welcome and industry overview

Report
CAPITOL HILL BRIEFING
DEC 11, 2013
SUPERCONDUCTING PARTICLE
ACCELERATOR FORUM OF AMERICA
KENNETH O. OLSEN
SPAFOA Mission
“The SPAFOA provides a formal network for
its industry members with common business
interests to interact with government funded
accelerator R&D and siting of large
accelerator projects”
• Tech Transfer: Enhance US industry’s communications with DOE, labs, and
universities to incorporate industry in RD&D as a early partner. Enhance US
industrial capability in accelerator technology)
• Fair Procurement Policies: Promoting Government procurement policies that
level the playing field for US suppliers (US jobs with US dollars)
• Accelerator Stewardship: Assist DOE Office of Science Accelerator Stewardship
Program activities by providing input on R&D needs and applications. Attend
workshops and participate in reports as appropriate.
• Congressional Liaison: Communicate issues that foster the growth of industrial
capability and jobs with the Congress
SPAFOA Evolution
• Chartered in 2005 as a 501 (c) 6 not for profit DC
corporation titled the “Linear Collider Forum of the
Americas” (LCFOA)
• Reorganized in 2008 to the Superconducting Particle
Accelerator Forum of the Americas (SPAFOA)
• Renamed in 2012 to the Superconducting Particle
Accelerator Forum of America to reflect 100% US
industry membership
• Current membership totals 25 ~75% small high tech
businesses in 14 States
• Advocate for the US “Industrialization” in advanced
accelerator programs
Two Facets of the Accelerator Industry
“Low” Energy
(Commercial Customers)
“High” Energy
(Government Customers)
• Evolutionary market
• 10% annual growth
• >10,000 in 1992; >30,000 now
• >6,000 in medical applications
• Multiple suppliers for major
market segments
• Each facility different design
A few
companies
are in both
facets
• Gov’t, university and industry
users
• SC technology showing
dominance
• No near term significant
commercial market
Current Major Accelerator Markets
Application
Category
Global Num
Energy
Medical Treatment
Medicine
11,000
4-250 MeV
Ion Implantation
Industry
10,200
1-4 MeV
Materials Processing
Industry
7000
300 KeV
E Beam Irradiation
Industry
1800
75 KeV-12 MeV
Inspection
Security and
Defense
1500
0.5-9.0 MeV
Neutron Generators
Industry
1500
2-10 MeV
Radioisotope Production
Medicine
1000
7-30 MeV
Ref: R. Hamm “xxx”
Manufacturers literature
IAEA
Future Accelerator Markets
High Energy-SCRF Technology:
• Discovery Science: FRIB, LCLS II, ILC
• Security: Weapon countermeasures
• Environmental: Major waste treatment facilities
Key: Strong competitive US industrial base, level international competitive
playing field, R&D partnerships with national labs and universities
Low Energy- E-Beam Technology:
• Food sterilization
• Air and water pollution treatment
• Industrial processes
Key: Lower accelerator costs and increased reliability. Demos to prove
regulatory compliance; public acceptance of technology
US Industrialization
• SCRF Cavities for SNS and CBEAF were purchased from
•
•
•
•
•
Europe
Since then US industry has produced X prototypes of ILC
cavities
DOE, thru Fermilab, has invested over $50M in SCRF R&D
and procurements with US industry over the past 10 years
US industry now has a least 2 qualified suppliers for all major
SCRF accelerator components
US industry was excluded from the 560 XFEL cavity
procurements , enabling EU industry to invest in significant
tooling for future competitions
Industrialization provides the foundation for our industry to
grow, pay taxes, and train and provide jobs for high tech.
manufacturing workers
US Industrialization
A strong US industrial base for high energy accelerators
provides:
• Continuous support of DOE SC
• Growth into other Government markets (some classified)
• Foundation for US participation in ILC
However the playing field is tilted against us unless:
• DOE limits future accelerator hardware contracts to US
industry with an exemption to FAR 6.3
• US Congress enacts legislation limiting competition to US
companies and/or
• Laboratory procurements require US only competition for
strategic reasons such as National security or maintaining
capability to partner in international programs such as the ILC
Major Stakeholders
DOE SC
Industry
National
Labs
Congress
Other
Agencies
Briefing Objectives
• Update from DOE Office of Science
• Progress on accelerator stewardship
• Congressional perspectives
• Future applications
• Industrialization progress and issues

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