Intro to NGSS PPT (Nov 2012)

Report
Introduction to the
Next Generation
Science Standards
November 12, 2012
Kevin J. B. Anderson, Ph.D.
CESA #2 STEM Education Consultant
1
Welcome!
… to the CESA #2 workshop on the Next
Generation Science Standards.
Take 3.14 minutes to introduce yourself at your
table and discuss:
1) Your comfort level with the NGSS (from “no
idea” to “I’m already aligned”)
2) Your goals for today’s meeting
3) Person with nearest b-day will share out
2
Some goals for the day include:
• Becoming more familiar and comfortable with
the NGSS
• Connecting curriculum and instruction to the
science and engineering practices
• Connecting curriculum and instruction ideas
within the nature of science
• Becoming more able to integrate engineering
design principles in science lessons
• Exploring possible assessments for the
3
NGSS
Norms and Agenda
• Meeting norms
• Overview of the day
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NGSS background and structure
NGSS practices
Integrating practices – example 1
Nature of science
Integrating practices – example 2
NGSS assessments
Next steps
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What are we building upon?
5
You’ve probably seen this A-H list.
A-Science Connections
B-Nature of Science
C-Science Inquiry
D-Physical Science
E-Earth and Space Science
F-Life and Environmental Science
G-Science Applications
H-Science in Personal and Social Perspectives
6
Research on learning has moved
Forward.
7
What helps you learn?
8
Connect to prior knowledge.
9
Build an explicit context
10
Emphasize concepts over facts
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Reflect on your learning
12
Research grew into a framework.
13
The framework guides the NGSS.
“90% of what is in the
Framework will be in the
NGSS”
--Stephen Pruitt
14
The standards integrate 3 dimensions.
15
Without referring to any resource,
what would you say are the key
things you want students to learn
in your class?
• Share at your table (3 min).
• Each table will be assigned one practice.
• On chart paper:
• What does it not look like?
• What does it look like (examples)?
• Put it in your own words.
16
Let’s share out our ideas on the
practices.
• Post your chart paper.
• Take a few minutes and walk around to see
what other groups put down – gallery walk.
17
Why is it useful to have overarching
themes in the science we teach K-12?
7 Crosscutting concepts:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Patterns
Cause and effect: Mechanism and explanation
Scale, proportion, and quantity
Systems and system models
Energy and matter: Flow, cycles, and
conservation
6. Structure and function
7. Stability and change
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Break
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The standards have more focused
content.
20
Standards have a consistent format.
21
Sample activity – what might
teaching one of these standards
look like?
• Handout and materials
• Write ideas and answers in your “notebook.”
22
How would you incorporate
engineering?
• Handout…
23
How could we improve this
assignment?
• What connections to science and engineering
practices are there and how could you
connect to others?
• What crosscutting concepts are there and
how can you make them explicit?
• Are there other content areas you might
connect to?
24
What’s changing for the second
draft of the standards?
• Addition of explicit “Nature of Science” boxes
• Better integration of engineering design ideas
into the performance expectations.
• Fewer performance expectations.
• Supporting documents:
•
•
•
Course pathways for MS and HS.
Storylines-paragraphs describing an individual
grade science flow
College and career readiness
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What does it mean when someone
talks about the nature of science?
•
Jigsaw – number off from 1 to 5 (or 6)
1) Intro and Scientific World View (p. 1 – 2)
2) Scientific Inquiry (to Science Explains, p. 2 – mid
4)
3) Scientific Inquiry (second half, p. mid 4 – 5)
4) Scientific Enterprise (to There are Generally
Accepted…, p. 5 – mid 7)
5) There are Generally Accepted to end (p. mid 7 to
end).
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6) Google – myths of the nature of science by
McComas – skim it!
Sample nature of science
statements from the 2nd draft
K.WC
Scientific Investigations Use a Variety of
Methods to Produce New Knowledge
• Science uses different ways to study the
world.
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Sample nature of science
statements from the 2nd draft
1.SFIP
Science is a Human Endeavor Influenced by
Context, Society, and Culture
• People have practiced science for a long
time. (SFIP.f)
• Men and women are scientists and engineers.
(SFIP.f)
28
Sample nature of science
statements from the 2nd draft
4.IVT
Scientific Knowledge is Based on Empirical
Evidence
• Science findings are based upon locating
patterns in measurements and observations.
(IVT.a)
29
Sample nature of science
statements from the 2nd draft
MS.CR
Science uses models, mechanisms, theories,
and laws to explain natural systems
• Science knowledge is presented in different
forms such as hypotheses, theories, and
laws. (CR.a)
30
Sample nature of science
statements from the 2nd draft
MS.IRE
Science is Limited, it Cannot Answer All
Questions
• Scientific knowledge is constrained by human
capacities and technologies. (IRE.g)
• Science limits its explanations to systems that
lend themselves to observation and empirical
evidence. (IRE.g)
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Sample nature of science
statements from the 2nd draft
HS.MEOE
Science Findings are Tentative and Subject
to Revision
• Science theories are subject to revision when
new evidence or new models emerge.
(MEOE.h)
• Most scientific knowledge is quite durable, but
is, in principle, subject to change based on 32
new evidence. (MEOE.h)
Lunch
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Storylines - example
4.ESP Earth’s Surface Processes
Students use the information gained in 2.ESP to further
develop their understanding of the processes that shape
Earth. They investigate the effect of wind, water, living
organisms, and gravity on the rate of weathering and
erosion and the resulting impact on Earth’s surface. They
use rock formation and rock layers to explain how Earth’s
surface has changed over time. They collaborate to design,
test, and refine solutions to mitigate the impact of
weathering and erosion on physical features in their local
areas. Through analysis of maps, they use patterns to
determine the likelihood of geological hazards (e.g.,
volcanoes, earthquakes) occurring in different locations and
evaluate the possible consequences to organisms in those
areas. Recognizing that humans cannot eliminate these 34
hazards, they construct and test research-based solutions
designed to mitigate the effects.
What is engineering?
35
A Google search of engineers…
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A Google search of scientists…
37
People are confused about engineering.
38
People are confused about engineering.
39
People are confused about engineering.
40
There are many types of engineering.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Biomedical Engineering
Chemical and Biological Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Engineering Professional Development
Geological Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Limnology and Marine Science Program
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Materials Science Program
Engineering Physics (e.g., Nuclear)
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Biological Systems Engineering
41
In Wisconsin, you can get an
“engineering” degree at:
• UW-Madison
• UW-Platteville
• UW-Milwaukee
• Milwaukee School of Engineering
• Marquette
42
How do engineers define their profession?
• “In general… there is usually [a client who] comes to
us with a problem…, an issue that needs to be dealt
with.”
• “I think an engineer is really just a problem solver.
Someone who can look at a situation objectively and
use their knowledge and skills to brainstorm
solutions.”
• “It’s not just designing of products eight hours a
day. That’s a couple weeks of a six month or one
year project. The rest of it you are spending
developing,… writing specifications [and] detailing
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the products.”
How does the NGSS differentiate science
and engineering practices?
Scientists:
•
•
•
•
•
Ask questions
Develop/use models
Plan/execute investigations
Analyze/interpret data
Use math and science
knowledge
• Construct explanations
• Engage in argument from
evidence
• Obtain, evaluate,
communicate
Engineers:
•
•
•
•
•
Define problems
Develop/use models
Plan/execute investigations
Analyze/interpret data
Use math and science
knowledge
• Design Solutions
• Engage in argument from
evidence
• Obtain, evaluate,
communicate
44
Understanding the natural world vs.
creating the human-made world
• A chemist may work to determine the
chemical composition and structure of a
natural compound
• A chemical engineer may then use the
understanding provided by the chemist to
develop a manufacturing process based on
that substance for a new product. It might
be a medication, an adhesive, a material
with particular electrical properties……
45
How do “engineering” activities often
fall short?
Example #1 – Society of Women Engineers
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How do “engineering” activities often
fall short?
Example #2 – NC DOT
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What is often missing from engineering
activities?
• Iterative design process, refinement
of design
• Societal context
• Application of math and science
concepts
• Collaborative activities instead of
competition
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IDENTIFY PROBLEM
Engineering
Design
Cycle
BRAINSTORM
DESIGN
REDESIGN
BUILD
EVALUATE
TEST
SHARE SOLUTION
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Break
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How can we better integrate engineering
practices into a common activity?
• Task: building rollercoasters!
• Brainstorm: how do we or could we
integrate the science and engineering
practices and crosscutting concepts?
• You design/re-design the activity.
• Share out ideas by group.
51
What might science assessments
look like for the NGSS?
http://nationsreportcard.gov/science_2009/
Explore! Share what you notice at your table.
52
On June 1, a fast growing species of algae is accidentally introduced into a lake in
a city park. It starts to grow and cover the surface of the lake in such a way that
the area covered by the algae doubles every day. If it continues to grow
unabated, the lake will be totally covered and the fish in the lake will suffocate. At
the rate it is growing, this will happen on June 30.
a. When will the lake be covered half-way?
b. On June 26, a pedestrian who walks by the lake every day warns that the lake
will be completely covered soon. Her friend just laughs. Why might her friend be
skeptical of the warning?
c. On June 29, a clean-up crew arrives at the lake and removes almost all of the
algae. When they are done, only 1% of the surface is covered with algae. How
well does this solve the problem of the algae in the lake?
d. Write an equation that represents the percentage of the surface area of the lake
that is covered in algae as a function of time (in days) that passes since the
algae was introduced into the lake.
e. Using the available data, construct an argument that supports or refutes the
problem’s claim that the fish will suffocate if the algae species is allowed to grow
unabated. Your argument should include a discussion regarding resource
availability and other environmental factors specifically including competition for
resources.
f. Given the disturbance created by the algae, design a solution to ensure the
stability of the lake ecosystem. Be sure to include claims with supporting
evidence as to the time needed to return the lake to a stable state and an
analysis of the impact of human intervention on the ecosystem.
Students who demonstrate understanding can:
Construct arguments from evidence about the effects of natural biological or physical disturbances in terms
of the time needed to reestablish a stable ecosystem and how the new system differs from the original
system. [Clarification Statement: Computational models could be used to support collect evidence to support the
argument.]
Science and Engineering Practices
Disciplinary Core Ideas
Crosscutting Concepts
LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, Stability and Change
Engaging in Argument from Evidence
and Resilience
Engaging in argument from evidence in 9Much of science deals with
If a modest biological or physical disturbance to constructing explanations of how
12 builds from K-8 experiences and
an ecosystem occurs, it may return to its more
progresses to using appropriate and
things change and how they
or
less
original
status
(i.e.,
the
ecosystem
is
sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning
remain stable. Change and rates
resilient),
as
opposed
to
becoming
a
very
to defend and critique claims and
of change can be quantified and
different
ecosystem.
explanations about the natural and
modeled over very short or very
designed world. Arguments may also come Extreme fluctuations in conditions or the size of long periods of time. Some
any population, however, can challenge the
from current scientific or historical episodes
system changes are irreversible.
functioning of ecosystems in terms of resources
in science.
Feedback (negative or positive)
and habitat availability.
Construct a counter-argument that is
can stabilize or destabilize a
based in data and evidence that challenges
system. Systems can be designed
In this case,
another proposed argument.
for greater or lesser stability.
•Students
should
examine
the
Evaluate the claims, evidence, and
competitive relationship between the In this case,
reasoning of currently accepted
explanations or solutions as a basis for the fish and algae.
•Students are able to
•Students
should
explain
how
the
merits of arguments.
develop arguments that
In this case,
•A mathematical model to
coherently support the claim
•The model must be reliable and
thoroughly explained
increase in algaae population affects
the oxygen levels in the water.
•The argument should explain
hypothesis and supporting evidence
regarding the recovery of the
ecosystem and the effect of leabing
1% of the algae in the lake.
lead to the stability of the
ecosystem. The argument
and content should address
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the feedback mechanisms
of the ecosystem as well as
the rates of change
Next Steps in NGSS
• Write out your goals relative to the Next
Generation Science Standards for the
remainder of this school year.
Consider: Who will help you accomplish these
goals? What resources might you need?
Discuss as a group.
55
Standards-based vs.
standards-referenced
• What is the first thing groups often do with
new standards?
• Sense of wonder, practices, more important
than content coverage (video)!
56
Review the Day - Key Learning
• Becoming more familiar and comfortable
with the NGSS
• Connecting curriculum and instruction to
the science and engineering practices
• Connecting curriculum and instruction
ideas within the nature of science
• Becoming more able to integrate
engineering design principles in science
lessons
• Exploring possible assessments for the
NGSS
57
Evaluation
Please give me some feedback on this workshop
and let me know what will be helpful moving
forward – (tubes?)
Email me any time:
[email protected]
http://www.cesa2.k12.wi.us/programs/stem/
http://www.nextgenscience.org
58
Video on Science and Play
http://www.ted.com/talks/beau_lotto_amy_o_tool
e_science_is_for_everyone_kids_included.html
Email me any time:
[email protected]
http://www.cesa2.k12.wi.us/programs/stem/
59
http://www.nextgenscience.org

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