Classroom Management

Report
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
CREATING A POSITIVE LEARNING CLIMATE
Suzanne Whisler
ESU 4
August 9, 2011
GIVE ONE, GET ONE
Think about an example of good classroom
management that you have observed in the
classroom. Jot it down on a note card.
When the music begins, stand up and find
someone at a different table. Share your tip.
Swap tips with one other partner.
Jot down your partners tips.
OUTCOMES
Classroom Rules
Classroom Procedures
Consequences
Design an overall plan for
discipline
The First Days of School
How to be an Effective Teacher
Harry & Rosemary Wong
Unit C
Classroom
Management
THE ART & SCIENCE OF TEACHING
Chapter 6
What will I do to establish or maintain
classroom rules and procedures?
Chapter 7
What will I do to recognize and acknowledge
adherence and lack of adherence to classroom
rules and procedures?
INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN
QUESTION 6:
WHAT WILL I DO TO ESTABLISH OR
MAINTAIN CLASSROOM RULES AND
PROCEDURES?
THE CHARACTERISTICS OF A WELLMANAGED CLASSROOM
Students are deeply involved with their work,
especially with academic, teacher-led instruction.
Students know what is expected of them and are
generally successful.
There is relatively little wasted time, confusion, or
disruption.
The climate of the classroom is work-oriented but
relaxed and pleasant.
HAVE YOU SEEN ANY OF THESE
BEHAVIORS IN THE CLASSROOM?
Disruptive and/or off-task behavior
Evidence of insubordination
Power struggles
Demonstration of the need for certain students to
take control, draw attention to themselves, and
receive negative psychological “pay-offs”
THE FIRST DAYS ARE CRITICAL
What you do on the first days of school
will determine your success or failure for
the rest of the school year.You will either
win or lose your class on the first days of
school.
 Wong & Wong, 1998
THE EFFECTIVE TEACHER…
Invests time in teaching discipline
and procedures, knowing that this
will be repaid multifold in the
effective use of class time.
Wong & Wong, 1998
CLASSROOM RULES
Decided in advance
3-5
Clearly communicated
Minimal student involvement
If possible, state rules positively
THE FIRST DAYS OF SCHOOL
READ PP. 147-152
Highlight the
important ideas
Round robin sharing,
one idea at a time
PROCESSING TIME
Reflect on the information that has been shared and
what you have read regarding classroom rules.
Develop a draft of your classroom rules.
Develop a plan for sharing the rules with your
students.
You can work alone or with a partner(s)
Art and Science of Teaching pp. 123-129
“THE NUMBER ONE PROBLEM
IN THE CLASSROOM IS NOT
DISCIPLINE; IT IS THE LACK OF
PROCEDURES AND
ROUTINES.”
(WONG & WONG, 1998).
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
DISCIPLINE AND PROCEDURES
Discipline: Has penalties and rewards.
Procedures: Have no penalties or rewards.
Discipline: Concerns how students behave.
Procedures: Concern how things are done.
Wong and Wong, 1998
IDENTIFY BEHAVIORS, PROCEDURES, &
ROUTINES TO TEACH
Entering the room
How to volunteer a response
Asking to leave the room (restroom, etc.)
Transitions
Getting ready to leave & orderly dismissal
Organizing personal workspace
Making sure items get home
Recording assignments in assignment notebook
Others? Involve students in this brainstorming stage!
FRONT LOAD EXPECTED BEHAVIORS
“If you want it, teach it.”
Teach vs. Tell
Proactive vs. reactive approach
Student self-control vs. constant teacher control
Prioritize, teach 2-3 most important per
week until all have been taught
TEACH EXPECTED BEHAVIORS:
FIVE STEPS FOR GETTING KIDS READY
1. Brainstorm the expectations; determine and
teach the content.
2. Model the behavior.
3. Practice the behavior.
4. Reinforce the behavior.
5. Re-teach the behavior.
“If you want it,
teach it.”
JIGSAW READING ACTIVITY
 Number off in your groups 1 through 3
 #1s will read pp. 170-172
 #2s will read pp. 173-174
 #3s will read pp. 175-177
 After you have read your section get into your expert
groups to discuss main points & key learnings.
 The person with the most pockets is the jigsaw leader.
 Get back with your jigsaw group. Each member presents
the main points from their section.
PROCESSING TIME
What procedures will be necessary to teach
in the first few days for the smooth opening
of class?
Make a list of the procedures you want to
teach to your students the first few days of
school.
The Art and Science of Teaching pp. 125-127
No matter what grade level or subject
you teach, ALL procedures must be
rehearsed.
Explain
Rehearse
Reinforce
REMEMBER TO . . .
Periodically review you
rules and procedures
Make changes as
necessary
INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN
QUESTION 7:
WHAT WILL I DO TO RECOGNIZE
AND ACKNOWLEDGE ADHERENCE
AND LACK OF ADHERENCE TO
CLASSROOM RULES AND
PROCEDURES?
7. WHAT WILL I DO TO RECOGNIZE AND ACKNOWLEDGE
ADHERENCE AND LACK OF ADHERENCE TO CLASSROOM
RULES AND PROCEDURES?
 Action Step 1: Use simple verbal and non-verbal acknowledgment.
 Action Step 2: Use tangible recognition when appropriate.
 Action Step 3: Involve the home in recognition of positive student
behavior.
 Action Step 4: Be “with it.”
 Action Step 5: Use direct-cost consequences.
 Action Step 6: Use group contingency.
 Action Step 7: Use home contingency.
 Action Step 8: Have a strategy for high-intensity situations.
 Action Step 9: Design an overall plan for disciplinary problems.
THE TWO KINDS OF CONSEQUENCES
Positive consequences or REWARDS
result when people abide by the rules.
Negative consequences or PENALTIES
results when people break the rules.
SCAN PP. 153 - 160 OF
THE FIRST DAYS OF SCHOOL
In one or two sentences, summarize your plans
for consequences in your classroom
Quick-Write
CRITERIA FOR TEACHING
AND RETEACHING BEHAVIORS
Be consistent
Be dispassionate
Confront the behavior
not the person.
Be professional
approach student privately
never use sarcasm or ridicule
Follow up appropriately
THE IMPORTANCE OF . . . WITHITNESS
“aware of what is happening in all parts of the classroom
at all times by continuously scanning the classroom”
“the disposition of the teacher to quickly and accurately
identify…potential problem behavior and to act on it
immediately”
Focus
Withitness
Number of
Studies /
Subjects
Average
Effect Size
3 / 426
-1.417
Percentile
Decrease in
Disruptions
42
(Kounin, 1983; Brophy, 1996, in Marzano, 2003, p. 67)
IN OTHER WORDS…
Management By Walking Around
(MBWA)
“On your feet, not on your seat.”
Constant monitoring
WHAT DOES WITHITNESS LOOK LIKE?
What recognizable, replicable behaviors
do “with it” teachers exhibit?
Think-Pair-Share
MORE INFORMATION
ON THESE ACTION
STEPS CAN BE
FOUND ON PP. 136148 OF THE ART AND
SCIENCE OF TEACHING
MOST IMPORTANT WORDS
The three most important words to
a painter, pilot, or chef are
Preparation, preparation, preparation
The three most important words to
a teacher are
Preparation, preparation, preparation.
PROCESSING TIME
Begin designing your overall discipline
“All battles are won before they are
fought.”
~Sun Tzu
FOUR-TWO-ONE
Generate four words that capture the most
important aspects of your learning today.
Share your four words with with your table and
compile a list of the words you have in common.
From the list, determine two words that you agree
capture the most important aspects.
Next, determine the one word or “big idea” that
best represents the most important learning of the
experience.
Chart your words and share out.
YOU MAKE A DIFFERENCE

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