Research_Intro_2014_Bateman

Report
Personal Project
Objective A: Investigating
Objective C: Taking action
Students should:
Students should:
i. define a clear goal and context for
the project, based on personal
interests
ii. identify prior learning and
subject-specific knowledge relevant
to the project
iii. demonstrate research skills.
Objective B: Planning
Students should:
i. develop criteria for the
product/outcome
ii. plan and record the development
process of the project
iii. demonstrate self-management
skills.
i. create a product/outcome in
response to the goal, context and
criteria
ii. demonstrate thinking skills
iii. demonstrate communication and
social skills.
Objective D: Reflecting
Students should:
i. evaluate the quality of the
product/outcome against their criteria
ii. reflect on how completing the
project has extended their knowledge
and understanding of the topic
and the global context
iii. reflect on their development as an
IB learner through the project.
words of wisdom
Follow the
Personal Project
“Project Guide”
Follow the rubric
– you are assessed
by the rubric,
everything you do
should be based
on fulfilling the
rubric
OPVL
Origin
Purpose
Value
Limitations
Research Question &...
Research Question: Facilitates your investigation
Every aspect of your investigation should work to answer the
research question. Answering the research question guides you as
you work to achieve your goal.
“A research question guides and centers your research. It
should be clear and focused, as well as synthesize multiple
sources to present your unique argument...Be careful to
avoid the “all-about” paper and questions that can be
answered in a few factual statements.” –Thompson Writing
Program, Duke University
Ex: Possible research question – “Are females smarter
than males?”
Revised question – “Do females age 18-35 score higher
than adult males age 18-35 on the Wonderlic test?”
Researching a query...
Many ways to research
primary (first-hand account) and secondary(interprets
primary source) sources
diversify – different types of sources
books, letters, news articles, maps, images, media,
social media, diaries, laws, research, textbooks, etc.
Senn Library & Research Databases
GoogleBooks – provides digital copies of many texts
Reverse Engineer Wikipedia – “Reference” section
Wikipedia can be edited by the public so its reliability is in
question
Use the “References” to find the source of the information
and use that for your investigation
What’s OPVL
OPVL is a way to evaluate sources
This is not an application to find if a source is
reliable.
It directs your research/investigation.
As you find sources you use OPVL to see what
“value” it provides your investigation and what
“limitations” it has. The “limitations” illustrate
what other sources you need to improve your
investigation.
Origin
What is the origin of the source?
Author
Date of original publication
Date of any additional additions
Location of publication
How might the time, place, and author of this work
affect the work produced?
For example: George Washington writing about Valley
Forge will have a different interpretation than General
Cornwallis.
Citation
Purpose
POV of the author/creator
Why did the author create the document?
Why did the author write/draw/compose this work?
Consider the audience
Does this author have something to hide?
Is he/she trying to convince anyone of something?
For example: Is this a textbook that is written to inform
a high school student or a press conference given to
reassure the American public?
Value
POV of historian
What value does this source bring to your investigation?
What is the author’s purpose and how can that perception
aid your investigation?
Has this work been particularly well researched?
Is this a secondary source? If so, does that allow the author
distance to create a subjective argument?
Is this a primary source? If so, does that allow the author
to provide a viewpoint that no one else can (since they
experienced it for themselves?)
Limitations
Where does this source cease to be valuable?
This does not invalidate the source, it simple directs
your investigation to its next source
Ex. – WWI soldier account of trenches may be too
narrow (great POV, but missing perspective &
hindsight). Require opposing perspective or broader view
of event/time period Does this author only present part
of the story?
Is this a secondary source? If so, does the author
deliver only part of the story?
Is this a primary source? If so, what viewpoint
does the author present? What is missing from
his/her side of the story?
OPVL Artifact
Exit Slip
What is
OPVL?
Explain each
element.
What is
OPVL used
for?
Issues and Questions
What are you doing?
Defining your goal
Constructing/refining a
research question to
achieve said goal
Researching relevant &
reliable sources toward
your goal
Evaluating sources using
OPVL
Keep your eye on the
objectives and rubric
Criterion A: Investigating
The student is able to:
i. define a clear and highly
challenging goal and context for the
project, based on personal interests
ii. identify prior learning and
subject-specific knowledge that is
consistently highly relevant to the
project
iii. demonstrate excellent research
skills.
Criterion B: Planning
The student is able to:
i. develop rigorous criteria for the
product/outcome
ii. present a detailed and accurate plan
and record of the development process of
the project
iii. demonstrate excellent selfmanagement skills.

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