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Building Your Future Intensive Training
Meeting Mechanics &
Guiding Principles
WELCOME &
INTRODUCTIONS
Presenters
Visitors
Today’s Itinerary
• Morning:
– Meeting Mechanics: Dave Schoemer
– Teaming Process: Kelly Dunlap
• Afternoon:
– Guiding Principles to Inform Practice:
Kelly Dunlap & Maureen Ziegler
Improving the Journey
• Wait for Team Time to Talk
– Write / share notes
• Cell Phones on Silent
• CONTRIBUTE
– Everyone has a contribution to make
Why Problem Solving Process?
MEETING MECHANICS
Team Process / Team Time
Review Action Items from Module 1
Improving Outcomes through
Improved Educational Practices
GUIDING
Opinions; Opinions; Opinions!!!
Guiding Principles = Herding Cats
Guiding Principle
• NO OPINIONS
• ALL DECISIONS INFORMED BY….
– THE LAW
– THE RESEARCH
– THE DATA
What is FAPE?
IDEA 2004
An educational program that is individualized to a specific
child, designed to meet that child's unique needs,
provides access to the general curriculum, meets the
grade-level standards established by the state, and
from which the child receives educational benefit. 20
U.S.C. §1401(9).
To provide FAPE, schools must provide students with an
education that prepares the child for further education,
employment, and independent living 20 U.S.C.
§1400(c)(5)(A)(i)
National Outcome Data: Housing
• 2008 Easter Seals Study:
– More than 80% of adults with ASD ages 19-30 live at home with their parents;
may of these parents aging.
• Adults 19-30 with Autism
–
–
–
–
–
With parents or guardian 81%
Independently, with spouse or partner 3%
With other family member/spouse/partner 0%
Supported residence for individuals with special needs 14%
Other 2%
• Adults 19-30 with Asperger
–
–
–
–
–
With parents or guardian 71%
Independently, with spouse or partner 9%
With other family member/spouse/partner 5%
Supported residence for individuals with special needs 7%
Other 7%
Easter Seals, 2008
National OUTCOME DATA: Employment
• A University of Wisconsin-Madison 2002 study of 405
adolescents and adults with ASD found that only 10% were in
competitive employment.
• Barnard, et.al. 2001
– As few as 6% of individuals with ASD have fulltime employment
– 12% of individuals with Asperger Syndrome are employed despite
having average or high than average IQs
• 2008 Easter Seals Study (Living with Autism): About 6 in 10
children with ASD aged 16 or older have not looked for work,
yet 75% of typical children are already working.
• Even compared to individuals with other disabilities, the
employment outcomes for individuals with ASD is significantly
lower.
Engagement in education, employment, or training after leaving school
Other health impairment
Learning disability
Speech / language
impairment
Hearing impairment
Emotional disturbance
Traumatic brain injury
Visual impairment
Orthopedic impairment
Mental impairment
Multiple disabilities
Autism
0
NLTS2, 2009
20
40
60
Percentage
80
100
120
What predicts post-school employment?
• Students who had the highest degree of
integration with age-appropriate peers were
more likely to engage in post-school
employment
• IQ, behavior problems, physical disability, and
individual demographics did not correlate with
integrated employment outcome
White, J. & Weiner, J.S. (2004). Influence of least restrictive environment and
community based training on integrated employment outcomes for transitioning
students with severe disabilities. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 21, 149–
156.
Predictors / Outcomes
Education
Employment
Indep. Living
Career Awareness
P (Potential)
P
---------------
Community Experience
---------------
P
---------------
Exit Exam Requirements / High
School Diploma Status
---------------
P
---------------
Inclusion in
General Education
M (Moderate)
M
M
Interagency Collaboration
P
P
---------------
Occupational Courses
P
P
---------------
Paid Employment /
Work Experience
M
M
P
Parental Involvement
---------------
P
---------------
Program of Study
---------------
P
---------------
Self Advocacy / Self Determination
P
P
---------------
Self Care / Independent Living
P
P
M
Social Skills
P
P
---------------
Student Support
P
P
P
Transition Program
M
P
---------------
Vocational Education
M
M
---------------
Work Study
---------------
M
---------------
Do Sheltered Workshops Help
Prepare Individuals with ASD?
•
Two groups compared:
• a) 215 supported employees who were in sheltered workshops prior to entering
supported employment
• b) 215 supported employees who were not in sheltered workshops
•
Groups were matched on primary diagnosis, secondary diagnosis (if present), and
gender.
•
Results showed that there were no differences in rates of employment between the
groups.
•
Individuals who participated in sheltered workshops earned significantly less
($129.36 versus $191.42 per week), and cost significantly more to serve ($6,065.08
versus $2,440.60), than their non-sheltered workshop peers.
•
Results suggest that individuals with ASD achieve better vocational outcomes if
they do not participate in sheltered workshops prior to enrolling in supported
employment.
Cimera, R. E., Wehman, P., West, M., & Brugess, S. (2012). Do sheltered workshops enhance employment outcomes
for adults with autism spectrum disorder? Autism, 16(1) 87–94.
Michigan’s Unique Opportunity: 26
Where are students without disabilities
receiving their education / preparation?
Education
Independent
Living
Employment
“Results will no longer
take a back seat to compliance.”
Eleanor White
Michigan State Director of Special Education (8-13-11)
Accurate? / Reliable?
Aligned with Principles of PersonCentered Planning / SelfDetermination?
Unemployable vs.
Conditions for Employment
Wanna go to
your IEP?
Primary Goals for Students with ASD:
Socialization /
Communication
Independence
Skills do not develop without opportunities!
Academic
(Integrated
Setting)
Behavior /
Independence
Social /
Communication
Dignity of Risk:
Not a “Readiness” Model
• Were YOU Ready?
• Risk Management:
– Know the Risks
– Plan for Risks
– Opportunities
The Push
Guiding Principle:
PRESUME COMPETENCE
Least Dangerous Assumption
High Expectations
Leads to Better Outcomes
The Pygmalion Effect
(Rosenthal & Jacobson, 1968)
Later research:
Expectancy Effect
Madon et al (1997) - teacher
perceptions and expectations
have a greater relative impact
on achievement among low
achievers than among high
achievers.
CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS
Understanding Federal Law
U.S. Code (U.S.C.)
50 Titles
Title 20: Education
78 Chapters
Chapter 33: IDEA — IV Subchapters
Subchapter I: General Provisions
82 Sections -- denoted as §
§ 1400: Findings / Purpose
…the implementation of this chapter (33 : IDEA) has been impeded
by low expectations, and an insufficient focus on applying
replicable research on proven methods of teaching and learning
for children with disabilities.
CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS
• “Almost 30 years of research and experience has demonstrated
that the education of children with disabilities can be made
more effective by –
– having high expectations for such children and ensuring
their access to the general education curriculum in the
regular classroom, to the maximum extent possible, in order
to • (i) meet developmental goals and, to the maximum extent
possible, the challenging expectations that have been
established for all children; and
• (ii) be prepared to lead productive and independent adult
lives, to the maximum extent possible; “
IDEA Congressional Findings
(C) FINDINGS - Congress finds the following:
– (1) Disability is a natural part of the human
experience and in no way diminishes the
right of individuals to participate in or
contribute to society. Improving educational
results for children with disabilities is an
essential element of our national policy of
ensuring equality of opportunity, full
participation, independent living, and
economic self-sufficiency for individuals
with disabilities.
Post-Secondary Transition Outcomes
EMPLOYMENT GUIDING PRINCIPLES
• Allen Anderson: www.employmentoutcomes.com
– “Abandon no one to unemployment.”
• Griffin – Hammis Associates:
– “All people have contributions to make in the
marketplace.”
• Mark Gold & Associates:
– “All people have interests that provide motivation
for employment.”
The Spectrum of ASD
Inclusive Employment Options
Callahan, Michael (2009). Supported
Employment / Customized Employment
Matrix: Is “Competitive the new
“Independent.” Mark Gold & Associates
Competitive /
Demand Employment
Customized
Employment / SelfEmployment
Natural Supports /
Reasonable
Accommodations
Does not need either
SE or CE to become /
stayed employed.
Needs CE to become
employed; Does not need
SE to stay employed
Supported
Employment /
Natural Supports
Does not need CE to
become employed; Needs
SE to stay employed
Needs both CE to
become employed and
SE to stay employed.
“The potential of individuals
with ASD to become employed
and engaged adults is limited
more by the failure of the
systems charged with
supporting them than by the
challenges associated with
being on the spectrum.”
Peter Gerhardt; Current State of Services for
Adults with Autism 2009
IN THE NEWS…July 2012
Unfinished Business:
Making Employment of People with
Disabilities a National Priority
COMMITTEE ON HEALTH, EDUCATION, LABOR & PENSIONS
Tom Harkin, Chairman
http://harkin.senate.gov/documents/pdf/500469b49b364.pdf
Employment First…
 Everyone can work and there is a job for everyone
 Not working should be the exception - all
individuals, schools, families and businesses must raise
their expectations
 People will be hired because of their ability not
because they have a disability
 Communities embrace people who contribute
 People are healthier safer and happiest with
meaningful work
Employment First…
 True employment is not a social service
 Employment is a win/win for everyone
Employment First – New Jersey
http://www.state.nj.us/governor/news/news/552012/app
roved/20120419a.html
Employment First - Minnesota
• “Expecting, encouraging, providing,
creating, and rewarding integrated
employment in the workplace as the
first and preferred option for youth”
Minnesota - Employment First Manifesto, 2007
Employment First - Oregon
• Asking “What will it take?”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=slj1ZA8_A6k
Employment First – How?
•
•
•
•
Better public education
High Expectations for all stakeholders
Policy advocacy
Awareness and education of families
What are students saying about
Employment First?
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qLMuBTEEHs&list=PL041
49A8F40E0B0A0&index=3&feature=plpp_video
Campaign for Disability Employment
JAKE JOHNSON WINNER 2012
Establishing Guiding Principles
ACTION PLAN
• What are the team’s guiding principles
relative to post-secondary outcomes for
students with ASD?
–
–
–
–
Higher Education
Employment
Independent Living
Community Involvement
• Does your behavior & attitude and current
practices and procedures align with those
guiding principles?
V3 DISCOVERY Interview & Survey Tools
Interviews and surveys in the V3 Discovery process are intended to provide the team information from persons
knowledgeable about the student to assist in writing the student’s post-secondary vision, vocational profile,
and/or visual resume. In conducting surveys and interviewing people, it is important to focus on relevant and
positive information including interests and preferences, skills and contributions, experiences, supports and
services, conditions for success, and connections as well as challenges that may impact employment and
independent living.
First, create a list of people who know the student best and take time to brainstorm anyone else to add to the list.
Include peers who the student interacts with in inclusive environments.
Next, determine who will be interviewed and who you will be asking to complete a survey.
Name / Contact Info
Relationship to Student
Survey or Interview?
Person Responsible
There are three survey / interview tools that can be used:
o Discovery Short Survey
o Detailed Discovery Survey / Interview
o Peer Survey
Interviews / Survey Tips:
 You can use the survey forms as a guide to conduct face to face interviews.
 Take time to adapt questions and format in order to maximize information gathering.
 Provide opportunities for people to clarify and expand their responses.
 Listen for the difference between facts and feelings or opinions.
 Keep the interview positive and avoid deficit-driving information gathering.

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