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Report
New Zealand Refugee Resettlement Strategy and
the English Language measures
Paul Merwood
Migration Research Evaluation and Analysis
Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment
11 July 2014
Success indicators and measures
Self-sufficiency Outcome
All working-age refugees are in paid work or are supported
by a family member in paid work.
Success Indicator
Reduced proportion of working-age refugees receiving unemployment related
benefits after 6 months, 2 years and 5 years in New Zealand.
Success Indicator
Increased proportion of working-age refugees in paid employment after 6
months, 2 years and 5 years.
Success Indicator
Refugees’ access to mental health services
Health and Wellbeing Outcome
Refugees and their families enjoy healthy, safe and
independent lives.
Success Indicator
Children of quota refugees receiving immunisations 6 and 12 months after arrival
Success Indicator
Refugees’ utilization of general practitioner services
Housing Outcome
Refugees live independently of government housing
assistance in homes that are safe, secure, healthy and
affordable.
Education Outcome
Refugees’ English language skills enable them to
participate in education and achieve qualifications, and
support them to participate in daily life.
Success Indicator
A reduction in the amount of housing subsidy spent on quota refugees after two
years and five years in New Zealand
Target
XX% of refugee school leavers achieving NCEA Level 2 after 5 years or more in the
New Zealand education system
Success Indicator
English language achievement of adult refugees (if feasible)
New Zealand Refugee Resettlement Strategy: Success Indicators and Measures
Baseline Outcome Data
Education Outcome
Self-sufficiency Outcome
All working-age refugees are in paid work or are supported by a family member in paid work.
Success Indicator
Increased proportion of working-age refugees in paid employment after 6
months, 2 years and 5 years.
Success Indicator
Reduced proportion of working-age refugees receiving unemployment
related benefits after 6 months, 2 years and 5 years in New Zealand.
Refugees’ English language skills enable them to participate in education and achieve qualifications, and support them to participate in daily
life.
Target
The target of, by 2014, 67% of refugee school leavers achieving National Certificate of Educational
Achievement (NCEA) Level 2 after 5 years or more in the New Zealand education system.
Success Indicator
English language achievement
of adult refugees (if feasible).
The baseline data for this indicator cannot
be calculated because currently refugee
students are not identified in the tertiary
education data.
The Ministry of Education and the Tertiary
Education Commission are reviewing the
tertiary education data collections. This
requirement will be considered as part of
that review.
Source: Ministry of Education
This baseline measure uses the 2006/07 cohort of quota refugees to observe
the change in the proportion earning wage/salaries over a five-year period.
This indicator shows that the proportion or working age refugees earning
wages and salaries increases by each of the three time points (6th, 24th or 60th
month) after residence approval. At 24 months, one in 4 working-age
refugees (25%) was earning wages /salaries and the trend is tracking over
30% towards the five years mark.
Source: Integrated Data Infrastructure, Statistics New Zealand. Earnings data
(from the Inland Revenue Department) is available to December 2011. The 6th
month estimate is suppressed for confidentiality reasons.
This baseline measure uses the 2006/07 cohort of quota refugees to
observe the change in the proportion receiving an unemployment benefit
over a five-year period. This indicator shows that the proportion or working
age refugees receiving an unemployment-related benefit at the end of the
6th, 24th, or 60th month after residence approval decreases over time (from
74% at the 6th month, 46% at the 24th month, and 14% at the 60th month).
Research shows many refugees receive other forms of income support such
as Sickness Benefit, Domestic Purposes Benefit, or Invalid’s Benefit. Welfare
reforms will impact on the measurement of this indicator for future cohorts
of refugees.
Source: Integrated Data Infrastructure, Statistics New Zealand.
The baseline data includes all school leavers between 2009 and 2012. Refugees are identified through the Ministry of Education’s English for Speakers of Other
Languages (ESOL) database. At least five years in the New Zealand education system is calculated from first year enrolled in ESOL to their last year at school. The
data does not distinguish between quota and convention refugees. The data also does not include those who are New Zealand born from a refugee background.
The proportion of refugee school leavers gaining NCEA Level 2 or an equivalent qualification after five years or more in the New Zealand education system
increased from 68.3% in 2009 to 78.5% in 2012. The government’s Better Public Service target for achievement of 18-year-olds is that 85% of all students achieve
NCEA Level 2 or an equivalent qualification by age 18. The Ministry of Education is considering aligning the new target with the Better Public Service target of 85%
because the current target is now out of date having been surpassed already. Options for a revised target are under consideration.
Source: Ministry of Education
Note: The 2006/07 cohort of quota refugees was chosen because it best illustrates the measures over the 6-month, 2-year, and 5-year period. Future analysis
will monitor progress against will monitor progress against the indicators for more recent cohorts.
Housing Outcome
Refugees live independently of government housing assistance in homes that are safe, secure, healthy and
affordable.
Health and Wellbeing Outcome
Refugees and their families enjoy healthy, safe and independent lives.
Success Indicator
Refugees’ utilization of
general practitioner
services
This baseline measure uses
the 2012/13 cohort of quota
refugees to calculate the
number of refugees who
visited general practitioners.
567 out of 848 refugees (67%)
utilized general practitioner
services in the 2012/13 year.
The earliest doctor-visit date
identified was on 14 August
2012 and the latest doctorvisit date identified was on 24
May 2013.
Success Indicator
Children of quota refugees receiving immunisations 6 and 12 months after
arrival
This baseline measure uses the 2012/13 cohort of quota refugees to calculate the
number of refugee children who completed age appropriate immunisations at 6
and 12 months of arrival.
•
•
18 out of 71 refugee children (25%) who have been in New Zealand 6 months
are fully immunised.
17 out of 26 refugee children (65%) who have been in New Zealand 12
months are fully immunised.
Source: Ministry of Health
The Refugee Health Clinic at the Mangere Refugee Resettlement Centre supplied
a list of all National Health Identity for refugees who arrived during the period 1
July 2012 and 30 June 2013. This list was matched to the corresponding
vaccination events recorded on the National Immunisation Register (NIR).
Immunisation coverage includes children born on or after 1 January 2006 when
the NIR became operational.
Source: Ministry of Health.
The Refugee Health Clinic at
the Mangere Refugee
Resettlement Centre supplied
a list of all National Health
Identity for refugees who
arrived during the period 1
July 2012 and 30 June 2013.
Notes:
 Fully immunised status has been achieved when the child has received the
number of antigens recorded in the National Immunisation Schedule or the
Immunisation Catch-Up schedule table.
 There are known messaging issues between the practice management
system and the national immunisation register resulting in under reporting.
 Coverage figures relate to small numbers of eligible children completing
scheduled vaccinations by 6 and 12 months. Because the numbers are small
large variations may result in coverage.
Success Indicator
Refugees’ access to mental health services
Success Indicator
A reduction in the amount of housing subsidy spent on quota refugees after two years and five years in New
Zealand.
This baseline measure uses the first refugee arrival
intake for 2012/13. This intake includes 122 refugees
(out of the total 2012/13 cohort). The measure
counts refugees who received a face-to-face activity
in PRIMHD* since the date of arrival of 29 June
2012.
This baseline measure uses the 2006/07 cohort of quota
refugees to observe the change in the amount of
housing subsidy spent on quota refugees after two years
and five years in New Zealand.
Of the 122 refugees, nearly half (60 people) had
received face-to-face activity with a mental health
service. The earliest first face-to-face contact
identified was within six weeks of the arrival of
intake and was on 3 July 2012 and the latest first
face-to-face contact identified was on 7 August
2012.
180 families were tenants in Housing New Zealand
Corporation (HNZC) houses in 2006/07. Two years later
(2008/09), 167 families were HNZC tenants and $1.501m
Income-Related Rent (IRR) subsidy was paid to those
families representing an increase in IRR subsidy of
$0.019m from 2007/08. At five years (2011/12), 144
refugee families remained in HNZC housing. The IRR
subsidy at the 5-year mark was $1.458m representing a
saving of $0.025m from 2007/08.
Source: Ministry of Health
The Refugee Health Clinic at the Mangere Refugee
Resettlement Centre supplied a list of all National
Health Identity for refugees who arrived during the
period 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2013.
* PRIMHD (pronounced ‘primed’) is a Ministry of
Health single national mental health and addiction
information collection of service activity and
outcomes data for health consumers. The data is
collected from district health boards and nongovernmental organisations.
Over the five year period, 36 refugee families moved out
of HNZC houses.
Source: Housing New Zealand Corporation.
An Income-Related Rent is the rent payable for state
housing based on the incomes of tenants and their
partners.
Note: The 2006/07 cohort of quota refugees was chosen because it best illustrates the measure over the 2-year and 5-year period. Future analysis will monitor progress
against the indicators for more recent cohorts of refugees.
Ongoing monitoring against the success indicators and target: In the future, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment will coordinate annual progress reports to the Strategic Governance Group against the agreed measures, in consultation with the Ministry of Health, the
Ministry of Education, and Housing New Zealand Corporation. It should be noted that there is a lag time in the availability of some data. This means that in any given reporting cycle, data for the most recent intake of refugees will only be available for some measures.
Measuring English Language achievement
• English language assessment
 Literacy and Numeracy for Adults Assessment Tool
(LNAAT)…but not as effective for pre-literate of very
low literacy
• In the interim
 Providers do their own assessment
 Developing a proxy indicator for English Language
achievement
The proportion of refugees achieving a level 2 qualification
(or higher) on the New Zealand Qualifications Framework
 Level 2 or higher qualification in ESOL or other
courses will indicate a level of English to progress
into higher levels of study
Developing the indicator
Refugee entry cohorts
2006/07 – 2011/12
~4,150 people
56% in the age range 18-60
Proportion who have
gained a level 2
qualification (or higher)
26%
Proportion of adult refugees achieving a level 2 qualification (or higher)
Proportion of refugees
40
32.0
30
25.9
20.2
20
10
0
Male
Female
Total
Level 2 qualification achievement
over time
40.0
Proportion of refugees
30.0
18% after 2 years
33% after 5 years
20.0
10.0
0.0
1
2
3
4
5
Number of years since arrival in New Zealand
2006/07-2007/08
2008/09-2009/10
2010/11-2011/12
6

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