View PowerPoint presentation - Communication Across the

Report
Where Do We Go From Here?
Developmental English
Course Re-Design at LSC-M
Dr. Barbara Buchanan, Instructional Dean
Beverley Turner, Developmental English, Chair
Elizabeth Pena, Assistant Professor of English
EuraDell Davis, Assistant Professor of English
Dr. Lana Myers, Professor of English
Communication
Across the
Curriculum
October 24, 2012
Presentation Agenda
• Where we started
• Where we are now
• Where we want to go
The Problem
• Nationwide, Developmental students
experience low success, completion, and
retention rates
• Developmental Education Research Suggests:
•
“Among those who take remedial classes, the more
remedial coursework taken [is associated] with the
least likelihood of educational success” (Russell,
2008, p. 3).
•
“About one-quarter of all students referred to three
levels below college level for both math and reading
drop out between courses” (Bailey, 2009, p. 14).
A First Step to Course Re-Design
Demonstration Projects Grant
• LSC-M Receives Developmental Education
Demonstration Project (DEDP) Grant Award (Two year
grant - Summer 2010 through Summer 2012)
• Five Texas community colleges received a DEDP grant from the
Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) in July 2010
• LSC-Montgomery is the only single-college campus to receive
funding
• Original award $1.5 million
Vision for the DEDP Grant:
• To accelerate and encourage students’ progress and success in the
developmental sequence and support their transition into creditbearing academic/technical certification programs or degrees
A First Step to Course Re-Design
Demonstration Projects Grant
(Cont.)
DEDP Goals
1. Increase developmental student success
2. Accelerate the progress of students through the developmental
sequence
3. Increase organizational capacity to provide student advising,
counseling and mentoring
4. Provide professional development for training and support of
developmental education faculty, counselors, advisors, and
mentors
Status of Developmental
English Prior to DEDP Grant
•
Zero full-time faculty were100% dedicated to Developmental English
– Selected full-time faculty typically taught 1 DE course per semester
– The remainder of the sections were taught by adjuncts
•
Little professional development available which focused on Developmental
English
•
Reading and writing were taught as separate courses with specialized
curricula, syllabi, and textbooks
– Two levels of reading (ENGL 0304 and ENGL 0305)
– Two levels of writing (ENGL 0306 and ENGL 0307)
•
A homegrown, faculty developed lab comprised the 1 hour lab component of
the course
•
There were few opportunities for accelerating the Developmental sequence
Developmental English
Department’s DEDP
Curriculum Re-Design
Fall 2010 to Present
• Additional Linked / Accelerated class options for students:
• HUMD and EDUC 1300 linked to 0309 or 0302 (4 sections) (fall 2012)
• All four Dev. English classes + 1 student success course (fall 2010; fall 2011)
• One upper-level Dev. English reading or writing course combined with speech, psychology, or
sociology
• Gateway Developmental English (Developmental Writing II) paired with Composition and
Rhetoric I (college-level English)
• Developmental Writing Review (four week course) paired with Composition and Rhetoric I (12
weeks of college-level English)
• Integrated Reading and Writing Courses
•
•
Integrated Reading and Writing I (ENGL 0302)
Advanced Developmental Reading and Writing (ENGL 0309)
Genesis of Integrated Reading
and Writing at LSC-M
• Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) charge
(Granting agency):
• Combine upper-level reading and writing to accelerate
students’ progress through the developmental sequence
• During the DEDP grant, all five DEDP colleges piloted upperlevel IRW courses with identical:
•
•
•
•
•
Textbooks (Bedford textbooks)
Syllabi
Learning Outcomes
Curricula
Lab Software (from Bedford)
Integrated Reading and Writing
at LSC-M (Cont.)
• College and Universities Combining Reading and Writing
– All five DEDP colleges
•
•
•
•
•
Lone Star College – Montgomery
Alamo Colleges
El Paso Community College
San Jacinto College
Tarrant County College
– Other institutions across the country
•
•
•
•
•
UT Austin
UT Pan American
San Francisco State University
Chabot College (California)
North Carolina Community Colleges
Integrated Reading and Writing
at LSC-M (Cont.)
Two new, integrated courses developed:
• ENGL 0302: Integrated Reading and Writing I (full-scale in fall 2012)
•
[Dev. Writing I (0306) + Dev. Reading I (0304)]
• ENGL 0309: Advanced Developmental Reading and Writing
(piloted spring 2011, fall 2011, and spring 2012; full-scale in fall 2012)
• [Dev. Writing II (0307) + Dev. Reading II (0305)]
• Each course meets four hours per week – 3 lecture; 1 hour lab
(An additional hour of classwork per week is required to be completed in
the Dev. English Homework Lab – 10% of students’ grade)
Integrated Reading and Writing
at LSC-M (Cont.)
• Scaling of Integrated Reading and
Writing Pilots
• Spring 2011 – 25 students; 2 sections (ENGL 0309)
• Fall 2011 – 60 students; 3 sections (ENGL 0309)
• Spring 2012 – 44 students; 3 sections (ENGL 0309)
• Fall 2012 (44 sections; 850+ students; 20 student cap)
• 6 sections (ENGL 0302)
• 38 sections (ENGL 0309)
Dev. English Classrooms
and Class Caps
• Dev. English Computer Classrooms - 24 computers each
• Class caps
• Previously - 24 students
• Starting in fall 2012 - 20 students
Dev. English
Course Sections Prior to
Full-Scale IRW
Fall 2011 Courses
# of sections
ENGL 0112: Developmental Writing Review
ENGL 0304: Developmental Reading I
ENGL 0305: Developmental Reading II
ENGL 0306: Developmental Writing I
ENGL 0307: Developmental Writing II
ENGL 0309: Advanced Developmental RW
0
6
12
6
13
3
COMBINED TOTAL
40 Sections
Spring 2012 Courses
# of sections
ENGL 0112: Developmental Writing Review
ENGL 0304: Developmental Reading 1
ENGL 0305: Developmental Reading II
ENGL 0306: Developmental Writing I
ENGL 0307: Developmental Writing II
ENGL 0309: Advanced Developmental RW
1
3
12
8
15
3
COMBINED TOTAL
42 Sections
6 course
options
Dev. English
Course Sections after
Full-Scale IRW
Fall 2012
ENGL 0302
ENGL 0302
ENGL 0309
ENGL 0309
ENGL 0309
5 sections F2F at MC
1 sections F2F at Conroe Center
30 sections F2F at MC
4 sections F2F at Conroe Center
4 Sections online
Total:
44 sections
Spring 2013 (Planned)
ENGL 0302
ENGL 0302
ENGL 0309
ENGL 0309
ENGL 0309
6 sections F2F at MC
1 sections F2F at Conroe Center
28 sections F2F
6 sections F2F at Conroe Center
4 Sections online
Total:
45 sections
2 course
options
Cost and Time Savings of
IRW
• Cost and time savings for students in the
integrated classes
• ENGL 0302:
•
1 semester of time; $256 for the tuition for one, four hour class; $80 textbook;
and transportation expenses
• ENGL 0309:
• 1 semester of time; $256 for the tuition for one, four hour class; $80
textbook; and transportation expenses
• Students who complete both 0302 and 0309
•
2 semesters of time; $512 for the tuition for two, four hour classes; $160 in
textbooks; and transportation expenses
Theoretical Shift
to Integrated Reading and
Writing
• “Better writers tend to read more than poorer writers and better readers tend to
produce more mature prose than poorer readers” (Goen-Salter, 2012, p. 3).
• “Some particular writing experiences teach students to be more effective readers”
(Salvatori, 1996)
• “When reading and writing are taught as separate subjects, these beneficial effects
[generative effects of reading on writing] are all but lost” (McCormick, 1994).
• Research suggests that there is an especially beneficial effect to combining writing
with reading activities (Graham & Perin, 2007).
• Tierney et al. (1989) notes that "reading and writing in combination have the
potential to contribute in powerful ways to thinking.”
• Langer (1986) purports, "When writing essays, students seem to step back from the
text after reading it - they reconceptualize the content in ways that cut across ideas,
focusing on larger issues or topics. In doing this, they integrate information and
engage in more complex thought.”
Marketing IRW Courses
19
Two, Permanent Full-Time Dev.
English Faculty Hired
• 17 Full-time faculty in the English
Department
• Starting fall 2012, two, permanent, fulltime faculty hired and dedicated to DE
• Course load for full-time DE faculty is four
courses per semester
• Other full-time English faculty teach one,
or more, DE courses per semester
• Approximately 20 adjuncts teach DE
New In-Class and
Out-of-Class Labs
•
Transition from In-Class “Homegrown Labs” to Online Labs
• In fall 2011, 50% of instructors used MyReadingLab / MyWriting Lab; 50% used “InHouse” labs
• In spring 2012, comparative data prompted transition to 100% use of online labs
(lab paid for by grant)
• In fall 2012, students purchased lab codes for Aplia Lab (Cengage product) with
their Cengage textbooks
•
Starting in fall 2012, students are required to complete an extra lab
hour in the Developmental English Lab (G 202/203) each week
• Students are assigned a lab software as determined by faculty
cohort structure:
• MySkillsLab – Pearson Product
• USA Today Program – Reading and writing about current events
• Aplia – Cengage Product
Drop Policy Change
Spring 2011 to summer 2012
– Drop-Policy Change – spring 2011 – summer 2012,
students with 8 hours of absences (two weeks of class)
were dropped for non-attendance
• Fall 2012
– Drop-Policy Change
– starting in Fall 2012,
students are not dropped after the census date. They
will remain on the roll and earn an “F.”
Concurrent Enrollment in
Credit Courses
Fall 2012
• Developmental students were encouraged to enroll in credit
course options while concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0302 or
ENGL 0309
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ARTS 1301, 1311, 1316, 2346
DANC 2336
DRAM 1310, 2366
MUSI 1306
SPCH 1311, 1315, 1318
MATH- any level
HIST 1301, 1302
COSC 1401
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Any KINE course
PSYC 2301
SOCI 1301
SPAN 1411, 1412
ITAL 1411, 1412
FREN 1411, 1412
PHIL 1301
HUMA 1301
ITSC 1401
Standard Syllabi for
IRW Courses
Fall 2012
• All faculty teaching 0302 or 0309 follow a standard
syllabus and, in general, teach the same concepts
during each module
• The syllabus is divided into four, four-week modules
and the modules reflect the learning outcomes for the course
• The curriculum requires three essays, a final exam combining reading
and writing, and multiple reading/writing assignments throughout the
course of a semester
• The textbooks for the course are Fusion I and Fusion 2
by Cengage
New Focus on
Affective Efficacies
• Beverley Turner, Chair of Developmental English, developed a
methodology for engaging students’ self strategies for affective
efficacy.
• These strategies are
incorporated into all
IRW courses.
Themes and Novels in
IRW Courses
Themes and novels used in some sections starting in
fall 2012
•
•
•
•
EuraDell Davis
Theme: The Olympic Spirit: Motivational Coaching for Life
Novel: Making the Most of Your Life: Eight Motivational Stories and Essays
Lori Hughes
Theme: Education and Its Impact
Novel: Waiting for Superman: How We Can Save America's Failing Public Schools. Editor Karl
Weber
•
•
•
Lana Myers
Theme: Our Furry Friends, Reading and Writing about Animals
Novels: The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein and In the Shadow of Man by Jane Goodall
•
Elizabeth Pena
Theme: Finding Your Adventure
Novels: Drive by Daniel Pink and Wild by Cheryl Strayed
•
Faculty Mentoring
Fall 2012
• Full-time faculty were asked to serve as mentors to groups
of 4-5 adjunct faculty
–
–
–
–
–
–
Beverley Turner
EuraDell Davis
Elizabeth Pena
Lana Myers
Lori Hughes
Martina Kusi-Mensah
• Cohorts offer support and resources for adjunct faculty
• Cohorts meet, on average, twice per month face-to-face
• Cohort groups also communicate via Angel groups and via
email
Professional
Development
• Integrated Reading and Writing Workshops
• March 23, 2012 (29 attendees) new concepts design for LSC-Montgomery
developmental English courses
• April 13, 2012 (26 attendees) teaching strategies for the integrated reading
and writing class, including assessments, assignments, and affective
concerns
• April 27, 2012 (26 attendees) Leta Deithloff, Ph. D., University of Texas,
spoke about “Creating Meaningful Learning Experiences in the Reading and
Writing Classroom.”
• Summer Institute at Lone Star College – Montgomery
• Wednesday, July 11 – Thursday, July 12, 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
• Featured speaker: Dr. Sugie Goen-Salter - Integrated Reading and Writing
Expert from San Francisco State University
• Sessions include: Integrating Reading and Writing – Theoretical
Background, Pedagogy, and Hands-On Classroom Strategies for Integration
Professional Development
(Cont.)
• San Francisco State University (SFSU) – Site Visit, Oct. 7-9, 2012
• Romana Cortese, Martina Kusi-Mensah, and Lana Myers
performed a site visit at SFSU which included discussions with a
leader in the field (Dr. Sugie Goen-Salter), classroom observations,
and one-on-one Q&A with IRW instructors.
• Kingwood College – IRW Workshop, Nov. 2, 2012
• Beverley Turner, EuraDell Davis, and Elizabeth Pena will present
an overview of LSC-M’s IRW program
• Houston Community College – IRW Panel
• Elizabeth Pena and EuraDell Davis will provide background and
context for IRW coursework at LSC-M
Professional Development
(Cont.)
• Graduate Coursework
•
As a cohort, faculty have pursued 12 hours of graduate coursework in Developmental
Reading / Developmental Education from Texas State University - San Marcos; some of the
coursework applies to a Certificate in Developmental Education offered by TSU-SM.
•
•
•
•
Summer 2010: Five ENGL faculty completed RDG 5320 Foundations of Literacy Instruction
Fall 2011: Five ENGL faculty completed READ 5324 Content Literacy
Spring 2012: Three ENGL faculty enroll in DE 5324 Teaching Learning Strategies and Critical
Thinking
Fall 2012: Two ENGL faculty plan to complete DE 5375 The Underprepared Learner in
Postsecondary Education
• Strategies learned through the graduate coursework are shared with
FT and PT faculty through Dev. English workshops
• Three faculty are pursuing the 15 hour Developmental Education
Certificate
– Elizabeth Pena
– Lana Myers
– Lori Hughes
Continuous Evaluation
•
Faculty Survey
• The DE faculty were surveyed in mid October 2012 to gain faculty
perspectives and suggestion concerning the labs, the textbook,
the software, the syllabus, etc.
•
Student Survey
• Over 90 students were surveyed in mid October 2012 to gain
student perspectives and suggestion concerning the labs, the
textbook, the software, the syllabus, etc.
•
Faculty Meetings held throughout the semester
•
Cohort group meetings held throughout the semester
Average Number of DE
Courses Taken by Students
Average Number of DE Courses taken by students
Fall 2008 - Spring 2012
Number of DE Courses
Completed
Total
Number of Unique Students Taking DE Number of Students Completing
Courses
DE Courses
1
1792
1792
2
795
1590
3
181
543
4
102
408
5
2
10
2872
4343
Average Number of DE Courses taken by students
1.5
Pre-IRW, Reading I to Reading II
and Writing I to Writing II Success
Rates
ENGL 0305 success rate after ENGL 0304 Completion
Fall 2008 - Spring 2012
Subject
Course
Enrollment
ENGL
305
306
Completion
247
81%
Success
204
67%
A
B
C
D
F
I
IP
W
NR
48
90
66
2
41
0
16
43
0
ENGL 0307 success rate after ENGL 0306 Completion
Fall 2008 - Spring 2012
Subject
Course
Enrollment
ENGL
307
467
Completion
388
83%
Success
320
69%
A
B
C
D
F
I
IP
W
NR
78
155
87
4
64
1
19
59
0
ENGL 1301 Success Rate after
completion of 1 to 4 DE
Courses
ENGL 1301 success rate after completion of any one DE English Course
Fall 2008 - Spring 2012
Subject Course Enrollment Completion
ENGL
1301
1241
1054
85%
Success
730
59%
A
B
C
D
F
I
IP
W
NR
238
305
187
71
253
1
0
186
0
ENGL 1301 success rate after completion of any two DE English Courses
Fall 2008 - Spring 2012
Subject Course Enrollment Completion
ENGL
1301
566
493
87%
Success
343
61%
A
B
C
D
F
I
IP
W
NR
96
155
92
46
104
0
0
73
0
ENGL 1301 success rate after completion of any three DE English Courses
Fall 2008 - Spring 2012
Subject Course Enrollment Completion
ENGL
1301
130
111
85%
Success
74
57%
A
B
C
D
F
I
IP
W
NR
17
32
25
8
29
0
0
19
0
ENGL 1301 success rate after completion of any four DE English Courses
Fall 2008 - Spring 2012
Subject Course Enrollment Completion
ENGL
1301
87
76
87%
Success
47
54%
A
B
C
D
F
I
IP
W
NR
6
21
20
7
22
0
0
11
0
ENGL 1301 Success Rates
No DE Courses vs. At Least 1
DE Course
English 1301 Success Rate with No DE Courses and with at least one DE Course taken
Fall 2010 - Summer 2011
Semester
Fall 2008
Spring 2009
Summer 2009
Fall 2009
Spring 2010
Summer 2010
Fall 2010
Spring 2011
Summer 2011
Fall 2011
Spring 2012
Summer 2012
Average
ENGL 1301 with No Development English Course Taken
ENGL 1301 with at least one Development English Course Taken
UnSuccessful
Successful
Successful
UnSuccessful
Enrollment
Non Completers Enrollment
Non Completers
Completers
Completers
Completers
Completers
1822
714
297
1923
1013
311
2183
971
366
2229
848
322
12999
#
1314
432
231
1384
575
246
1552
526
302
1621
487
266
8936
%
72%
61%
78%
72%
57%
79%
71%
54%
83%
73%
57%
83%
69%
#
314
174
41
332
250
47
402
283
39
401
220
35
2538
%
17%
24%
18%
17%
25%
15%
18%
29%
11%
18%
26%
11%
20%
#
194
108
25
207
188
18
229
162
25
207
141
21
1525
%
11%
25%
8%
11%
19%
6%
10%
17%
7%
9%
17%
7%
12%
347
385
96
397
562
119
453
562
115
414
541
93
4084
#
208
235
67
245
336
71
268
325
79
247
297
64
2442
%
60%
61%
70%
62%
60%
60%
59%
58%
69%
60%
55%
69%
60%
#
88
100
20
85
139
35
119
153
17
115
154
15
1040
%
25%
26%
21%
21%
25%
29%
26%
27%
15%
28%
28%
16%
25%
#
51
50
9
67
87
13
66
84
19
52
90
14
602
%
15%
21%
9%
17%
15%
11%
15%
15%
17%
13%
17%
15%
15%
Aggregate Data – Baseline
Data Vs. Cohort Data
Aggregate Data - Development Education English Courses - Baseline v/s. Cohort
Baseline - Fall 2008 - Summer 2010 - Cohort - Fall 2010 - Summer 2012
BaseLine - Data (Fall 2008 - Summer 2010)
Cohort - Data (Fall 2011 - Summer 2012)
Subject
Course
Enrollment
Successful
Completers
UnSuccessful
Completers
Non Completers
#
%
#
%
#
%
Enrollment
Successful
Completers
UnSuccessful
Completers
Non Completers
#
%
#
%
#
%
ENGL
304
313
174
56%
72
23%
67
21%
438
306
70%
57
13%
75
17%
ENGL
305
1022
687
67%
130
13%
205
20%
1184
760
64%
162
14%
262
22%
ENGL
306
539
274
51%
138
26%
127
24%
611
364
60%
107
18%
140
23%
ENGL
307
2075
1335
64%
406
20%
332
16%
1979
1373
69%
284
14%
320
16%
ENGL
309
165
121
73%
16
10%
28
17%
ENGL
1301
9097
6033
66%
1953
21%
1101
12%
7556
5027
67%
1543
20%
975
13%
Developmental Education
English Courses Success Rate
Fall 2011 - Summer 2012
Development Education English Courses Success Rate
Fall 2011 - Summer 2012
Fall 2011
Spring 2012
Successful UnSuccessful
Successful UnSuccessful
Enrollment Completers Completers Enrollment Completers Completers Enrollment
#
%
#
%
#
%
#
%
ENGL
304
151
106 70%
20
13%
53
34
64%
7
13%
ENGL
305
323
194 60%
44
14%
218
127 58%
42
19%
35
ENGL
306
198
122 62%
32
16%
101
63
62%
10
10%
ENGL
307
439
309 70%
51
12%
363
243 67%
51
14%
83
ENGL
309
66
49 74%
5
8%
43
32
74%
2
5%
31
Total DE Courses
1177
780 66% 152
13%
778
499 64% 112
14%
149
Subject
Course
Summer 2012
Successful UnSuccessful
Completers Completers
#
%
#
%
32
91%
0
0%
67
24
123
81%
77%
83%
6
2
8
7%
6%
5%
Pursuing NADE
Certification
• Developmental English is pursuing
National Association for Developmental
Education (NADE) Certification
– Data collected and analyzed by Rajiv Malkan
– Application materials should be submitted by late November 2012
– In four-to-six months, a review team will follow-up with LSC-M to
ask additional questions and, possibly, perform a site visit
Continue Pedagogical
Shift
• Continue to Shift DE pedagogy to more intensely
focus on:
• Affective Efficacies
• Integration of reading and writing skills
• Avoid: reading to write and writing to read (separate skills)
• Self-regulatory behaviors
• Learning skills
Continue Focus on
Professional Development
• Continue focus on professional development
through:
• Workshops
• Cohort groups
• Conference presentations
• CASP / CRLA Conference, November 7-9, 2012
• NADE Conference, March 2013
Continue to Monitor Dev.
English Data
• Continue to monitor Developmental English data for
success, retention, and completion information
Questions?
_________________
Thank you for your time!
43
Bibliography
Bibliography
•
•
•
•
•
Bailey, T. (2009). Challenge and opportunity: Rethinking the role and function of
developmental education in community college. New Directions for Community
Colleges, (145), 11-30.
Goen-Salter, S. (2012). The Conversion to IRW "Stretch" English at San Francisco
State University. Unpublished paper.
Graham, S., & Perin, D. (2007). Writing next: Effective strategies to improve writing of
adolescents in middle and high schools - A report to Carnegie Corporation of New
York. Washington, DC: Alliance for Excellent Education.
Langer, J. (1986). Learning through writing: Study skills in the content areas. Journal
of Reading, 29, 400-406.
McCormick, K. (1994). In The Culture of Reading and the Teaching of English. New
York: Manchester University Press.
Bibliography (Cont.)
Bibliography (Continued)
•
•
•
•
Russell, A. (2008, August). Enhancing college student success through dev
elopmental education. American Association of State Colleges and Universit
ies: Higher Education Policy Brief. Washington, DC: American Association o
f State Colleges and Universities. Salvatori, M. (1996). “Introspective
Reading: Conversations With Texts.” College English, 55.4: 19-36.
Stotsky, S. “Research on Reading/writing Relationships: A Synthesis and
Suggested Directions.” Composing and Comprehending. Ed. J. Jensen
(Urbana, IL: Eric Clearninghouse on Reading and Communication Skills and
NCRE. 1984. 7-22.
Tierney,R., Soter, A., O'Flahavan, J., & W. McGinley. (1989). The effects of
reading and writing upon thinking critically. Reading Research Quarterly,
24, 134-173.
Zamel, V. (1992). “Writing One’s Way into Reading.” TESOL Quarterly,
26.3: 463-85.

similar documents