Preventive - University of California, San Francisco

Report
Motivating and
Developing
Others
Beth Mertz, PhD, MA
Preventive and Restorative Dental
Sciences
The Center for Health Professions
University of California,
San Francisco
Session Objectives
• Review general factors important in motivation
of employees
• Understand a specific model for leading the
development and ongoing performance of your
team
• Discuss the six “C’s’ for guiding behavior
• Your goals/questions?
2
3
Motivation
4
Motivation
• Most people want to be successful
• Systems can engage this natural motivation, or
they can extinguish it
• Take a minute and write down what motivates
you?
5
Motivation Factors
Factors leading to extreme dissatisfaction
Factors leading to extreme satisfaction
Achievement
Recognition
Work Itself
Responsibility
Advancement
Growth
Company Policy
Supervision
Relationship with Supervisor
Work Conditions
Salary
Relationship with Peers
-50
Hygiene
-30
-10
10
30
Motivators
Source: Herzberg, F, One More Time: How do you motivate employees, HBR 1990. A meta analysis of 12 studies of critical incidents.
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Keys to Motivation
• Competence – the skills to do the task
successfully, or the ability to gain them
• Meaningfulness – comprehension of the
significance and value of the work
• Choice – some involvement in deciding the
scope of work and how it is to be done
• Progress – feedback on work including
rewards tied to performance*
*http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-leadership/wp/2014/01/27/study-finds-that-basically-every-single-personhates-performance-reviews/
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How many have done, or know of their
type on Myers-Briggs Type Indicator?
ENERGY
• Introversion
(I)
• Extroversion
DATA GATHERING
• iNtuitive
(N)
• Sensing
DECISION MAKING
• Feeling
(F)
• Thinking
ORIENTATION TO WORLD
• Perceiving
(P)
• Judging
(E)
(S)
(T)
(J)
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Leadership in Developing People
•Directive Behavior involves clearly telling people
what to do, how to do it, when to do it and then
closely monitoring behavior. It relates to the task
function of leadership and Thinking (T) in MBTI.
•Supportive Behavior involves listening to people,
providing support and encouragement for their
efforts, and then facilitating their involvement in
problem-solving and decision making. It relates to
the relationship function of leadership and Feeling
(F) in MBTI
9
Hersey / Blanchard Leadership Model
• Analyze situation
• Chose right leadership style for :
– Individual you are working with
– Task at hand
• Model frames tasks and relationships in the
context of the skills and motivations of the
follower
• Model is developmental
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Hersey / Blanchard Leadership Model
Exercise
• Chose a direct
report or mentee
• What one task is
the person
working on?
• Which leadership
behavior does
this person need
from you right
now?
• Which behavior
are you
providing?
Empowering
Coaching
Follower is capable and
experienced, but may lack
motivation or confidence
for independent action.
Leader steps back from
operational details and joins
decisions as needed.
Follower has improved
competence and skills and is
applying them in new
situations; is beginning to
see context.
Leader defines roles and
tasks and asks for input.
Delegating
Follower is experienced and
accomplished; acts
independently.
Leader is involved with
strategic direction, problem
solving but control with
follower.
Directing
Follower is new to position
or work; may lack skills
needed and emotional
connection to work.
Leader defines work,
teaches skills, make
decisions
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H/B as a Development Model
High
Empower
•Relates to job
and task
Coach
• Exit at any
point
•Keep
development
paths full and
dispersed
Delegate
Direct
High
Low
Task Focused Directive Behavior
12
Blanchard Leadership Model
High
Structuring/Directing:
The leader provides
specific direction and
closely monitors task
accomplishment
Low
Low
High
Task Focused Directive Behavior
Blanchard Leadership Model
High
Coaching: The leaders
continues to direct and closely
monitor task accomplishment,
but also explains decisions,
solicits suggestions, and
supports progress
Structuring/Directing:
The leader provides
specific direction and
Structuring/
closely
monitors task
accomplishment
Directing
Low
Low
High
Task Focused Directive Behavior
Blanchard Leadership Model
High
Supporting: The leader
facilitates and supports
people's efforts toward task
accomplishments and shares
responsibility for decision
making with them.
Coaching: The leaders
continues to direct and closely
monitor task accomplishment,
but also
explains decisions,
Coaching
solicits suggestions, and
supports progress
Structuring/Directing:
The leader provides
specific direction and
Structuring/
closely
monitors task
accomplishment
Directing
Low
Low
High
Task Focused Directive Behavior
Blanchard Leadership Model
High
Supporting: The leader
facilitates and supports
people's efforts toward task
accomplishments and shares
responsibility for decision
making with them.
Coaching: The leaders
continues to direct and closely
monitor task accomplishment,
but also
explains decisions,
Coaching
solicits suggestions, and
supports progress
Delegating: The leader turns
over responsibility for
decision-making and problem
solving to people
Structuring/Directing:
The leader provides
specific direction and
Structuring/
closely
monitors task
accomplishment
Directing
Low
Low
High
Task Focused Directive Behavior
Common Errors
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Moving to Coaching when the competence or
skills can’t be learned.
Too long or too crowded in the Coaching
box.
Moving directly from Directing to Delegating.
Inadequate distribution of people in all boxes
Thinking that Delegating for one thing is
Delegating for all things.
Falsely imprisoning in Delegating when they
want to leave
Others?
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Six Cs for Guiding Behavior
• Common Context
– Similar view of the end game/success
– Shared values, culture, expectations
– Comprehensive
– Both give and receive feedback
• How do you provide a Common Context?
• What areas might you improve on?
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Six Cs for Guiding Behavior
• Clear Goals and Process
– Linked to common context
– Understood
– Specific/written
– Shared/of interest to us both
– Systematic and universal
• Are you better at context or goals?
• What is the cost of over-emphasizing one
over the other?
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Six Cs for Guiding Behavior
• Capability
– Skills in place
– Attitudes aligned
– Willing to make the effort
• How does your organization
stumble around capability?
• Who assesses your capability and gives
you feedback?
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Six Cs for Guiding Behavior
• Coaching
– Recognizes gain
– Focused on improvement
– Instructive
– Balance of reason and emotion
– Informal and frequent
• What attributes do you have that make you
a good coach?
• Where have you stumbled as a coach?
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Six Cs for Guiding Behavior
• Confrontation
– On a specific goal, commitment or
behavior
– Real data on performance or behavior
and its impact on you or others
– No speculation on your part as to
motivation
• What are your strengths and
weaknesses around confronting
others?
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Six Cs for Guiding Behavior
• Consequences
– Rewards
– Sanctions
– Consistency
• What are your favorite ways of
rewarding?
• How do you remain objective when
you use consequences?
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Getting It Done
• Know each person
• Set goals
• Develop a plan
• Use stretch experiences
• Allocate time and resources
• Raise and address hard issues
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More Information At
HTTP://FUTUREHEALTH.UCSF.EDU
For more information, please contact: UCSF Center for the Health Professions
3333 California Street, Suite 410, San Francisco, CA 94118 Phone: 415/476-8181
[email protected]
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