File

Report
Henry Clay's American System
Second National Bank voted by
Congress in 1816.
 Dependence on Europe’s economy and
politics have now decreased
significantly.

Tariff of 1816
Purpose?
 First protective tariff in U.S. History
 Started a protective trend in U.S. trade
 Calhoun vs. Webster vs. Clay

Internal Improvements
Bonus Bill
 Jeffersonians opposed direct federal
support of intrastate internal
improvements; saw it as a states’ rights
issue
 Prior to Civil War, most internal
improvements (except railroads) were
done at the expense of state and local
governments

Era of Good Feelings



James Monroe
elected President
Continued VA
Dynasty
Carried out most of
the ideals Jefferson
established.
(Hamilton’s financial
plan, expansion,
loose construction in
certain cases)
Era of Good Feelings




Emerging sectionalism
(east, west and south)
Tariff issue (east and south
opposed; west in favor)
Internal improvements
(east and south opposed;
west in favor)
Bank of U.S. (BUS) (west
and south opposed;
eastern bankers in favor)




Sale of public lands (east
opposed; west and south
in favor)
Panic of 1819 resulted in
western hostility toward
eastern bankers.
Issue of slavery in Missouri
created increased
sectionalism (north vs.
south)
Republican party enjoying
1-party rule began
developing factions
eventually leading to the
2nd Party System in the
1830s.
Panic of 1819
Economic panic and depression
 Causes
 Results
 Monroe reelected in 1820 with all but
one electoral vote… Only president in
history to be elected after a major panic.

The Growing West
New states' characteristics
 Maintaining a sectional balance in
Congress was a supreme goal.
 Reasons for westward expansion
 Western Population and influence

Missouri Compromise
Missouri asked Congress to enter the
union in 1819
 Tallmadge Amendment- The Senate
refused to pass the amendment and a
crisis hung over the nation.
 Provisions
 Balance of Free and Slave states

Missouri Compromise
John Marshall
His decisions greatly increased power of
the federal government over the states.
 Fletcher v. Peck (1810)
 McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)
 Dartmouth College v. Woodward (1819)
 Gibbons v. Ogden -- 1824

McCulloch v. Maryland
•
•
•
•
1819
Second National Bank of the United
States decision upheld the power of
Congress to charter a bank as a
government agency
Denied the state the power to tax that
agency.
Upheld the power of the federal
government over that of the states as
well
Gibbons vs. Ogden
•
•
•
•
1824
NY tried to grant a monopoly of river
commerce btwn NY/NJ to a private
company.
This case ruled that only the federal
government has authority over interstate
commerce.
No state monopolies!
Foreign Policy after the War of
1812
Rush-Bagot Treaty
 Treaty of 1818
 U.S. gains Spanish Florida-Jackson and
First Seminole war
 Monroe Doctrine

Rush Bagot Treaty
1817
 Madison still in office
 Significantly limited naval armament on
the Great Lakes

Treaty of 1818
Made with Britain
 John Quincy Adams
 Secretary of State
 American Canadian Border, Oregon
Territory

Acquisition of Florida
First Seminole War (1816-1818)
 Andrew Jackson sweeps through Florida
and captures Spanish cities. (Disobeyed
direct orders from Monroe)
 John Q. Adams and Monroe Ultimatum
 Adams-Onis Treaty of 1819

Monroe Doctrine





Written by J.Q.A.
Leave America Alone!
U.S. would regard attempts at European
control in the Americas as a personal threat.
Europe should no longer colonize the
American continents.
U.S. would not interfere in European affairs.
Impacts of the Monroe Doctrine
Immediate impact of Monroe Doctrine
was small
 Long Term Impact: Monroe doctrine
became cornerstone of US foreign
policy during the last half of the 19th
century and throughout the 20th century.
 J.Q.A. becomes the most significant
secretary of state.


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