by Charles Perrault

Report
Unit 4: Traditional Literature/ and Mythology
This unit will focus on two specific types of fiction stories: traditional literature and mythology.
text
author
level
location
Cendrillon
Robert D. San Souci
and Brian Pinkney
O
HM Anthology
Yeh-Shen
retold by Ai-Ling
T
Unit 4 PDF set and library
Cinderella
Charles Perrault
O
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type
0510a.html#perrault
Cinderella
The Brothers Grimm
Cindy Ellen: A Wild
Western Cinderella
Susan Lowell
L
The Korean Cinderella
Shirley Climo
O
The Rough Faced Girl
Rafe Martin
S
Adelita
Tomie dePaola
O
Unit 4 PDF set
Book Room
Interactive Cinderella
Story
http://www.learner.org/interacti
ves/story/cinderella.html
Other Digital Versions
http://www.usm.edu/media/english
/fairytales/cinderella/inventory.html
and
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type051
0a.html
Odysseus and the Bag of
Winds
The Golden Touch
Pandora’s Box
Lost in His Own Reflection
The Labors of Hercules
The Never-ending Punishment
Greek Mini-books set
Various Titles
T (reading AZ level y)
Reading A-Z (use as a
projectable book)
Reading A-Z close
reading pack (Mythology
Grade 4)
varied
http://www.readingaz.com/commoncore/closereading/pack/?id=641&grade=
grade4
various
various
Shared Folder
various
http://www.readingaz.com/commoncore/closereading/pack/?id=639&grade=
grade2
Reading A-Z close
reading pack (CulturesGrade 2)
Cinderella Stories Available in the Library
text
author
level
call #
Cendrillon
Robert D. San
Souci and Brian
Pinkney
O
398.2 S
Cinderella or The
Little Glass Slipper
Charles Perrault
398.2 P
Walt Disney’s
Cinderella
Disney
F DIS
Once Upon a
Princess. Volume 2
SC DIS
Yeh-Shen: A
Cinderella Story
from China
Ai-Ling Louie
398.2 L
Cinderella
Val Gool
F VAN
A Cinderella Story
Robin Wasserman
F WAS
Chickerella
Mary Jane Auch
F AUC
Cinder Edna
Ellen B. Jackson
F JAC
Cinderella
Beni Montresor
F MON
The Egyptian
Cinderella
Shirley Climo
398.2 C
Bigfoot
Cinderrrrrella
Tony Johnston
398.2 J
Ella Enchanted
Gail Carson
Levine
F LEV
Unit 4: Traditional Literature/ and Mythology
Other Resources:
Digital Resource
Location
Digital Text: Yeh-Shen
(Told from the point of view of the fish)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxmjmp
urKJg
Cartoon Video of Yeh-Shen
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ou0Wy
4ucjs&list=PL50B01E86198AF2C9
Digital Photo Story of Cinderella by the Brother’s
Grimm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrREZLY
GsaY
Fractured Fairytale Cinderella
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwbjet0
zkLI
King Midas (Disney Cartoon Version)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=peIkHDxop4
Fractured Fairytale King Midas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I0cDd_
LO4A
Perseus and Medusa Digital Text
http://www.abc.net.au/arts/wingedsandals/
storytime/perseus_medusa.htm
activity
Location
The Herculympics
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/funny_old_game
/games/4384654.stm
The Labors of Hercules
http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/online/heracl
es2.swf
Which mythological figure are you?
http://thewalters.org/exhibitions/heroes/quiz/
Write your own myth
http://teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/mff/myth
machine.htm
Greek Mythology Digital Story
http://youtu.be/OmgG_IJbsfQ
Unit 4
I can
My Goals
 I can do this with help
 I can do this by
myself
 I can do this with a
hard text
I can summarize what the text
says.
 I can do this with help
 I can do this by
myself
 I can do this with a
hard text
I can select key details from a
text to summarize a selection.
 I can do this with help
 I can do this by
myself
 I can do this with a
hard text
I can determine the theme of a
piece of literature.
 I can do this with help
 I can do this by
myself
 I can do this with a
hard text
I can compare and contrast different
stories by thinking about the different
points of view.
 I can do this with help
 I can do this by
myself
 I can do this with a
hard text
I can compare how similar topics and
themes are present in stories and
traditional literature from different cultures.
 I can do this with help
 I can do this by
myself
 I can do this with a
hard text
I can compare and contrast how similar
patterns of events are presented in stories
and traditional literature from different
cultures.
I can summarize what the text says.
I can select key details from a text to
summarize a selection.
I can determine the theme of a piece of
literature.
I can compare and contrast different stories
by thinking about the different points of view.
I can compare how similar topics and themes
are present in stories and traditional literature
from different cultures.
I can compare and contrast how similar
patterns of events are presented in stories
and traditional literature from different
cultures.
Unit 4
Standard
RL 4.2 Determine a theme
of a story, drama, or
poem from details in the
text; summarize the text.
Suggested Mini-Lessons





Identifying themes within and across texts
Supporting themes with text evidence
Revising ideas about themes while reading
Studying the differences between stories that have similar themes
Note-taking in a way that highlights the similarities and differences
between texts with similar themes
 Developing and revising ideas about themes as we read
 Identifying symbols for themes and ideas
 Using a graphic organizer to help summarize a text
 Finding out what details are most important when creating a
summary
RL 4.6 Compare and
contrast the point of view
from which different
stories are narrated,
including the difference
between first- and thirdperson narrations.
 Determining what a 1st vs. 3rd person story looks like
 How does a story change when told in a 3rd person vs. 1st
person?
RL 4.9 Compare and
contrast the treatment of
similar themes and topics
and patterns of events in
stories, myths, and
traditional literature from
different cultures.
 Comparing and contrasting plot, characters, setting across
similar stories.
 Comparing and contrasting patterns of events in traditional
literature
Supporting Standard Mini
Lessons
 Reading with a theory in mind
 Making connections between a text and a visual
representation of the text
 Understanding words and phrases derived from characters in
Greek mythology
 Using details to explain answers explicitly in text
 Describing a character’s motives to help us understand the
plot of the text
 Describing events from a text in detail
 Analyzing the impact of how characters and events in books
impact our own reactions and responses to events in our lives
Theme: Sample Mini-Lesson
Interactive Read Aloud: (must occur prior to the mini-lesson) Read aloud your favorite picture books.
Mini-Lesson(s): (RL.4.2, RL.4.1, 4.10; L.4.6; SL.4.2) This seed is intended to span over multiple mini- lessons. Explain to
students that when we read a story, we want to think about what the theme of a story is. Theme is what we learn from a
story, themes are inferred, and themes are about the “big world. Refer to any anchor charts you may have already started.
Revisit the text from the interactive read aloud. Point out various places in the text that will help students determine the
theme of this story. You will want to gauge student’s level of knowledge when determining theme of a story.
As you read the story, find places in the text that help the reader understand the theme. (Suggested Text: Any Cinderella
story suggested at the beginning of the unit – multiple could be read to practice understanding).
Guided Practice: Ask students to work together to locate other details in the text that will help to determine theme.
Students will need access to the text in order to do this. If this is not possible, you may want to put the text on the
document camera and walk students through the remainder of the book.
Bring students back together and focus your think aloud on how all of these details in the story make you think about the
theme, or the message the author is trying to convey. Explain that you can infer the author is trying to teach the reader
about friendship, but not just friendship. Friendship that is happening in spite of the barriers that exist. You can infer that
the theme could be “friendship transcends barriers.”
Work Time: Students should have the opportunity to read literary text and practice looking for details that help the reader
determine the theme. Students can write the title of their text and the possible theme on a post-it note and place on the
newly created anchor charts. This information can be used during share time.
While students are working, you will want to either circulate the room, listening to their reading, or pull small groups of
students to provide focus group instruction for students who need additional support. This is also the time you would pull a
guided reading group, if needed.
Share: Bring students back together and refer to any of the post-it notes on the anchor chart. Does anyone have a theme
you would like to share from your reading today? How did you determine the theme? Was it stated directly or did you have
to infer from the author’s clues?
Sample Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart:
What does the author want you to “walk away with” after you no longer have this text (poem/book/drama) in front of you?
What is the theme of this story? How do you know?
What other themes might there be? Is it possible for there to be more than one theme in a story?
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
Refer to the post-it notes students may have posted during work time. Are students showing an understanding of
theme? This will give you a big picture glance.
Exit slip: Explain how we determined the theme of Freedom Summer.
Theme: Cinderella
Interactive Read Aloud: (must occur prior to the mini-lesson) Read aloud Yeh-Shen
Mini-Lesson(s): (RL.4.2, RL.4.1, 4.10; L.4.6; SL.4.2) This seed is intended to span over multiple mini- lessons. Explain to
students that when we read a story, we want to think about what the theme of a story is. Theme is what we learn from a
story, themes are inferred, and themes are about the “big world. Refer to any anchor charts you may have already started.
Revisit the text from the interactive read aloud. Point out various places in the text that will help students determine the
theme of this story. You will want to gauge student’s level of knowledge when determining theme of a story.
As you read the story, find places in the text that help the reader understand the theme.
Themes to discuss:
Good overcomes evil
Patience
Kindness
Guided Practice: Give small groups of students a version of Cinderella. Have students read the text together and determine
the theme/themes of the story by using clues from the text as they practiced during the whole group lesson.
Work Time: During their independent work time, have students find examples of theme in the text they are reading.
Share: Bring students back together and refer to any of the post-it notes on the anchor chart. Does anyone have a theme
you would like to share from your reading today? How did you determine the theme? Was it stated directly or did you have
to infer from the author’s clues?
Sample Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart:
What does the author want you to “walk away with” after you no longer have this text (poem/book/drama) in front of you?
What is the theme of this story? How do you know?
What other themes might there be? Is it possible for there to be more than one theme in a story?
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
Refer to the post-it notes students may have posted during work time. Are students showing an understanding of
theme? This will give you a big picture glance.
THIS LESSON CAN BE REPEATED WITH OTHER TEXTS, INCUDING MYTHS FROM THIS UNIT
Themes in Yeh-Shen
Good Overcomes Evil
Patience
Kindness
Clues from the Text
At the end of the story, Yeh-Shen
gets to live a happy life, while her
stepmother and sister are crushed
by rocks.
Yeh-Shen never complains about
the life she has.
Yeh-Shen is always nice to her
stepmother and sister even though
they treat her horribly.
Summary Review Mini-Lesson
Learning Target:
I can complete an organizer to organize details in a literary text. (RL.4.2)
Note: RL.4.2 asks students to not only determine the theme of a literary text but also to summarize the text. This lesson
seed focuses on the summarization of a literary text. Any text can be used for this. It would be easy to choose a Cinderella
story already read with students.
This lesson seed focuses on how to help students organize the information for a summary. The next lesson seed will show
students how to take the information from the organizer and create a written summary.
Interactive Read Aloud: (must occur prior to the mini-lesson) Read aloud the literary text you plan on using for the minilesson. I
Mini-Lesson(s): (RL.4.2; RL.4.1, 4.10; W.4.8, 4.10; L.4.6; SL.4.2, 4.4, 4.6) This seed is intended to span more than one minilesson. Explain to students that when we write a summary of a literary text we want to include certain details from the
story. A summary should include character’s names, what the problem is and what the solution was. Some stories contain
more than one problem so we want to include that into a summary.
Using a Cinderella story (or any literary text), model how to work on the “Somebody Wanted But So Then” chart. Think
aloud why you are including certain information on the chart. Students should be able to see the text as you work. You may
choose to give students their personal copy of a chart to work on as you model your thinking.
Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson) Split students back into their group you used for discovering
the theme of a Cinderella story. They should fill in the Somebody .. chart for their Cinderella book. Students may work
together or independently to do this work. When finished, ask students to share their charts in order to complete the big
chart for the rest of the text.
Work Time: This is a process students can follow with any literary text. Not all texts have more than one problem. When
that happens, students would only fill out the first row of the organizer.
While students are working, you will want to either circulate the room, listening to their reading or pull small groups of
students to provide focus group instruction for students who need additional support. This is also the time you would pull a
guided reading group.
Share Time: Bring students back together and provide the opportunity for them to share what they did during work time in
regards to “Somebody Wanted But So Then.” If students worked together, they can share to the rest of the group.
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
• Performance Task: Given a short literary text, students will complete a “Somebody Wanted But So Then” organizer for
that text. This text will be used for another task so they need to be kept.
Summary Review Mini-Lesson Continued
Learning Target
I can use my organizer to help me write a summary of a literary text. (RL.4.2)
Note: This lesson seed should occur after the previous seed. In seed #3 students learned how to organize details from a
literary text. This lesson seed will teach students how to take the information from the organizer and create a written
summary.
Mini-Lesson(s): (RL.4.2; RL.4.1, 4.10; L.4.6; SL.4.1b, 4.2, 4.4; W.4.8, 4.10) This seed is intended to span more than one
mini-lesson. Explain to students that they have learned how to take important details from a literary text and organize
them using the “Somebody Wanted But So Then” organizer. The next step is to take the thinking from the organizer and
create a summary. (Use your class summary of the Cinderella story you chose as your model)
You will want to be sure students can see your writing. Chart paper would work well. Another option would be the
projector but you want to make sure it is big enough for students to see.
After reviewing the completed organizer, model how to take the details and create a summary. You will want to orally
rehearse the summary first before putting it into writing.
After orally rehearsing, begin writing the summary. You only want to model a small part before having students practice.
Guided Practice: (this may occur during the next mini-lesson) Have students work in pairs. Direct them to first take turns
orally rehearsing the summary. After both partners have rehearsed the summary, direct them to complete the written
summary.
Bring students back together to share their summaries. Be sure to complete the written summary on the chart paper.
Work Time: Students can practice using their completed organizers from previous work time to create summaries. Students
could get with a partner to practice rehearsing the summary before creating a written summary.
While students are working, you will want to either circulate the room, listening to their reading or pull small groups of
students to provide focus group instruction for students who need additional support. This is also the time you would pull a
guided reading group.
Share: Allow time for students to come together and share any summaries they attempted to write during work time. This
allows you the opportunity to jot notes as students share to assist in the formation of focus groups.
Sample Thinking Stems/Anchor Chart:
• Completed “Somebody Wanted But So Then” organizer from previous lesson seed
Formative Assessment:
• Performance Task: Given the same short literary task from a previous task, students will use their completed organizer in
order to write a summary of the text.
Comparing Themes and Topics
Learning Target:
I can compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics in stories. (RL.4.9)
Note: In order to meet the full intent of RL.4.9, students must be exposed to many different texts that have similar topics
and themes. This lesson seed focuses on two texts that share a similar theme and topic.
The unit earlier in this lesson seed was about determining the theme of a story. Included was a list of possible themes in
children’s literature. This will help in the selection of books used to support this standard.
(Text Options Cinderella stories- i.e. Cendrillon and a traditional Cinderella story – Students can compare Cendrillon wit the
Cinderella story they read in their small group)
Interactive Read Aloud: (must occur prior to the mini-lesson) If you have not yet read your second choice of text for this
lesson seed, now would be the time to read the text with your students. If you are using two familiar texts, then continue
reading aloud the chosen chapter book for this six weeks. The purpose of the interactive read aloud time is to facilitate
conversation amongst the students. We want them talking about the text. Suggestions: Cendrillon and Yeh-Shen or a
traditional Cinderella story.
Mini-Lesson(s): (RL.4.9; RL.4.1, 4.2, 4.10; L.4.6; SL.4.2, 4.4, 4.6; W.4.8, 4.9a) This seed is intended to span more than one
mini-lesson. The two texts should be read prior to this mini-lesson, as well as determining what the theme is of each.
Part 1: Choose one of the texts. Revisit the text by walking through it with students. Introduce the learning target and
explain that in order to compare and contrast themes of stories, readers first must look closely at the text. Show them the
organizer you will be using to help with the process of analyzing text (see sample organizer below). Students will need to
have a personal copy of the organizer for this work.
Model how to begin completing the organizer. Since students don’t have access to the entire text, you may want to model
the two sections on what the characters say. You may also choose to model the section on the symbolism as well
Part 2: Repeat the above process with the second text.
Part 3: Now that both texts have been closely analyzed, focus solely on the characters. Compare how the authors
developed the theme of “kindness” and “good overcomes evil” .
Part 4: Focus solely on the events. Use the completed organizers to compare how the authors developed the theme of
“good overcomes evil” with the events in the stories. Use these thinking stems to lead discussion:
• Explain how the characters in both books overcome obstacles.
Guided practice: (may occur during the next mini-lesson)
Part 5: Bring it all together. Pose this thinking stem to students: Explain how both authors treat the theme of “good
overcomes evit” in both stories. Using the organizers, think aloud about how you would begin to address this thinking stem.
This would be a good opportunity for interactive writing. Students can be an active part of the writing process, while still
being closely guided by the teacher. Or you may choose to have students work in pairs to respond to this thinking stem.
Students could then read each other’s responses and provide feedback, ask questions, etc.
Work Time: Students can work independently or in pairs to practice this process. You will want to make available different
texts that address similar themes and topics.
While students are working, you will want to either circulate the room, listening to their reading or pull small groups of
students to provide focus group instruction for students who need additional support. This is also the time you would pull a
guided reading group.
Share: Bring students back together and allow the opportunity to share what they have worked on during work time.
Students may share whole group, or you may choose to have them turn to a partner to share.
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
• Performance Task: Given two texts that share a similar theme, students will compare and contrast the treatment of the
similar theme in the two stories, using details from the texts.
Comparing Themes and Topics CONTINUED
Learning Target:
I can compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics in stories.
Text Suggestions: Cinderella Stories or Myths (this lesson is a similar repeat of the lesson before, but give students more
practice, which they need to become proficient at this task)
Activity: (RL.4.9, RL.4.2) This seed is intended to span over more than one mini-lesson.
This seed is using two shorter picture books to introduce the concept of comparing the treatment of similar themes. You
will want to move into longer, more complex texts as students are ready.
The two texts should be read before beginning the seed. Determine the theme of each book before proceeding with the
rest of the seed. RL.4.2 was on the maps for weeks 1-18 so you have likely provided instruction on determining theme
already. Students will need to be comfortable talking about theme before moving on with this seed.
Part 1: Choose one of the texts. Revisit the text by walking through it with students. Introduce the learning target and
explain that in order to compare and contrast themes of stories, readers first must look closely at the text. Show them the
organizer you will be using to help with the process of analyzing text (see sample organizer below). Students will need to
have a personal copy of the organizer for this work.
Model how to begin completing the organizer. Since students don’t have access to the entire text, you may want to model
the two sections on what the characters say. You may also choose to model the section on the symbolism as well. The
symbol in Freedom Summer would be the pool – it is the continuing barrier even after the law is passed. In The Other Side
the symbol is the fence. The fence is a symbol of segregation. Students should be able to go back and remember the 4 main
events and work on this in groups.
Part 2: Repeat the above process with the second text.
Part 3: Now that both texts have been closely analyzed, focus solely on the characters. Compare how the authors
developed the characters through their words.
Part 4: Focus solely on the events. Use the completed organizers to compare how the authors developed the theme. Use
these thinking stems to lead discussion:
Part 5: Bring it all together. Using the organizers, think aloud about how you would begin to address this thinking stem. This
would be a good opportunity for interactive writing. Students can be an active part of the writing process, while still being
closely guided by the teacher. Or you may choose to have students work in pairs to respond to this thinking stem. Students
could then read each other’s responses and provide feedback, ask questions, etc.
During work time students can work independently or in pairs to practice this process. You will want to make available
different texts that address similar themes and topics. For example, Our Gracie Aunt by Jacqueline Woodson (K-1 exemplar)
can be used with The Other Side to make comparisons between the themes of resilience.
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
• As students begin to work independently with this, notice who may be having difficulty. Are they able to determine
theme? If not, then those students will need additional support in small groups practicing how theme is determined. If
students have established how to determine theme, then they need additional support in analyzing the text to see how the
author establishes the theme.
Comparing Themes and Topics CONTINUED
Other Lesson Options:
1. Have students compare and contrast two different versions of Cinderella. Compare and contrast
how the setting/culture affected the story. What was different than a traditional Cinderella? Why?
1. Use story maps as resources to help students track information for this purpose. Have them
use a graphic organizer to set up and prepare their thoughts to write a compare/contrast
open-ended response.
2. Compare Cinderella to the Fractured Fairy Tale version:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwbjet0zkLI How is this version different than the traditional?
Why? Why did the creator choose to change parts of the story? How does it affect the message or
theme?
3. Think about the images an illustrator uses to convey meaning in a literary text. Look at pictures in
the different Cinderella stories. How do they help you better understand the text? Can they help
convey emotions? View this video of the classic version of Cinderella from the Brothers Grimm:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrREZLYGsaY (You may want to choose just a part of this to
show as pieces of this story are gruesome). Why did the creators of this video clip choose the
images they did? How did they help convey the meaning and emotions of the story?
4. Digital Version of Yeh-Shen:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ou0Wy4ucjs&list=PL50B01E86198AF2C9 How is this digital
version similar and different than the text? If anything was changed, why do you think it was? Was
there anything in the digital version that was not in the text version? What did the creator of the
cartoon have to do in order to create the cartoon (i.e. inferring character appearance, adding in
settings, etc.)
5. Greek Mythology Lesson: http://www.tncurriculumcenter.org/resource/4866/go
Assessment Options:
After modeling how to compare and contrast (with writing an actual compare/contrast piece) have
students do the same with another text. Can they transfer the same strategies taught during the minilessons?
GLOG: http://1kyteacher.edu.glogster.com/glog-4420-4749/
Above is the link to one teacher’s GLOG assignment on comparing themes in stories. TO do this activity
with students they would each need a computer. The would choose two of the three stories to
read/listen to, then complete the assignment.
Point of View – Compare and Contrast
Learning Target:
I can compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated.
Activity: (RL.4.6, RL.4.1) You will be using an original version of The Three Little Pigs and The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs!
(1st grade classroom library). Feel free to use two other texts that satisfy the intent of this seed. It is strongly suggested that
students have access to the text being used in this seed. During a separate read aloud, you will want to read both versions
to your students. You will want to introduce point of view to your students if this is their first exposure to it.
You will want to focus your think aloud on the pigs’ point of view in The Three Little Pigs. Talk through one or two examples
of the pigs’ point of view, recording your thoughts on the anchor chart as you think out loud. Then use The True Story of the
3 Little Pigs! and think aloud about one or two examples of the wolf’s point of view. Make sure to use the language “point
of view” as you think aloud.
Give students an opportunity to work together and/or independently to continue comparing and contrasting the two
different points of views. You can either have them work in their reader’s notebooks, or you can have them work on post-it
notes and bring the notes up to the anchor chart. If you choose to use the post-it notes, you have the opportunity to
address misconceptions as a whole group.
You will want to allow time at the end to bring the class back together in order to address the work students did during
independent work time.
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
• Were students able to make appropriate responses about the two different points of view?
Other Text Options:
Seriously, Cinderella is so Annoying by Trisha Speed Shaskan (told by the stepmother)
Honestly, Red Riding Hood Was Rotten by Trisha Speed Shaskan (told by the Wolf)
These texts could also be used as group work, having students meet in small groups to read a traditional version of the text
as well as another version to practice comparing and contrasting point of view.
Point of View – Compare and Contrast EXTENSION
Lesson Extension Options: Are you reading a book to your class? Can you compare and contrast the
point of view of two different characters from the same book? See example lesson on next page.
Yeh-Shen Extension: Yeh-Shen is told by a narrator (3rd person). Have students view this clip from
youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxmjmpurKJg This short video is told from the viewpoint
of the fish. How would the whole story have been different if told from that viewpoint? Why is the
viewpoint of the fish different from that of a narrator? How would the story be different if told by the
stepmother? Or perhaps the king?
Point of View – Compare and Contrast (Sample Lesson for comparing point of view of two different characters)
Learning Target:
I can compare and contrast the point of view of two different characters in the same book.
Activity: (RL.4.6, RL.4.1) You will be using The Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare. This was a recommended read
aloud in the unit for weeks 13-18. It is strongly suggested that students have access to the text being used in this seed.
Re-read pages 42-44. Focus your think aloud on how Matt viewed this situation and how Attean viewed this situation. When
Matt chose this section to read to Attean, he said that he just chose his favorite parts to read. So when Attean got angry,
Matt didn’t understand why. Attean said “Him never do that!” and “Never kneel down to a white man!” Matt thought that it
was appropriate because Crusoe had saved the captive’s life. It seems that Matt and Attean don’t see eye to eye about this.
Attean can probably relate to the captive and doesn’t like that the captive had to kneel down. He wouldn’t want to kneel
down to a white man. Matt, on the other hand, doesn’t understand. He just sees that the white man saved the captive’s life.
Record your thinking on the anchor chart.
Reread pages 63 to the middle of page 65. Students can work together to chart Matt’s point of view here and Attean’s point
of view here. How are their two points of views different here? When they come across the fox in the trap, how does each
of them react? Matt is concerned about the fox and wants to help him, but Attean says that they cannot touch the fox
because they didn’t set the trap. Support them to also find a comparison in their points of view. On page 65 they both agree
that the iron trap is a cruel way to trap an animal.
How might our understanding of this text be different if it were written more from Attean’s point of view?
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
• Student responses from anchor chart. Are students able to successfully work together as they determine both characters’
points of view? If not, was it because they had trouble working together? Or was it that they had difficulty determining the
point of view? Depending on the struggle, you will want to form small groups or reteach to the whole class.
Determining Meaning of Mythological Words
Learning Target:
I can determine the meaning of mythological words and phrases.
Activity: (RL.4.4, RL.4.1) The purpose of this seed is to begin an anchor chart with your students.
Explain that you are going to post an anchor chart in the room titled “It’s All Greek to Me!” and it will
stay up for the rest of the school year. This chart will be added to as you read myths. Below you will find
a sample anchor chart. You may find the text exemplars helpful as you continue through this year.
The goal is not just to read and understand myths. The goal of this standard is to teach students the
mythological phrases that are found in literature so that they can better understand what they are
reading. Students need to know what it means when a text says that a character had to use a
“Herculean effort” in order to complete a task.
Through read-alouds, independent readings, and small groups, expose your students to different myths
and text about mythological people. The sample anchor chart below is what your chart might look like
after a few exposures to reading myths and texts about mythological people.
What does it mean to have the Midas touch?
How does this reference help the reader understand the character in the story?
What is meant by a Herculean task?
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
As students read literary texts, notice if they are able to determine what certain mythological phrases
mean. Are they able to explain how knowing what that phrase means helps them better understand
what a character is doing?
Are students able, when asked, to locate certain mythological phrases while reading?
Notice if students begin to recognize allusion to mythical characters in text during
independent reading.
Introduction to RL 4.7 – Connecting Text to a Video Clip
Learning Target:
I can make connections between the text in a story and a video clip about the text.
Background Information: When looking at this standard, there are a few different directions you can take instruction. This
seed will focus on reading the text and making connections to visual presentation in the form of a video clip.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tme7Wsnvn3I (Text version)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6um6Mr-Ea4EI (Disney video version)
For this lesson, we can focus on the myth, The Midas Touch.
-What can we gather about the mood while reading the text?
-What character actions are described in the text?
After revisiting the text, watch the short video clip. Instruct students to look at the details of the clip. The following
questions may help focus their thinking:
-What can we gather about the mood while watching the video clip?
-What character actions do we see while watching the video clip?
You will want to use an anchor chart to organize the information gained from both versions. There is an example below of
how you may choose to organize it.
After the anchor chart has been completed, divide the class into four different groups. Hang four posters around the room,
each containing one of the thinking stems below. Students will work with each other to craft an answer to their question.
Each group will share with the rest of the class.
What information can you find in the text that helps you understand this event better?
What did you see in the video clip that helps you understand this event better?
Which important details are in the text that aren’t in the video clip?
Which important details are in the video clip that aren’t in the text?
Formative Assessment Opportunities:
As students work together, take note of who may be having difficulty being an active participant. These students may need
additional support with this type of thinking during small group time.
RL 4.2
Common Themes
Found in Literature
Theme found in
________________
_
RL 4.2
How I know
(clues from the text)
My Summary of
RL 4.2
Somebody
Somebody
Wanted
Wanted
But
So
T
H
E
N
But
So
Name:
I’m summarizing a story
 read to me
 I read to myself
RL 4.2
My Summary of: __________________________________________
Somebody
Wanted
But
So
Name:
I’m summarizing a story
 read to me
 I read to myself
RL 4.2
My Summary of: _________________________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
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RL 4.8
Compare Themes
Story:
Story:
How are they alike?
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
How are they different?
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RL 4.6
Compare Point of View
Story:
Story:
Point of View:
Point of View:
How does the point of view change the story?
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How is the story the same despite the point of view?
________________________________
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________________________________
Compare and Contrast
_____________
RL 4.8 or RL 4.9
_______________
How are they alike?
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
How are they different?
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Name:
Compare and Contrast
I’m comparing/contrasting:
 the theme
 the characters
 the plot
 the setting
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RL 4.4
It’s All Greek to Me
Word/Phrase
Herculean Effort
The Midas Touch
Pandora’s Box
An Odyssey
What it means:
Why it means
this:
It’s All Greek to Me
Word/Phrase
What it means:
Why it means
this:
Digital Text Connections
Title:
Text
Mood
Characters’
Actions
What elements
help you better
understand the
text?
Other
RL 4.7
Video Clip/Digital
Text
Cinderella
The Little Glass Slipper
by Charles Perrault
Once there was a gentleman who married, for his second wife, the proudest and
most haughty woman that was ever seen. She had, by a former husband, two
daughters of her own, who were, indeed, exactly like her in all things. He had likewise,
by another wife, a young daughter, but of unparalleled goodness and sweetness of
temper, which she took from her mother, who was the best creature in the world.
No sooner were the ceremonies of the wedding over but the stepmother began
to show herself in her true colors. She could not bear the good qualities of this pretty
girl, and the less because they made her own daughters appear the more odious. She
employed her in the meanest work of the house. She scoured the dishes, tables, etc.,
and cleaned madam's chamber, and those of misses, her daughters. She slept in a sorry
garret, on a wretched straw bed, while her sisters slept in fine rooms, with floors all
inlaid, on beds of the very newest fashion, and where they had looking glasses so large
that they could see themselves at their full length from head to foot.
The poor girl bore it all patiently, and dared not tell her father, who would have
scolded her; for his wife governed him entirely. When she had done her work, she used
to go to the chimney corner, and sit down there in the cinders and ashes, which caused
her to be called Cinderwench. Only the younger sister, who was not so rude and uncivil
as the older one, called her Cinderella. However, Cinderella, notwithstanding her
coarse apparel, was a hundred times more beautiful than her sisters, although they
were always dressed very richly.
It happened that the king's son gave a ball, and invited all persons of fashion to
it. Our young misses were also invited, for they cut a very grand figure among those of
quality. They were mightily delighted at this invitation, and wonderfully busy in
selecting the gowns, petticoats, and hair dressing that would best become them. This
was a new difficulty for Cinderella; for it was she who ironed her sister's linen and
pleated their ruffles. They talked all day long of nothing but how they should be
dressed.
"For my part," said the eldest, "I will wear my red velvet suit with French
trimming."
"And I," said the youngest, "shall have my usual petticoat; but then, to make
amends for that, I will put on my gold-flowered cloak, and my diamond stomacher,
which is far from being the most ordinary one in the world."
They sent for the best hairdresser they could get to make up their headpieces
and adjust their hairdos, and they had their red brushes and patches from
Mademoiselle de la Poche.
Sample Open-Ended Item
The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf
Smarter Balanced Assessments
The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf
Read the story about a boy who takes care of sheep and then
answer the question that follows.
A Shepherd's Boy was tending his flock near a village, and
thought it would be great fun to trick the villagers by pretending
that a Wolf was attacking the sheep: so he shouted out, "Wolf!
Wolf!" and when the people came running up he laughed at them
because they believed him. He did this more than once, and every
time the villagers found they had been tricked, for there was no
Wolf at all. At last a Wolf really did come, and the Boy cried, "Wolf!
Wolf!" as loud as he could: but the people were so used to hearing
him call that they took no notice of his cries for help. And so no
one came to help the boy, and the Wolf attacked the sheep.
In a few sentences, explain what lesson the reader can learn from
the shepherd’s boy. Use details from the story to support your
response.
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The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf
Grading Descriptors
Sample Open-Ended Item
How the Leaves Came Down
Smarter Balanced Assessments
Below is part of a poem about leaves and a story about a
robin. Read the two texts and think about how they are similar
and then answer the question that follows.
How the Leaves Came Down
'll tell you how the leaves came down.
The great Tree to his children said,
"You're getting sleepy, Yellow and Brown,
Yes, very sleepy, little Red;
It is quite time you went to bed."
"Ah!" begged each silly, pouting leaf,
"Let us a little longer stay;
Dear Father Tree, behold our grief,
'Tis such a very pleasant day
We do not want to go away."
So, just for one more merry day
To the great Tree the leaflets clung,
Frolicked and danced and had their way,
Upon the autumn breezes swung,
Whispering all their sports among,
"Perhaps the great Tree will forget
And let us stay until the spring
If we all beg and coax and fret."
But the great Tree did no such thing;
He smiled to hear their whispering.
The Little Captive
One day Bessie’s mother said to her that she must open
the cage, and let the bird fly away. “No, no mother!” said
Bessie, “don’t say so. I take such comfort in him, I can’t let
him go.” But the next moment she remembered how
unhappy it made her to disobey her mother; and, taking
down the cage she opened the door.
To her great surprise, her little captive did not care to
take the freedom offered him. After a while he seemed to
understand that he was expected to come out of the cage;
and what do you think was the first thing that the little bird
did? Why, he lighted right on Bessie’s shoulder, as if he hated
to leave her.
Bessie was pleased enough to see him so tame. She
took him in her hand, and, carrying him to the window, held
him out until he soared away into the air. But he did not
forget his adopted home; for the next day, while Bessie was
at dinner, she heard a flutter of wings, and again the bird
perched upon her shoulder. After pecking some crumbs from
the table-cloth, away he flew again out of the window.
But, my dear little friends, you will be surprised when I
tell you that day after day, for two or three weeks, that little
robin made a visit to Bessie’s house.
How the Leaves Came Down
The Little Captive
Compare how the actions of the leaves are similar to the actions of
the little robin. Use details from both texts to explain similarities.
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How the Leaves Came Down & The Little Captive
Rightly Unfair
Rightly Unfair
Janie frowned as Chandra left the room.
“What’s wrong, Janie?” Ms. Simpson asked.
“Every day at 3:00 Chandra’s mother picks her up from school,” Janie explained. “Even though
she gets to go home when class is over, I have to wait until 3:20 just like everyone else before I’m
allowed to leave.”
Ms. Simpson smiled at Janie. “Have you talked with Chandra about it?”
“No,” Janie admitted. “But she should have to wait like everyone else, no matter what.”
“I think it would be best if you told her how you feel,” Ms. Simpson said. “Then maybe you’d
think differently about the situation.”
Janie kept frowning and sat in her seat until the bell rang at 3:20 and she left the room. The next
day, she sat next the Chandra at lunch.
“So why do you get to leave early every day while the rest of us have to wait?” Janie asked
immediately.
“What?” Chandra asked.
“At 3:00” Janie explained. “Your mom picks you up every day.”
“Oh!” Chandra exclaimed. “My mom gets me early so I can go with her to read to the kids at the
library. Every day from 3:15-5:!5, kids visit the library for story time. We read for a half hour to
each age group, three-year-olds, four-year-olds, five-year-olds, and six-year-olds. The kids love it.
I love it, too.
“Oh, I didn’t know that,” Janie said.
“It’s great to be able to read to younger kids,” Chandra continued. “It makes me feel so good to
do that for them. I’ll admit, though, it’s not easy finding interested stories for them every day.
The three-year-olds get bored very easily.”
“Well, I have a few great stories at home that I read when I was that age,” Janie said. “Do you
want me to give them to you to read to the kids? I’m sure they would find them interesting. I
could bring them to you tomorrow during lunch.”
“That would be great!” Chandra replied.
“I guess it is fair that you get to leave early,” Janie said. “I never realized that you had such a
good reason.”
Rightly Unfair
Read the instructions below. Select a sentence from the passage that best
supports each inference.
How Janie Changes in the Story
Janie is jealous in the beginning of the story.
Janie is helpful by the end of the story.
Who is Ms. Simpson?
A. Janie’s mother
B. Janie’s teacher
C. Chandra’s mother
D. the librarian
Explain why you chose your answer. Use details from the story to
support your reasoning.
Rightly Unfair Key
Who is Ms. Simpson?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Janie’s mother
Janie’s teacher
Chandra’s mother
the librarian

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