HF302 Apr 7 - freville-at

Report
April 7
 This Friday: One hour of presentations (not panel) in lieu of
this class. Turn in short commentary for grade.
 HFAP Program: http://hfapconference.com/
 Questions about design project? Data collection?
 http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/blog/Documents
/20120119%20JCIDS%20Process%20Flow%2024x60%20rev
%201%200.pdf (Joint Capabilities Integration Development
System – JCIDS)
 Quiz Review
 Back to the House of Quality Examples
 Fatigue and Circadian Rhythms
Strategies for Grounding Your
Design in Research
Trade-Off Analysis
House of Quality
But first…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnUEDA6drB
8
- The
University of
Colorado’s
“Energy
Efficient
Engineers”,
2012
House of Quality Example
Customer
Requirements
Light weight
Easy to use
Reliable
Target Values
Customer
Importance
50
30
20
Aluminum
Parts
Steel
Parts
5
2
4
330
Auto
Focus
Auto
Exposure
8
7
8
5
3
260
340
270
Variant of House of Quality
House Of
Quality
Tradeoff
Matrix
Importance
Product
characteristics
Customer
requirements
Relationship
matrix
Technical assessment and
target values
Competitive
assessment
Source: Hauser,
J.R., & Clausing,
D. (1988). The
House of Quality.
Harvard Business
Review, MayJune, 2-14.
Retreived from
www.csuchico.ed
u/~jtrailer/HOQ.p
df.
Cascade the Houses to “derive your requirements”:
Functional
CTQs
House of
Quality
(QFD Matrix 2)
Technical
CTQs
House of
Quality
(QFD Matrix 3)
System
CTQs
Operational
Characteristics
Design
Characteristics
(QFD Matrix 1)
Design
Characteristics
Functional
Requirements
House of
Quality
Functional
Requirements
Process
Requirements
Customer
CTQs
Customer
Requirements
Process
Requirements
House of
Quality
(QFD Matrix 4)
Control
CTQs
CTQ = Critical-To-Quality
9
Two Reasons You May
Feel Sleepy
Melatonin Factoids
The Hormone Melatonin
Adenosine
http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/a/a_11/a_11_m/a_11_m_cyc/a_11_m_cyc.html
http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/i/i_03/i_03_m/i_03_m_par/i_03_m_par_cafeine.html
Stress Effects on Cognition
How does fatigue affect performance?
The Yerkes-Dodson Law
 High & low stress/arousal can lead to impaired
performance by reducing resource availability
Novice or
Expert or
Stress Effects on Cognition
 If your attention is reduced, information
processing in cognitive capacity will suffer.
The Yerkes-Dodson Law:
Tunneling &
lapsing can
occur here
Fatigue Effects on Cognition
 attentional lapses
 some slowing of information processing
Attention & working memory are
compromised.
Reduced Attentional Resources Cause…
 Lapses in attention
 Slowing of information processing
 Information not processed as ‘deeply’
 Attentional narrowing/tunneling
 “Satisficing”
 Task shedding
 Reliance on automated performance
 Reliance on schemas/templates
Stress Effects on Cognition
 High Arousal or Preoccupation
 Reduced attentional capacity
 Attentional tunneling
 Perceptual
 Working memory
 Reduced working memory capacity
 Less effective memory storage & recall
Compromised: Attention, Working Memory, Retrieval from Long Term Memory
Hancock & Warm’s Model of
Stress Effects on Performance
Stress is operationalized as level of arousal
A - physiological function
B - behavior/performance
C - subjective comfort
D - normative zone
Hancock, P.A. & Szalma, J.L. (2006). Stress and Neuroergonomics. In: R. Parasuraman and M. Rizzo (Eds.),

similar documents