Presentation 1: BC Skills for Jobs Blueprint

Report
Developing a New Generation
of Skilled Workers
Summer Labour Market Conference
Vancouver, BC
July 31, 2014
Scott MacDonald
Assistant Deputy Minister
Labour Market & Immigration Division
Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training
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800,000
BC’s population:
AGE
600,000
400,000
Slow growth of new
labour force entrants
expected
200,000
0
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035
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800,000
BC’s population:
AGE
600,000
400,000
Retirement-aged
population to experience
significant growth
200,000
Expected to peak in 2021
0
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035
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BC’s aging population
800,000
Population aged 20-29
Population aged 55-64
600,000
In 2016, number of
retirement-aged British
Columbians (55-64 years)
will surpass those aged
20-29 (potential new
labour force entrants)
400,000
200,000
0
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035
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
2/3 from demographic changes

1/3 economic development

530,000 young people to enter job market

More than 78% will require some post-secondary

43% will be in trades & technical occupations
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WORKFORCE NEEDS FOR MAJOR PROJECTS
CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATIONS JOBS
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WORKFORCE NEEDS FOR MAJOR NORTHERN BC PROJECTS
CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATIONS JOBS:
38,500 TOTAL JOB OPENINGS:
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WORKFORCE NEEDS FOR LNG PROJECTS
Up to 100,000 jobs, including:
58,700 direct & indirect construction jobs in 2018
23,800 permanent direct & indirect operations jobs in 2023
13,000 induced jobs
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1 Data-Driven
Aligning training dollars and programs with jobs-in-demand
2 Cross-Government
Implementing action plan with unprecedented level of integration
3 Innovative
Innovating education and training programs to meet BC’s needs
4 Role for Industry
Creating stronger role for employers, labour & industry
5 Culture/Attitudes
Changing culture and attitudes to get more youth involved earlier
6 First Nations
Working closely with Aboriginal communities
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 Doubling the number of ACE-IT spaces to 5,000 over
the next two years.
 Expanding dual credits in our schools to get students
trained more quickly
 Encouraging partnerships
 Expand WorkBC.ca and web-tools to focus on youth
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 Funding for apprenticeship trades ambassadors
 Reform Grade 10-12 graduation requirements to
allow personalized graduation plans
 Applied Skills Curriculum in Grades K-9 should
excite and prepare students
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 More teachers qualified to teach skills foundation
courses in high schools
 Making it faster and easier for qualified trades people to
earn teaching certificates
 More skills training scholarships
 Inform and engage parents, teachers and counselors
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 Target $40 million annually in Student Financial
Assistance grants to labour market priorities
 Align 25% of public institutions’ operating grants to
support in-demand jobs, reaching $270-million per year
 Invest $185-million over three years in infrastructure
and equipment for skills and trades training
 $6.8-million to reduce waitlists in high demand trades
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 System funding is directed to needs and is outcome-based
 British Columbians are first in line with the skills needed for jobs
to help grow B.C.’s economy
 Youth have choices and are encouraged to study in-demand
occupations and go to where the jobs are located
 Industry and labour market needs are met
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Get and use labour market
information to inform decisions
 Regularly refine and update
 Align programs with labour
market demands
 Created Labour Market Priorities
Board
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Refocusing the ITA

Moving toward a demand driven system

Unifying cross government decision-making based on
labour market information and workforce targets

Reconstituted the ITA board of directors

Bringing the Industry Training Organizations inside the
ITA and establishing Sector Advisory Groups
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Connecting youth with the workplace
 Attracting students to trades and technical careers
 Increasing employer sponsors for apprenticeships
 Creating more work-based training
 Preparing and matching British Columbians with jobs
 Hiring more Apprenticeship Advisors
 Making it easier for workers to move between major projects
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In partnership with Government of Canada:
 Memorandum of Understanding on a Strong Resource
Economy
 Increasing the number of apprenticeships in high
demand areas
 Reducing barriers to labour mobility and foreign
credential recognition for workers
 Maximizing employer investment in Canada Job Grant
and Labour Market Development Agreement
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Canada-BC Job Fund - $65M per Year
Canada Job Grant
1.
2.
3.
4.
$10K Grant
(application based)
Employer determines who
gets training and what type
Employer contributes 50%
cost matching (1/3 of total
training costs)
Eligible costs limited to
training only (3rd party
trainer)
Employee has a job at the
end of training
Employer-Sponsored
Training
1. Employer contributes cash
or in‐kind (flexibility)
2. Employer decides who gets
training and what type
3. Job at the end of training
4. Flexibility in program
delivery to meet provincial
LM needs
Employment Services and
Supports
1. Enhance the labour market
participation of workers by
assisting them to prepare
for entry to, or return to,
employment
2. Supports vulnerable
workers
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Develop innovative solutions to make trades training work better
 Modernize delivery systems
o
Mobile training facilities
o
In-camp training
o
Front–end loaded courses
o
Virtual classrooms
 Harmonize apprenticeship training across Canada
 Share equipment and facilities with industry
 Improving apprenticeship completion rates
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www.workbc.ca/skills
Helping British Columbians find
their fit in our growing economy

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