control measures / actions aimed at reduction of stress
To ensure you have a record of your actions
To reduce the possibility of long term sickness absence due to stress
related problems which can add pressures on the rest of the team
Stress Risk Assessment
Please click onto the following link and look under stress resources.
Follow the link for stress risk assessment to see an example of the
Assessment
http://www.hud.ac.uk/media/universityofhuddersfield/content/files/hr/occ
health/Q139%20SRA%20form.doc
The stress risk assessment is separated into 6 different sections to
consider when looking at work related stress. This is to help the
individual look at the specific area that is a trigger for stress
which can be less daunting than looking at their job as a whole
Please read information on the HSE management standards available at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/standards/
Example of the university stress
risk assessment
Please go to this link and familiarise yourself with the
University stress risk assessment form
http://www.hud.ac.uk/media/universityofhuddersfield/content/files/hr/occ
health/Q139%20SRA%20form.doc
Indicators for stress
The triggers for stress are separated into the following categories on
the stress risk assessment. It is good practice to carry out a stress risk
assessment on any employee who is displaying signs of stress. This
gives you as their manager an opportunity to put support in place for
them and to try and resolve any issues or concerns before they become
more serious or problematic
Some of these categories may not be relevant to each employee however
it is good practice to consider all of them during the assessment
6 Different Categories
The following categories are taken from the HSE management
Standards http://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/standards/
1. Demands
Such as workload and exposure to physical hazards
2. Control
How much a person has in the way in which work is done
6 Categories cont…
3. Relationships
Examples of this can include harassment and bullying, please read the
University Dignity at Work policy available at the following link
http://www.hud.ac.uk/equality/dignityatwork/
4. Role
Does the individual understand what their role is and what is expected of
them at work
6 Categories cont…
5. Support
This can be from managers and peers. Has the individual had sufficient
training to do their job? Do they get appropriate feedback on the work
that they do?
6. Change
Changes within a person’s job role or organisation
Revisit the stress risk
assessment
• It is important to revisit the stress risk assessment with the individual
at agreed intervals to review progress and agree any further actions
• Gives an opportunity to discuss any outstanding matters and to agree
and record the next steps
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Ensures that as a manager you can demonstrate your actions
What to do if the individual goes off
work with stress related illness
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Try to be accepting, reassuring and calm
Keep in touch, please follow below link to revisit the case study from
earlier
http://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/video/danstory-new3.htm
• Respond in a helpful way by listening to staff who are going through a
stressful time
• Ask the person how you can assist rather that assuming a particular
course of action is best
• Create a culture where staff seek help and manage their own support
needs
Rehabilitation Into Work
• If an individual has been absent from work for a significant period of
time with a health condition it is important to work with the individual to
formulate a successful return to work plan and to try and reduce the
likelihood of further sickness. Further information and resources to
support you in this can be found at http://www.hud.ac.uk/oh/
Absence
• You need to ensure that the person is aware that it is expected they
return to the range of duties you would expect from someone in that job
and to an agreed timescale (usually 4 to 6 weeks)
Support to consider when
rehabilitating back to work
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The individual may benefit from a phased return to work. This can
include building up hours and duties normally over a 4 week period.
Further advice on this can be obtained by referring the person to
Occupational Health
• Referral to Occupational Health prior to the individual returning to
work. Please go to the below link and familiarise yourself with the
occupational health referral process:
http://www.hud.ac.uk/oh/referrals/
Occupational Health Service
• The Occupational Health service can provide further support and
advice for individuals suffering with stress related illness and for the
managers dealing with these cases
• Managers can refer employees to Occupational Health. Once a referral
is received we will make the individual the next available appointment
with one of the Occupational Health Nursing Advisers
How to do a stress risk
assessment
Please choose one of the following case studies to look at for an example
of how to carry out a stress risk assessment and actions you may take as
the person’s manager.
If you are a manager in a support service role please
choose case study 1 on the next slide.
If you are a manager in an
academic role please choose case study 2 on slide 37.
Stress risk assessment - case
studies
Case study 1
A member of your team has been struggling to meet deadlines recently and continues to say
in the office when among other colleagues that they have too much work to do and that they
never have a proper lunch break. You have noticed that over the past few weeks this employee
is starting to get agitated with other colleagues and that the individual is complaining when
they are being asked to do work. You are also aware that this individual has caring
responsibilities for elderly parents and that the employee’s father has recently been diagnosed
with dementia.
You have also noticed over the past few months that this individual takes on extra work duties
which are not necessarily part of their job role. The individual often comments on these extra
duties and how much other work they are doing compared to colleagues.
As the individual’s manager you arrange to meet with them and complete a stress risk
assessment together without making any assumptions.
Stress risk assessment
Case Study 1.
Using case study 1 undertake a Stress Risk Assessment using the pro
forma linked below. Consider how this would work in practice before you
move on to the following slides to see a worked example.
http://www.hud.ac.uk/media/universityofhuddersfield/content/files/hr/occ
health/Q139%20SRA%20form.doc
How to carry out a stress risk
assessment – support staff
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Role
•Competency
•Working
Patterns
•Environment
•Clarity of role
Manager feels
employee may not
be clear on what is
expected of them in
their job role and
often takes on extra
tasks which are not
required
Clarity of
job role
required by
manager
Manager to clarify
job role and duties
for employee and
look at assisting
individual to
prioritise own
workload
One month and
ongoing
appraisal process
Demands
•Workload
Employee identifies
high workload
demands, not
enough time to meet
deadlines
Manager
suggests
prioritising
workload
and not
taking on
other tasks
not required
for role due
to time
restraints
Both manager and
employee to work
together to
determine priorities
Straight away
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Revised
action plan
Control over work
•Organisation
•Pace
•Decision making
Employee feels
that they have no
control over work
and never takes
a lunch break
due to having to
cover the office
Employee and
manager to
ensure that lunch
break rota is
worked out fairly
to ensure that all
members of the
team feel that
they can have a
lunch break
Manager with
input from the
team
Straight away
One month –
Individual has
been able to
prioritise
workload to
ensure that they
get a break
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Support
•Advice / one to
one meetings
•Manager
availability
•Training needs
•Non workplace
stressors (flexible
working)
•Isolation
Employee feels
that everything is
left to them and
has to do duties
that other
colleagues are
not expected to
do.
Lack of support
in personal life in
caring for elderly
parents, has 2
siblings however
they live away
and do not
contribute to the
care
Manager
suggests referral
to occupational
health for further
advice in dealing
with current
personal issues.
To look at the
possibility of
flexible working.
Discusses with
employee issues
with colleagues
and encourages
clarity of job role
and personal
development
training by SDG
Manager and
employee
2 to 4 weeks
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
Stress risk
factors – items
to consider
Problems
identified
(by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Relationships
•Conflict
•Communication
•Clarity of team
roles
Employee
feels that
some
colleagues do
not do their
fair share of
work and that
they have to
make up for
this
Re evaluate
workload across
the team to
ensure that this is
fair. Encourage
employee to
raise issues with
manager as soon
as they arise.
Employee and
manager
One month
Team meetings
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Change
•Communication
/ awareness
•Comments /
consultation
•Planning
No obvious
change at
present however
may be
considered within
ongoing team
plans
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Manager
Straight away
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Case study 2
One of the senior lecturers in your team has been absent from work for
one month with work related stress written on the individual’s fit note. As
the individual’s manager you have referred them to Occupational Health
and have the report from them which advises you to complete a stress
risk assessment for the individual as part of their rehabilitation to work.
Occupational Health have advised you on their report that the individual
has identified change, support and relationships as their main triggers for
stress.
What key factors might you consider as the manager?
Stress risk assessment
Case Study 2.
Using case study 2 undertake a Stress Risk Assessment using the pro
forma linked below.
Consider how this would work in practice before you
move on to the following slides to see a worked example.
http://www.hud.ac.uk/media/universityofhuddersfield/content/files/hr/occ
health/Q139%20SRA%20form.doc
How to carry out a stress risk
assessment – academic staff
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Role
•Competency
•Working
Patterns
•Environment
•Clarity of role
Employee
seeking some
clarity on role
and what is
expected of them
following recent
module delivery
changes
Meeting with
manager and
employee to
discuss changes
and identify any
training needs.
Manager and
employee
Straight away
Demands
•Workload
Employee feels
that workload
demands have
increased
following recent
changes on how
course modules
are delivered
Encourage
individual to
prioritise
workload
demands and
manage own
workload
Employee
One month
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Control over work
•Organisation
•Pace
•Decision making
Perceived lack of
control over work
from individual –
this often relates
to taking on extra
work duties and
the individual
feeling that they
have to get
everything done
‘all at once’.
There does not
appear to be any
prioritising of
workload
Encourage
employee
management of
personal
workload and can
set own pace of
work within the
constraints of
meeting
deadlines and
university
business needs
Employee and
manager
One month
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Support
•Advice / one to
one meetings
•Manager
availability
•Training needs
•Non workplace
stressors (flexible
working)
•Isolation
Individual feels
that they do not
get any support
from senior
colleagues and
peers. Feels that
recent changes
to the way
courses are
delivered have
not been
discussed
properly.
Team have
responsibility to
raise any issues
with manager as
soon as they
occur and involve
them in decisions
Manager and
employee
One month
Manager to try
and improve
communication to
the team
regarding
changes.
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Support
•Advice / one to
one meetings
•Manager
availability
•Training needs
•Non workplace
stressors (flexible
working)
•Isolation
Support
continued
Regular one to
one meetings
whilst stress risk
assessment
action plan is in
progression.
Consider ongoing
management
schedule
Manager
Straight away
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Relationships
•Conflict
•Communication
•Clarity of team
roles
Lack of clarity of
team roles
causing tensions
amongst the
team. Individual
has expressed
that due to this
they can
sometimes feel
isolated from
some of their
colleagues
Regular team
meetings to
discuss any
implemented
changes and get
input from the
team and positive
action to work
through and if
possible resolve
issues
Manager and
team input
Two months
Revised
action plan
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
Stress risk
factors –
items to
consider
Problems
identified (by
employee
and
manager)
Practical
solutions
By whom
When
Revised
action plan
Change
•Communication
/ awareness
•Comments /
consultation
•Planning
Recent changes
to course
modules and the
way these are
delivered. The
individual feels
that they have
not been
discussed with
the team and
clarity over new
roles has not
been given.
Improving
communication
between
management and
team
Manager and
employee
Two months
Two month point
– regular team
meetings
implemented by
manager and
employee feels
that these have
been beneficial in
improving
communication
within the team
Team meetings
to discuss new
changes and how
these can be
implemented
effectively.
Action
completed
Stress risk assessment continued
It is important to revisit you risk assessment at planned
intervals to ensure that any actions have been beneficial for
the individual and look at any further support measures that
can be put in place
Test
Please complete the following test to enable you to
complete the course.
The link will take you to Unilearn, the test is held within
My Resources under Occupational Health training.
Management of stress course test
Occupational Health Contact Details
Telephone:
E-mail:
Website:
01484 471800
[email protected]
http://www.hud.ac.uk/oh/
We also have a range of stress links and resources on our website
including a range of self help material
If you have any further questions following this course or require
any additional advice please contact the Occupational Health
department either by telephone or email to make an appointment
with one of the Occupational Health Nursing Advisors who will be
able to talk to you on a one to one basis

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